Videos on 'Logic'

logic
Logic, originally meaning "the word" or "what is spoken", but coming to mean "thought" or "reason", is a subject concerned with the most general laws of truth, and is now generally held to consist of the systematic study of the form of valid inference.
There is no universal agreement as to the exact scope and subject matter of logic, but it has traditionally included the classification of arguments, the systematic exposition of the 'logical form' common to all valid arguments, the study of inference, including fallacies, and the study of semantics, including paradoxes.
W Logic
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ADAM
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JESUS
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JESUS
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LOGIC NEWS (4)
DESCENDING DATE ORDER
LOGIC RSS FEED
Links from 44 RSS Newsfeeds: Al-Jazeera, BBC, CNN, Reuters, RT News etc. (where available).

  • Monday 19 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Monday 19 August, 2019
    Mirwais Elmi and his bride survived but many relatives are among the 63 killed in Saturday's attack.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Former Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco, who became the state's first female elected governor only to see her political career derailed by the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, has died. After struggling for years with cancer, Blanco died Sunday in hospice care in Lafayette. Please pray for God's peace to carry us through the coming days and months of sorrow as we mourn her absence from our lives," Blanco's family said in a statement released by Gov. John Bel Edwards' office.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Islamic State militant group claimed responsibility on Sunday for a suicide blast at a wedding reception in Afghanistan that killed 63 people, underlining the dangers the country faces even if the Taliban agrees to a pact with the United States.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Rising food and social care prices and severe delays in medical supplies are just some of the effects of a 'no-deal' Brexit predicted in the leaked documents, according to the Sunday Times.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Peter Navarro and Larry Kudlow dispute market indicatorsTariffs are hurting China not US, trade aide insists Donald Trump and his chief trade advisers insisted on Sunday the US is not facing a recession which markets appear to fear and which prove costly at the polls next year. Related: Less boom, more bust? Economic fears threaten Trump's 2020 message Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Greenland is not for sale and the idea of selling it to the United States is absurd, Denmark's prime minister said on Sunday after an economic adviser to President Donald Trump confirmed the U.S. interest in buying the world's largest island.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Explosives might be used to free two cavers trapped since Saturday in the Tatra mountains.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Explosives might be used to free two cavers trapped since Saturday in the Tatra mountains.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Donald Trump blasted Fox News, questioning what has long been a favored network for the president after a recent poll found his approval rating slipping.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    U.S. President Donald Trump said on Sunday he would keep Vice President Mike Pence as his running mate when he seeks re-election in November 2020.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Prime minister seeks to halt rise of measles after more than 230 cases in three monthsBoris Johnson will call on social media companies to do more to stop anti-vaccination messages spreading online as he visits a hospital in the south-west of England.The prime minister will lay out his plans to halt the resurgence of measles in the UK after more than 230 cases were diagnosed in the first quarter of the year. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    • Spurs manager fears club could lose Christian Eriksen• Pochettino wants longer window like other nationsMauricio Pochettino has described the decision to close the domestic summer transfer window in early August as a “massive mistake” and claims he has even persuaded Tottenham’s hard-nosed chairman, Daniel Levy, of the same thing. Pochettino could still lose Christian Eriksen to Real Madrid as the Spanish transfer window does not shut until 2 September. Were that to happen Pochettino would be unable to replace one of Tottenham’s key players until January at the earliest. Italy, France and Germany have the same deadline as Spain. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    President says bid would be ‘essentially a real estate deal'Danish semi-autonomous territory has said it is not for saleDonald Trump has confirmed he is considering an attempt to buy Greenland for strategic reasons, though he said the idea is “not No1 on the burner”. Related: 'Friends, you're going to love Greenland. I was there on 9/11' | Lawrence Douglas and Nancy Pick Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    President says bid would be ‘essentially a real estate deal'Danish semi-autonomous territory has said it is not for saleDonald Trump has confirmed he is considering an attempt to buy Greenland for strategic reasons, though he said the idea is “not No1 on the burner”. Related: 'Friends, you're going to love Greenland. I was there on 9/11' | Lawrence Douglas and Nancy Pick Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Blanco was the first elected female governor in Louisiana's history. She died Sunday after a long battle with cancer.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Parents say full extent of son’s injuries are still unknown after two operations but they are hopefulThe parents of a six-year-old boy who was allegedly thrown from a viewing platform at Tate Modern have said his condition is stable, but they still do not know the full extent of his injuries.In a statement thanking those who have donated to a crowdfunding appeal, they said: “Our son has already undergone two long and difficult operations … But he is alive, struggling with all his strength, and we remain hopeful. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Parents say full extent of son’s injuries are still unknown after two operations but they are hopefulThe parents of a six-year-old boy who was allegedly thrown from a viewing platform at Tate Modern have said his condition is stable, but they still do not know the full extent of his injuries.In a statement thanking those who have donated to a crowdfunding appeal, they said: “Our son has already undergone two long and difficult operations … But he is alive, struggling with all his strength, and we remain hopeful. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Canada said on Sunday that Britain's decision to strip Jack Letts - dubbed "Jihadi Jack" by the media - of his British citizenship was an attempt to shift responsibility for what to do with him onto Canada, where he also has citizenship.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Canada said on Sunday that Britain's decision to strip Jack Letts - dubbed "Jihadi Jack" by the media - of his British citizenship was an attempt to shift responsibility for what to do with him onto Canada, where he also has citizenship.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Latest: Islamic State claims Kabul wedding attack as Afghans question prospect of peace
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A wildfire sweeping across Gran Canaria in the Canary Islands led to the evacuation of 4,000 people on Sunday and officials warned tackling the blaze was being complicated by a combination of high temperatures, strong winds and low humidity.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Church should offer more open-ended resources such as meditation, discussion groups and even nature walks. Let teens come to God in their own way.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    With bloody murders and shock arrests, this was a week of gobsmacking action and genuine wins for our heroes. Will the whole system topple now?Spoiler alert: this recap is for people watching The Handmaid’s Tale, series three, on Channel 4 in the UK. Please do not add spoilers for later episodes in the series.Over the years, The Handmaid’s Tale has battered us down with disappointment after disappointment, to the point that an episode can be seen as light relief if it doesn’t include any rapes or beatings. So when an episode like this comes along that contains not one but two genuine wins for the heroes, we’re left blinking in shock. Two Commanders down, how many more to go? It’s not many, but it’s a start. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    President Donald Trump said he's looking into buying Greenland, but it's not a top priority.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    US President Donald Trump says he’s looking into stopping business with Chinese giant Huawei altogether, citing “national security threat.” It follows a report claiming Trump would grant Huawei a 90-day license extention. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    US President Donald Trump says he’s looking into stopping business with Chinese giant Huawei altogether, citing “national security threat.” It follows a report claiming Trump would grant Huawei a 90-day license extention. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Holy moly ... after that trial and the least subtle prison break ever, how much more can our blood pressure take, ‘Darkers?Man alive. Ross is at the bottom of an empty well! With Ned hanged and Demelza distracted by the stealing of the ore, who will save him now? Although perhaps a more realistic question is: how much more fake jeopardy can our blood pressure take, ‘Darkers? I don’t know if I can stand much more of this. Which is just as well, as there are only two episodes to go.There has been a tension this series between what’s going on (the plot) and what we really care about (the characters). Most of the plot has been about the characters we care about the least. This came to a head in this tricky outing. The trouble with the Ned storyline is that no one apart from Ross likes Ned. We don’t give a fig if falsehood and tyranny are vanquished; we just want Ross and Demelza to be happy. Plus, Ned was so evidently set up that there was no point resisting in the first place. And the bit with the pardon-that-wasn’t-a-pardon was pointless melodrama. “Oh, good, you’re just going to hang me and not disembowel and behead me. Thanks, prime minister.” Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The world’s top sides are so evenly matched a referee’s whim or the bounce of the ball can settle a match’s outcomeTwo warm-up games down, two to go for England on the long, meandering road to Japan. If their two August warm-up games against Wales have reinforced anything, it is the folly of arriving at too many hard and fast conclusions a month before the World Cup kicks off. Which is fortunate for England: fail to improve on certain aspects of Saturday’s 13-6 defeat in Cardiff and they will fall well short in Japan.In no particular order, they leaked a whole heap of penalties, lost the aerial battle and the breakdown, saw their driving maul neutered at a critical moment late on and generally lacked the snap and crackle they had displayed in the reverse fixture. So why did Eddie Jones look so content? Possibly because he now knows that, even when England are playing poorly with a weakened side in a hostile stadium, none of the world’s top teams can swat them easily aside. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The UN and NGOs put out a humanitarian appeal for $770m at the start of the year and have received less than $180m.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Tiger Woods won't have a chance to defend his title next week at the Tour Championship, falling well outside the top 30 in the FedEx Cup standings.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A South Dakota mom delivered triplets –two girls and a boy – after being rushed to the hospital for what she thought were kidney stones.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Monday: Australia must diversify its allies as US military might weakens, report says. Plus: Australia maintains 1-0 lead in AshesGood morning, this is Stephen Smiley bringing you the main stories and must-reads on Monday 19 August. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Heavy rain failed to keep hundreds of thousands of protesters from swarming Hong Kong streets Sunday to rally against the Beijing government.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Which Premier League player should be in the next Harry Potter movie? Which team already looks rudderless? Find out in Garth Crooks' team of the week.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Swift's highly anticipated seventh studio album "Lover" is just around the corner.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    French President Emmanuel Macron will attempt to convince Russia to accept Ukraine’s overtures of dialogue when he meets Vladimir Putin for talks on Monday ahead of a G7 summit.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    French President Emmanuel Macron will attempt to convince Russia to accept Ukraine’s overtures of dialogue when he meets Vladimir Putin for talks on Monday ahead of a G7 summit.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A judge spared a drug dealer from jail after hearing his alopecia had led to a life of ridicule and that selling drugs was a way of making friends. Cameron Bridges started selling drugs after being frozen out by his peers for much of his school life and to support his £150 a day cocaine habit. Bridges, of Polperro, Cornwall, admitted possession of cocaine, ketamine and cannabis with intent to supply, as well as possession charges and assaulting an emergency worker. Truro Crown Court heard the 20 year old's life spiralled out of control until his arrest in May when he sought help and is now drug free. Chris Andrews, defending, said:"At school he suffered five years of ridicule and bullying and sat out PE while other children laughed at him. "It will come as no surprise that at 12 he started smoking cannabis and at 15 he started using cocaine behind his parents' backs. Drugs gave him something he's never had before, a circle of friends and all of a sudden a social group. Suddenly people rang him and he was in demand." Judge Simon Carr jailed him for two years, suspended for two years, and ordered him on a six month drug rehab order, a curfew and 150 hours of unpaid work.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Stokes hit 115 as England declared on 258-5
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    We think of ourselves as both an immigrant ethnic group and a racially oppressed minority. After El Paso, that is a luxury we can't afford.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Iceland on Sunday honoured the passing of Okjokull, its first glacier lost to climate change, as scientists warn that some 400 others on the subarctic island risk the same fate. As the world recently marked the warmest July ever on record, a bronze plaque was mounted on a bare rock in a ceremony on the former glacier in western Iceland, attended by local researchers and their peers at Rice University in the United States who initiated the project. Iceland's Prime Minister Katrin Jakobsdottir and former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson also attended the event, as well as hundreds of scientists, journalists and members of the public who trekked to the site.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Iceland on Sunday honoured the passing of Okjokull, its first glacier lost to climate change, as scientists warn that some 400 others on the subarctic island risk the same fate. As the world recently marked the warmest July ever on record, a bronze plaque was mounted on a bare rock in a ceremony on the former glacier in western Iceland, attended by local researchers and their peers at Rice University in the United States who initiated the project. Iceland's Prime Minister Katrin Jakobsdottir and former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson also attended the event, as well as hundreds of scientists, journalists and members of the public who trekked to the site.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    England fast bowler has hit 19 batsmen since his international bow and rammed the concussion debate into the spotlight with the ball that struck Steve Smith on the neck at Lord’sIn the end it took an act of God to stop Jofra Archer. A thick bank of black cloud blew over the Grand Stand at a quarter-past-seven and in the twilight of Sunday night the umpires rightly decided that it was all of a sudden so dark that the Australian batsmen could not safely face him any more, if they ever could safely face him at all. Archer had already hit Marnus Labuschagne, Tim Paine and Matthew Wade earlier in the day, and that was in bright sunlight. So Archer slapped on his hat, turned his back from the crease, then strolled off to field at mid-on, despondent. Force majeure. Who knew there was a superior force out there?Archer bowled 44 overs in this match and by the time they were over he had proved himself the most lethal fast bowler in the world. On Sunday he cracked open the Australian second innings, had David Warner caught at slip, Usman Khawaja caught behind and, later in the day, removed Paine too. But it was not just the wickets. Archer has hit 19 batsmen in the body and head in the short time he has been playing international cricket. Right now he is averaging a strike every 10 overs or so. His bowling is a test not just for Australia’s batsman but for the way the game handles these blows, too. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Reports that Donald Trump sees Greenland as a good real estate prospect were no joke, with the White House economic adviser confirming that the US president is really mulling the purchase of world’s largest island. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Type 64 car built in 1939 is not technically a Porsche but was still expected to fetch a high price at Sotheby’s Monterey saleA car designed by Ferdinand Porsche in Nazi Germany that was expected to sell for millions failed to find a buyer at an auction in California on Saturday, amid scenes of confusion and derision. Related: James Bond Aston Martin DB5 sold at auction for £5.2m Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Hundreds of thousands march for democracy in latest Hong Kong protest against China  USA TODAYHong Kong protests enter 11th consecutive weekend: Follow live  CNNProtests in Hong Kong reach its 11th week  ABC NewsCan Hong Kong Avoid Becoming Tiananmen?  The New York TimesHong Kong protests present Trump, Xi with painful choices | TheHill  The HillView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Maddy Freking became the sixth girl to pitch at the Little League World Series on Sunday and more than held her own on the mound.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Chelsea’s 1-1 draw with Leicester again emphasised that it will take time before Lampard’s team find their best formFrank Lampard always envisaged enduring occasions such as this. He knew there would be periods of frustration mixed in with all the elation whipped up by his return to a club where he is so cherished, games where his team are exposed as a work in progress when that gap to the top two seems to gape ever larger. That acceptance does not make it any easier to take. The frown he wore at the end of his homecoming betrayed underlying concerns.A week into his competitive tenure and contests continue to follow a familiar pattern. For a quarter of an hour here he had thrilled from the sidelines as his Chelsea team showcased everything dazzling he hopes to promote, the hosts vibrant and inventive, gloriously energetic and incisive. And yet, just as at Manchester United and against Liverpool in Istanbul, it all rather fizzled out with the initiative passed up and, steadily, momentum switching. By the end, it was an impressive Leicester who were threatening to prevail. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Trump calls Juan Williams 'so pathetic' and 'always nasty'  Washington ExaminerGoogle employees urge company to stop work with ICE, CBP  Fox NewsTrump calls Juan Williams 'pathetic,' 'always nasty and wrong' | TheHill  The Hill'Fox is different': Donald Trump slams Fox News, questions favored network's poll  USA TODAYSeveral states challenge Trump admin 'public charge' rule  Fox NewsView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A U.S. Customs and Border Protection dog picked up on something strange Thursday night in a tractor-trailer shipment of jalapeno peppers at a San Diego crossing, the agency says in a release.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Afghan officials: Suicide bombing in crowded Kabul wedding hall kills 63 people, wounds 182
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow dismissed fears about a possible recession after a roller-coaster week for stocks.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Scientists fear all the island country's 400 glaciers will be gone by 2200.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Razak died after rescuing two children, including his son, who were trapped in the floodwaters in Kerala.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    As Donald Trump ramps up his reelection campaign for 2020, he is revivinging a controversial gripe held over from 2016: that voter fraud cost him support.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Blurry flashbacks and curious talking heads tell the story of an ambitious Maidenhead teen who went on to launch an empireActing is the most curious profession. What kind of actor gets tasked with simulating throwing up in a pub fireplace while playing a drunken, out-of-focus Mike Ashley at the denouement of a reconstructed corporate bonding bender? One who needs to change his agent, is my guess. In Sports Direct: Secrets of the Mega Sports Factory (Channel 5), there were multiple out-of-focus Mike Ashleys, like my worst nightmare, or like a knockoff Being John Malkovich with bad lenses. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    What is happening in Asssam?
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders unveiled Sunday a criminal justice overhaul to "reform every aspect of America's dysfunctional criminal justice system" by ending "for-profit greed" in the system, expanding inmates' rights and changing how policing works in the country.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A 29-year-old man died from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound in his Yuba City apartment during a standoff with police on Friday, according to a Yuba City police press release.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Even with a R-rating, the tween comedy 'Good Boys' pushed 'Furious' spinoff 'Hobbs & Shaw' to second place and beat out 'The Angry Birds Movie 2.'       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Protesters gathered outside Hong Kong’s government headquarters have peacefully dispersed after fellow demonstrators urged them to go home
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Hong Kong streets were turned into rivers of umbrellas as hundreds of thousands of people marched through heavy rain in the Chinese territory, where massive pro-democracy demonstrations have become a regular weekend activity
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Hundreds of thousands of anti-government protesters rallied peacefully in Hong Kong on Sunday, filling major thoroughfares under torrential downpours in the eleventh week of what have been often violent demonstrations in the Asian financial hub.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Italian Interior Minister Matteo Salvini is telling a Spanish humanitarian rescue boat with 107 migrants to go to Spain, not Italy
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Born August 18, 1936, Robert Redford's film career has spanned over 50 years. We're taking a look back on his time in front of and behind the camera.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The businessman offered him and his family an all-expenses paid trip after seeing his act of kindness.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Workers have erected a wooden wall around Mexico City’s iconic Angel of Independence monument after feminists defaced it with graffiti during a raucous protest over a string of alleged rapes by police
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Mexico City assesses monument damage after anti-rape march  ABC NewsMexico teen rape cases: Women protest against police violence  BBC NewsTV presenter punched live on air during protest  The IndependentNews reporter attacked by feminist hooligans then knocked out cold by thug at ‘gender violence’ protest in Mex  The SunWomen in Mexico City protest against alleged police rapes  ABC NewsView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Former Chicago Bears, Cincinnati Bengals and Green Bay Packers running back Cedric Benson has been confirmed as one of two people killed in a motorcycle accident in Austin, Texas, according to reports. The sports star was 36. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    England fall four wickets short of a remarkable victory in the second Ashes Test as Australia survive a tense final hour at Lord's.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating a "cluster" of lung illnesses linked to e-cigarette use after such cases were reported in 14 states.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Pelosi warns Mnuchin to stop 'illegal' $4.3B cut to foreign aid | TheHill  The HillWhite House to Proceed With Ending Some Foreign Aid Payments  BloombergView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The tourists became stranded due to a mudslide Friday, which damaged the only road in the park.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Spain on Sunday offered to allow a charity boat situated off the coast of Italy with more than 100 people on board to dock at the nearest Spanish port after the Open Arms charity rejected a plan to dock in Algeciras because it was too far away.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi appealed on Sunday for more humanitarian aid for Venezuelan refugees pouring into neighboring countries where they are overwhelming social services and sparking local tensions.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    An employee is entitled for annual leave salaries on the number of annual leave days which was not availed by him.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Gibraltar rejects U.S. attempt to seize Iranian oil tanker  Washington PostGibraltar rejects US pressure, says Iranian oil tanker free to go  USA TODAYIranians change name of seized Grace 1 oil tanker in DEFIANCE of US warrant  Express.co.ukGibraltar refuses US request to seize Iranian tanker  Al Jazeera EnglishIran News Update: Tanker Leaves Gibraltar After US Bid Rejected  BloombergView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The US president hints at a deal with the Taliban that could end Washington's longest military engagement abroad.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Trump administration’s Department of Justice is asking the Supreme Court to set a legal precedent that would enable employers to fire employees because they are transgender.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Government figures seek to play down predictions of food, medicine and fuel shortages in leaked documentOperation Yellowhammer: the key pointsDowning Street has reacted with fury to the leak of an official document predicting that a no-deal Brexit would lead to food, medicine and petrol shortages, with No 10 sources blaming the disclosure on a hostile former minister intent on ruining Boris Johnson’s trip to see EU leaders this week.The leaked document, detailing preparations under Operation Yellowhammer, argues that the most likely scenario is severe extended delays to medicine supplies and shortages of some fresh foods, combined with price rises, if there is a no-deal Brexit on 31 October. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Government figures seek to play down predictions of food, medicine and fuel shortages in leaked documentOperation Yellowhammer: the key pointsDowning Street has reacted with fury to the leak of an official document predicting that a no-deal Brexit would lead to food, medicine and petrol shortages, with No 10 sources blaming the disclosure on a hostile former minister intent on ruining Boris Johnson’s trip to see EU leaders this week.The leaked document, detailing preparations under Operation Yellowhammer, argues that the most likely scenario is severe extended delays to medicine supplies and shortages of some fresh foods, combined with price rises, if there is a no-deal Brexit on 31 October. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Police have arrested a total of five men over killing of 16-year-old Alex Smith last weekDetectives investigating the murder of a 16-year-old boy have made two further arrests.Alex Smith was stabbed repeatedly in Munster Square, Camden, north-west London, on 12 August after being chased by a group of people. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    More than 1,235 acres ravaged in less than 24 hours as officials warn blaze has 'great potential' to spread
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Indian authorities reimposed restrictions on movement in parts of Kashmir's biggest city, Srinagar, on Sunday after overnight clashes between residents and police in which dozens were injured, two senior officials and eyewitnesses said.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Wilfred Ndidi's header earns Leicester City a deserved point and denies Frank Lampard victory in his first game at Stamford Bridge as Chelsea boss.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Israeli forces opened fire at a group of Palestinian gunmen as they tried to cross the Gaza border, the military said on Sunday and Palestinian health officials said three of the men were killed.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Watch highlights as Australia were given a huge fright by a Ben Stokes century and another electric Jofra Archer spell before earning a draw against England on a gripping final day at Lord's.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Frank Lampard is still without a win three games into his tenure as Chelsea's head coach after a second half Wilfred Ndidi header canceled out an opener from Mason Mount to increase the pressure on the club's new boss. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Investigators say they are considering whether the attack in north London was a hate crime.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    You may grant a power of attorney to any person of your choice residing in the UAE to check if there is a lifetime ban on you entering the UAE.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Pilot cars began shepherding motorists through a previously-closed stretch of Alaska’s George Parks Highway for several hours Saturday after high winds and dry weather sparked six blazes.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Former running back Cedric Benson died Saturday night in a motorcycle accident, his attorney told USA TODAY Sports. Benson spent eight years in NFL.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Portugal's fuel-tanker drivers voted on Sunday to call off an indefinite strike, with their union agreeing to negotiate with employers in government-brokered talks due on Tuesday.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Police cite 'security concerns' in banning demonstration planned for Monday in Bulawayo.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Kashmir crisis: Residents unable to afford food  Al Jazeera EnglishView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    At least 40,000 homes in Oxfordshire affected after cooling towers brought downThe demolition of a disused power station’s cooling towers caused a power outage that affected 40,000 homes in Oxfordshire on Sunday, an energy company has confirmed.Scottish and Southern Electricity Networks (SSEN) had said that initial information suggested the demolition was not linked to the outage, but later admitted it was the cause. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Traders estimate 25,000 people have been affected on both sides of Kashmir.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Brain injury charity Headway says batsman should not have returned to pitch after being hitThe fallout from the sight of the great Australian batsman Steve Smith being felled by a 92.4 mph bouncer, which led to him being withdrawn on Sunday from the second Ashes Test at Lord’s, has reignited the debate about whether sport is wary enough about the dangers of concussion.On Saturday Smith had looked groggy and disorientated as he left the pitch after being hit by England’s Jofra Archer – yet he was soon given the all clear to continue after being checked by the Australian team doctor. However, when Smith woke up on Sunday he was suffering from dizzy spells and was quickly pulled out of the team with concussion. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Money will go to relatives of Andrew Harper as police continue to question suspectsMore than £90,000 has been raised in just 24 hours to support the family and widow of PC Andrew Harper as detectives continue to question 10 suspects including a 13-year-old boy.The 28-year-old officer, who got married four weeks ago, died from multiple injuries after being dragged by a van while investigating a reported burglary in the village of Bradfield Southend, Berkshire, on Thursday night. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Summerhall, EdinburghAhmed El Attar’s bruising two-hander dives into the long lead-up to 2011 in an attempt to determine what causes mass revoltWhat causes a people to rise up? Is it a simple trigger or a complex web of reasons? Where news reports prefer an easy cause-and-effect narrative, the reality is less straightforward.That’s the thinking behind Ahmed El Attar’s bruising two-hander. His own production for Cairo’s Temple theatre company is a theatrical collage that gives an impressionistic account of the driving forces behind Egypt’s revolution of 2011. He uses a striking visual metaphor: dressed in white, actors Ramsi Lehner and Nanda Mohammad stand stock still for the play’s 40-minute duration, staring straight ahead with a look somewhere between caution and terror. They are well advised to be alarmed; around their feet is a bed of nails, leaving no room for divergence, no chance of stepping out of line. Charlie Aström’s lighting glows bright – then brighter still. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Waiter shot dead for taking too long to make customer's sandwich  New York Post Waiter in France allegedly shot dead for being 'too slow with sandwich,' report says  Fox NewsFrench waiter shot dead for being 'too slow with sandwich', say witnesses  The GuardianFrench Waiter Shot Dead Over Long Wait for a Sandwich  SlateFrench Waiter Shot Dead Over Slow Sandwich Service, Witnesses Say  The New York TimesView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Donald Trump and Greenland
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The oil tanker is due to leave Gibraltar later on Sunday, Iran's ambassador to the UK says.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The oil tanker is due to leave Gibraltar later on Sunday, Iran's ambassador to the UK says.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Canada accuses UK of ‘offloading responsibilities’ over dual-national Isis recruitJack Letts, who left his home in Oxfordshire to join Isis five years ago, has been stripped of his British citizenship while being held in a Syrian prison.The move sparked a diplomatic row as Canada – where Letts qualifies for a passport through his father – accused the UK government of “offloading its responsibilities”. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Canada accuses UK of ‘offloading responsibilities’ over dual-national Isis recruitJack Letts, who left his home in Oxfordshire to join Isis five years ago, has been stripped of his British citizenship while being held in a Syrian prison.The move sparked a diplomatic row as Canada – where Letts qualifies for a passport through his father – accused the UK government of “offloading its responsibilities”. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    No-deal Brexit could cause UK food, fuel and medicine shortages  Al Jazeera EnglishNigel Farage delivers explosive reply to no deal Brexit report – 'Olly Robbins special'  Express‘They are not confident!’ Farage delivers stunning reply after interviewing Lib Dem MP  ExpressView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Officials say three Palestinians killed, one wounded, after overnight Israeli attacks in northern Gaza.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Guardian columnist says divisive rhetoric in politics and media is emboldening far rightThe Guardian columnist Owen Jones has said he believes he was targeted in an unprovoked late-night attack over the weekend because of his anti-fascist politics and warned that divisive rhetoric is emboldening some on the far right to become violent.The writer and activist was out celebrating his 35th birthday and was leaving a bar near King’s Cross at around 2am on Saturday morning when a group of men “charged out of the pub with military precision” and hit him from behind while he was saying goodbye to friends. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Italy's anti-establishment 5-Star Movement said on Sunday that Matteo Salvini, leader of the far-right League, was no longer a credible partner, apparently closing the door on any possibility of resurrecting the ruling coalition.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Gibraltar rejected a U.S. request to continue holding an Iranian supertanker detained on suspicion of attempting to breach global sanctions on Syria.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    • Winner Miller-Uibo will not compete in 200m in Doha• Johnson-Thompson impresses with third in long jumpThe biggest victories do not always come on pitch. Moments after Dina Asher-Smith finished second to Shaunae Miller-Uibo in a world-class 200m at the Birmingham Diamond League she received some golden news – the brilliant Miller-Uibo, who has not lost since 2017, would be running only the 400m at next month’s world championships rather than doubling up over 200m and 400m. Related: Nafissatou Thiam: ‘Seeing Katarina do well pushed me to go even further’ Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Reporters from Russia-1 tracked down the sender of the message, Capt. Anatoliy Botsanenko.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Security video on YouTube shows a Greater Rochester International Airport security worker laughing after she gave a man a note that read 'You ugly!!!'       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    An “instant party” in Texas ended with a car chase and several people shot, police say.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The parents of Jack Letts, dubbed Jihadi Jack, say the UK government is "shirking responsibility".
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Protesters 'caged inside homes' as public movement restriction enforced for third week
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A new report says that elderly people living in the UK suffer some of the highest levels of poverty in western Europe. The findings coincide with a Tory-linked policy paper that calls for the pension age to be raised to 75. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A new report says that elderly people living in the UK suffer some of the highest levels of poverty in western Europe. The findings coincide with a Tory-linked policy paper that calls for the pension age to be raised to 75. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Bill Maher Boycott Urged By Rep. Rashida Tlaib For His HBO Slam On Her Israel Boycott  DeadlineTlaib, Omar share image by artist once celebrated in Iran's Holocaust cartoon contest  Fox NewsAmerica & Israel: 'Special Relationship' Worth Preserving  National ReviewA lesson of the Trump, Tlaib, Omar, Netanyahu affair | TheHill  The HillOnce again, Israel fumbles its response to BDS | TheHill  The HillView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Kuwait's elderly ruler, Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber al-Sabah has recovered from a health setback and is "in a good condition now", the state news agency KUNA reported on Sunday.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Top Trump official was part of group that called undocumented immigrants 'invaders': report | TheHill  The HillTrump's Statue of Bigotry is not Cuccinelli's first neo-Confederate assault  The GuardianNew green card restrictions likely would've excluded Trump and Cuccinelli's ancestors | TheHill  The HillView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Jaitley was admitted on August 9 after he complained of uneasiness and weakness.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Let me show you..
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A young Red Sox fan, 9-year-old Henry Frasca, wrote a heartwarming letter to the Orioles' Chris Davis in April. The two linked up at Fenway Park.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Jihadi Jack's parents brand Sajid Javid a 'coward' over revoked citizenship  BBC NewsISIS suspect 'Jihadi Jack' has been stripped of his UK citizenship, officials say  CNNCanada slams UK decision to 'off-load' Islamist fighter  ReutersJihadi Jack: IS recruit Jack Letts loses UK citizenship  BBC NewsIsis suspect Jack Letts stripped of British citizenship – report  The GuardianView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Jose, give it a rest.How do you go from:Sueltame = Let goen = inbanda = bandTo: "get the f*** out of my life"
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Except you’ve only gone and proven YOU are the blind and stupid sheep. Baa baa baa is all you do all day long.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Jordan says Israel's attempts to change the historic and legal status quo of Al-Aqsa Mosque site should stop.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    To satisfy your curiosity Pentecostalism, Christianity.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Kuwaiti state media on Sunday reported Emir Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad Al-Sabah had "recovered", shortly after Iran's foreign minister indicated that the 90-year-old was unwell. The emir "has recovered from a setback and is in good health now", Kuwait's official news agency KUNA said, citing a palace statement, without specifying the nature of the "setback". Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif had earlier on Sunday wished Sheikh Sabah a "speedy recovery" after talking with the Gulf state's officials.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Kuwaiti state media on Sunday reported Emir Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad Al-Sabah had "recovered", shortly after Iran's foreign minister indicated that the 90-year-old was unwell. The emir "has recovered from a setback and is in good health now", Kuwait's official news agency KUNA said, citing a palace statement, without specifying the nature of the "setback". Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif had earlier on Sunday wished Sheikh Sabah a "speedy recovery" after talking with the Gulf state's officials.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    You're not Dominican. Slang is slang is for a reason. Idiot. Why do you have a new account to talk to me? You're looking a lot like my son's mother. You don't seem to understand "get the f*** out of my life" very well...Have more respect for yourself. You look like b*** right now..
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Just out of curiosity, which religion do you practice, Voodooism, Santeria or evangelical Christian?
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Iran appears to be preparing another satellite launch after twice failing this year to put one in orbit, despite U.S. accusations that the Islamic Republic's program helps it develop ballistic missiles. Satellite images of the Imam Khomeini Space Center in Iran's Semnan province this month show increased activity at the site, as heightened tensions persist between Washington and Tehran over its collapsing nuclear deal with world powers. While Iran routinely only announces such launches after the fact, that activity coupled with an official saying a satellite would soon be handed over to the country's Defense Ministry suggests the attempt will be coming soon.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Gran Canaria: Wildfires displace 4,000 on holiday island  BBC NewsCanary Islands authorities evacuate 4,000 as wildfire spreads  ReutersGran Canaria wildfires: Thousands forced to evacuate after 'shooting fireballs' horror  Express.co.ukGran Canaria wildfires – Hotels evacuated as 4,000 people told to flee as 1,000 firefighters and troops b  The SunWildfire prompts evacuations in Canary Islands  ReutersView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Sueltame = Let goen = inbanda = bandMaybe someone was just playing a joke on you.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Canary Islands regional president said the fires were out of control.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Canary Islands regional president said the fires were out of control.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Argentine opposition candidate, Alberto Fernandez, said that the country would struggle under present conditions to repay a loan to the International Monetary Fund and he would seek to renegotiate the repayment terms, according to an interview published on Sunday by the newspaper Clarin.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Open Arms migrant rescue ship rejects offer to dock in Spain citing dire situation onboard
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The deadliest attack of the year in Kabul bodes poorly for the US-Taliban deal  Vox.comAfghanistan wedding hall suicide bombing leaves at least 63 dead, more than 180 others wounded  Fox NewsAfghanistan: Bomb kills 63 at wedding in Kabul  BBC NewsSuicide-bomb at Kabul wedding leaves 63 dead and 182 wounded  The TelegraphAfghanistan bombing: Islamic State claims responsibility for bombing at Kabul wedding that killed 63  CBS NewsView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The 47-year-old rap star is one of the world's best-selling musicians, but at this stage of his career, Snoop has insisted he doesn't judge himself by how many albums he sells...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Fareed's take: How the US should leave Afghanistan  CNNView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Democratic presidential candidate says suspect who killed 22 people earlier this month was inspired by Trump’s rhetoricThe deaths of 22 people in the El Paso shooting earlier this month made clear “the real consequence and cost of Donald Trump”, Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke said on Sunday. Related: 'Rigging the game': Stacey Abrams kicks off campaign to fight voter suppression Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Democratic presidential candidate says suspect who killed 22 people earlier this month was inspired by Trump’s rhetoricThe deaths of 22 people in the El Paso shooting earlier this month made clear “the real consequence and cost of Donald Trump”, Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke said on Sunday. Related: 'Rigging the game': Stacey Abrams kicks off campaign to fight voter suppression Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Democratic presidential candidate says suspect who killed 22 people earlier this month was inspired by Trump’s rhetoricDemocratic presidential candidate Beto ORourke speaks to media and supporters during a campaign re-launch on 15 August in El Paso, Texas. Photograph: Sandy Huffaker/Getty ImagesThe deaths of 22 people in the El Paso shooting earlier this month made clear “the real consequence and cost of Donald Trump”, Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke said on Sunday.“From the outset of this campaign,” the Texan told NBC’s Meet the Press, “even before this campaign, I talked about how dangerous President Trump’s open racism is”.The former congressman cited remarks about Mexicans and Muslims and the burning of a mosque in Victoria, Texas “the day after he signs his executive order attempting to ban Muslim travel”.But he added: “It wasn’t until someone, inspired by Donald Trump, drove more than 600 miles, to my hometown, and killed 22 people in my community with a weapon of war, an AK-47, that he had no business owning, that no American should own, unless they are on a battlefield, engaged with the enemy.“It wasn’t until that moment that I truly understood how critical this moment is and the real consequence and cost of Donald Trump.”The mosque in Victoria burned down on 28 January 2017, the day after Trump signed an executive order which sought to temporarily bar from the US people from Iran, Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Libya and Somalia and to suspend or limit refugee admissions.The culprit in the fire was convicted in July 2018 and sentenced to 24 years in prison.The suspect in the shooting at an El Paso Walmart has been linked to a “manifesto” in which Trump policies were cited. He surrendered to police, who have said he has confessed to wanting to kill Mexicans.O’Rourke is off the pace in the Democratic field, sixth in the realclearpolitics.com national polling average. But his campaigning has gained new urgency and his attacks on Trump new vigour since the shooting in the city he represented in the US House from 2013 to the start of this year.This week, O’Rourke rejected suggestions he should drop out and run again for the Senate, having pushed the Republican Ted Cruz in 2018.O’Rourke told NBC he had seen danger inherent to Trump’s policies and behaviour again “yesterday, in Mississippi, in Canton, in a community where nearly 700 people working in chicken processing plants, one of the toughest jobs in America, were raided, detained, taken from their kids, humiliated, hogtied, for the crime of being in this country, doing a job that no one else will do”.Raids on Mississippi food processing plants by US Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, or Ice, caused national outcry this month. The operation against undocumented migrants was carried out just after the El Paso shooting and a controversial visit to the Texas city by Trump himself.Setting off for that visit, Trump told reporters those criticising him in connection with shootings “are political people. They’re trying to make points. In many cases they’re running for president, and they’re very low in the polls. A couple of them in particular, very low in the polls.”On NBC on Sunday, O’Rourke said: “There is a concerted, organised attack against immigrants, against people of colour, against those who do not look like or pray like or love like the majority in this country.“And this moment will define us one way or another. And if we do not wake up to it, I am convinced that we’ll lose America, this country, in our sleep. And we cannot allow that to happen.”
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    They are terrorists. Period
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    After the sacrifice narrative is when Abraham was told Sarah was with child in her advanced age. How can Isaac be Abraham's only son when Ishmael was the first born? Jews and their lies smh.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A brutal murder has blindsided a Russian village after a local teenager, who had been the pride of his class, hacked his entire family to death with an axe, so that they wouldn’t become upset by his suicide. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A brutal murder has blindsided a Russian village after a local teenager, who had been the pride of his class, hacked his entire family to death with an axe, so that they wouldn’t become upset by his suicide. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    He’s been exposed for the pathetic POS he is, a loser who has tried all his life to cross the US border but failed.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    That's slang for "leave me the f*** alone". You made a whole new profile just to talk to me? Should I be flattered or creeped out?
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    "Add a suicide or car bomber, a shooting or a couple of stabbings and this would complete Jose's feeling of brotherhood with recent Iraqi culture."But none of that happenned now did it? Why about the Boston Tea Party? A bunch of drunks sabotaging a legal shipment of tea. You got some nerve talking about other people when your culture is different but just as radical. Racist pr*k
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Graham: IG's report on Russia probe will be 'ugly and damning' for DOJ  Fox NewsLindsey Graham says Horowitz FISA report will be 'ugly and damning' for DOJ  Washington ExaminerLindsey Graham wants answers on role of CIA and Obama in Trump-Russia probe  Washington ExaminerView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    For Luis Joaquin Caro, who was about 2 years old when Argentina last defaulted on its debt in 2001, casting his vote for left-leaning Peronist candidate Alberto Fernandez in the country's recent primary election was a no-brainer.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    My man. I'm at the beach drinking rum listening to somebody disrespect my faith by calling it "mythology". This coming from a person that possibly believes in dinasours. The only thing saving you from me is that we are not having this discussion in person. Have a drink. Reeeeelax and chill. Have a good day.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Your blind as you are stupid az well az coloured and a dirty Jewish rat
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Campaigners say scanning faces as alternative to tickets would be intrusiveManchester City have been cautioned against the introduction of facial recognition technology, which a civil rights group says would risk “normalising a mass surveillance tool”.The reigning Premier League champions are considering introducing technology allowing fans to get into the Etihad Stadium more quickly by showing their faces instead of tickets, according to the Sunday Times. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Knowledge.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    What a surprise, MEMO fails to report on the IS claimed suicide attack in Kabul, killing 63 civilians. Would that possibly be because Islamic State is a Sunni/Salafi whatever the FVCK they wanna be, Islamist militant organisation? So, with the majority of workers at MEMO being Sunni, they don’t report about the attack, yet when it comes to Israel, they side with Iran, the Shiites (yep, that’s what they are).You lot are simply a joke.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    President Ghani condemns 'inhumane attack' claimed by ISIL after suicide bombing kills at least 63 and wounds 182.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    As the U.S. grapples with a rash of mass shootings, families are left to wonder what prompted the violence. But many times there are no clear answers.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    What a surprise, MEMO fails to report on the IS claimed suicide attack in Kabul, killing 63 civilians. Would that possibly be because Islamic State is a Sunni/Salafi whatever the FVCK they wanna be, Islamist militant organisation? So, with the majority of workers at MEMO being Sunni, they don’t report about the attack, yet when it comes to Israel, they side with Iran, the Shiites (yep, that’s what they are).You lot are just a joke.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The infant was left in a wooded area in suburban Washington on a 90-degree day without so much as a diaper, according to police.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    More of your pathetic fairytales, care to give a reliable respect news source? LOL.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Many Brexiters, including the prime minister, are in denial about the cruelty that their choices have already inflicted on millions of peopleThe Conservative party is in the habit of seeing the European Union as something that was inflicted on Britain and Brexit as self-defence. Eurosceptics struggle to perceive any aggression in the act of leaving the EU. But for citizens of other European countries the referendum felt profoundly hostile. How could it be taken any other way? Control over immigration was a centrepiece of the leave campaign. Xenophobia was an active ingredient and without it the result might have been different. Since then many efforts have been made to regularise the position of EU citizens in UK law but the underlying condition of anxiety persists.Last week, the Home Office announced that over one million people have been granted “settled status” – the new legal category that maintains rights of work and residence in the UK. More than 50,000 people applied in the first weekend after the scheme was launched in March. The Home Office advertises that number as if it describes enthusiasm for a popular new product and not a desperate dash for security. The total number of EU nationals in the UK is around 3 million. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Yet another pathetic fairytale, care to give a reliable respect news source? LOL.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Let's see if she can provide a respectable source (sarcasm), LOL.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Thousands arrested under controversial Public Safety Act and flown out of Kashmir as jails run out of capacity.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Obviously no source just another one of your fictitious post, anyone with a modicum of dignity would be embarrassed but not you.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Perhaps you’re blind, as well as stupid, because I clearly stated that it is to the exasperation of your suicide buddy Helen.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The tanker, now flying the Iranian flag, is preparing to depart the Mediterranean port, raising the question of what further action the United States may take.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    So bigoted that you can't even admit a simple mistake. That is sad, but typical. You keep saying "Memorandum" when what you obviously mean is the "Mandate" which you misquote
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Before Yemen's war broke out four years ago Ali Muhammad used to cross the border into Saudi Arabia to work, joining thousands of other Yemenis from his poor, mountainous region.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Chunks of falling glacier caused a massive wave that came straight at a pair of kayakers in Alaska.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Chunks of falling glacier caused a massive wave that came straight at a pair of kayakers in Alaska.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    US president Donald Trump ramped up his attacks on the “failing New York Times” on Sunday, accusing the paper of engaging in a “Racism Witch Hunt” following leaked comments from the news outlet’s executive editor. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    US president Donald Trump ramped up his attacks on the “failing New York Times” on Sunday, accusing the paper of engaging in a “Racism Witch Hunt” following leaked comments from the news outlet’s executive editor. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Gibraltar says US sanctions on Iran are not applicable in the European Union.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Invitation lists former vice president with 'special guests' Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Beijing wants global companies to back its power over the city, even as their workers join protests calling for greater say in the fate of their home.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Thousands of protesters filled the streets of Hong Kong on Sunday in what appeared to be the largest turnout in weeks.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Wolverhampton Wanderers defender Romain Saiss believes Morocco paid the price for their laid-back approach in games against supposed smaller countries at the Africa Cup of Nations (AFCON)...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Alberto Rivas — a Superior Court judge in Middlesex County, New Jersey — is facing charges of violating the judicial code.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The company's thinking on the deal is "fluid" and it is considering several timetables.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Bangladesh Fire: Thousands Left Homeless After Shanties Burn In Dhaka Slum  NPRBangladesh fire leaves thousands homeless after blaze destroys slum  Guardian NewsBangladesh fire: Thousands of shacks destroyed in Dhaka slum  BBC NewsBangladesh slum fire: Thousands left homeless in Dhaka  Al Jazeera EnglishBangladesh slum fire leaves 10,000 people homeless  CNNView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Heads up, Las Vegas travelers: Hard Rock Hotel & Casino will shut down for eight months of renovations in 2020. It'll reopen as a Virgin Hotel.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Foreign workers know the rules when they come to Israel. They are in Israel to work and do not attain residency status for themselves or their children. So when their visas expire so does their and their children's permission to stay and live in Israel end.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Hundreds of thousands of anti-government protesters rallied peacefully in Hong Kong on Sunday, in the eleventh week of what have been often violent demonstrations in the Asian financial hub.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Russian health workers say they weren't warned patients were coming from nuclear accident site  Fox NewsNuclear explosion Russia 2019: Putin’s DOOMSDAY WEAPON goes wrong - deaths  Express.co.uk'A cover-up just like Chernobyl' Doctors undergo urgent tests after treating blast victims  Express.co.ukWhy Putin’s Nuclear-Powered Superweapon Went Up in Smoke  BloombergThe nuclear arms race is back … and ever more dangerous now  The GuardianView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Iceland commemorates first glacier that 'died' by climate change  Al Jazeera EnglishIceland's Okjokull glacier commemorated with plaque  BBC NewsScientists bid farewell to the first Icelandic glacier lost to climate change. If more melt, it can be disastrous  CNNIceland bids farewell to first glacier lost to climate change  Aljazeera.com‘Only you know if we did it’: Scientists write dire letter to the future about climate change  ThinkProgressView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Italy's 5-Star says Salvini no longer a credible partner  ReutersItaly's Salvini lets 27 teenagers off Open Arms migrant ship  BBC NewsSpain offers port to stranded migrants, Italy's Salvini claims victory  ReutersSalvini wants to lead Italy. He may be about to get the chance  The Guardian'Desperation has its limits': Refugees leap out of rescue boat and try to swim to Italy after being stuck at sea for days  The IndependentView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Neil Campbell rode a £15,000 custom bike released from the back of a speeding PorscheA British man has set a new cycling speed record of more than 174mph on a £15,000 bike released from the back of a Porsche as it hurtled down a runway.Architect Neil Campbell, 45, broke the previous record of 167mph (268.83km/h) using an elongated, custom-built bike based on the design of a tandem. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Neil Campbell rode a £15,000 custom bike released from the back of a speeding PorscheA British man has set a new cycling speed record of more than 174mph on a £15,000 bike released from the back of a Porsche as it hurtled down a runway.Architect Neil Campbell, 45, broke the previous record of 167mph (268.83km/h) using an elongated, custom-built bike based on the design of a tandem. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The attack goes to the heart of the Afghan capital’s entertainment scene, which revolves around massive weddings.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The targeting of a festive event attended by women and children struck at the heart of the Afghan capital’s lively, family-oriented social scene. 
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    An estimated quarter of the population fill downtown park and surrounding streetsHong Kong’s dilemma: fight or resist peacefullyAn estimated 1.7 million people in Hong Kong – a quarter of the population – defied police orders to stage a peaceful march after a rally in a downtown park, after two months of increasingly violent clashes that have prompted severe warnings from Beijing and failed to win concessions from the city’s government.Huge crowds filled Victoria Park on Sunday afternoon and spilled on to nearby streets, forcing police to block traffic in the area. Torrential rain came down an hour into the rally, turning the park into a sea of umbrellas. At the same time, protesters walked towards Central, the heart of Hong Kong’s business district, and surrounded government headquarters. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    An estimated quarter of the population fill downtown park and surrounding streetsHong Kong’s dilemma: fight or resist peacefullyAn estimated 1.7 million people in Hong Kong – a quarter of the population – defied police orders to stage a peaceful march after a rally in a downtown park, after two months of increasingly violent clashes that have prompted severe warnings from Beijing and failed to win concessions from the city’s government.Huge crowds filled Victoria Park on Sunday afternoon and spilled on to nearby streets, forcing police to block traffic in the area. Torrential rain came down an hour into the rally, turning the park into a sea of umbrellas. At the same time, protesters walked towards Central, the heart of Hong Kong’s business district, and surrounded government headquarters. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Full Kudlow: 'I Sure Don't See A Recession' | Meet The Press | NBC News  NBC NewsAug. 18, 2019 - Larry Kudlow, Beto O'Rourke and Mark Sanford  NBCNews.comView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    White House offers reassurances amid recession fears as 2020 candidates sound alarm | TheHill  The HillPresident Trump's economic and trade advisers sought to quell fears of a looming recession Sunday morning after a week of turmoil in the markets that has ...View full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Rosalind Crowther of CARE International on the need to protect humanitariansAround the world, humanitarian aid workers operate in dangerous and difficult environments and here in South Sudan we know that many aid workers and peacekeepers have lost their lives while trying to protect and assist South Sudanese communities.Among them have been women who play a vital role in every aspect of crisis response, and particularly in preventing, responding to, and working with survivors of gender-based violence. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    You seem confused. I didn't erroneously claim anything, it's right there in the Memorandum. The situation in what was delineated by the Brits as Palestine changed dramatically after 1922.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Thousands of pounds are donated to a crowdfunding page set up to support Andrew Harper's family.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints issued a warning against coffee and vaping despite the fancy names and alluring flavors.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Royal Albert Hall, LondonCelebrating the 200th anniversary of Queen Victoria’s birth, Stephen Hough played Mendelssohn’s Piano Concerto No 1 on the monarch’s own piano with fuss-free finesseFrom sewers to Christmas trees, we owe a lot to the Victorians. But music has always been a moot point, the dearth of great homegrown composers obscuring 19th-century Britain’s energetic musical life. Queen Victoria and Prince Albert were arguably the period’s most famous music lovers, though, so this prom celebrating the 200th anniversary of their births had plenty of material with which to tackle the old “land without music” epithet.Arthur Sullivan’s Victoria and Merrie England suite was not a promising start. Written for Queen Victoria’s diamond jubilee celebrations, this is blandly jaunty stuff. Even Ádám Fischer’s sprightly conducting of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment couldn’t prevent it being dangerously tasteful. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Brexit: No-deal dossier shows worst-case scenario - Gove  BBC NewsNow we know the cost of no deal, MPs must do whatever it takes  The GuardianGovernment urged to bring forward No Deal planning campaign to counter "scaremongering" in Yellowhammer document  Telegraph.co.ukGove: No-deal Brexit will mean 'bumps in the road'  ReutersNumber 10 blames Philip Hammond's camp for leaking 'scaremongering' Project Fear 2.0 dossier  Daily MailView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Omar al-Bashir, the ousted former president of Sudan, is expected to stand in court on Monday for the first stage of a corruption trial which could see him jailed for many years. Bashir took power in a 1989 coup but was deposed in April after mass protests and security forces deciding to withdraw support for his brutal regime, which was behind an alleged genocidal campaign in the Darfur region. The 75-year-old former dictator is in prison awaiting the trail, where he faces allegations of possessing foreign currency, corruption and receiving gifts illegally. Human rights groups and relatives of Bashir's victims also want to see him stand trial at the International Criminal Court in the Hague for his role in the genocide of around 300,000 people in Darfur.  "While this trial is a positive step towards accountability for some of his alleged crimes, he remains wanted for heinous crimes committed against the Sudanese people," said Joan Nyanyuki, Amnesty International's East Africa director.   It comes as Sudan prepares to celebrate a historic deal between generals and protest leaders for a transition to civilian rule, which many hope will bring increased freedom and prosperity. During a ceremony to be held at a hall by the Nile in the capital Khartoum, members of the Transitional Military Council and protest leaders are expected to sign documents defining a 39-month transition. But the road to democracy remains fraught with obstacles, even if the mood was celebratory as foreign dignitaries as well as thousands of citizens from all over Sudan converged for the occasion. The deal reached on August 4 - the Constitutional Declaration - brought an end to nearly eight months of upheaval that led to the ousting of Bashir.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A police chief says she would like to find Lucas Dobson alive but is growing increasingly concerned.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Military rulers to also announce two more of its five members before both sides jointly choose a final civilian member.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Gabbard's record on Syria, through it may appear as 'pro-peace' on the surface, actually aligns with regime propaganda.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A no-deal Brexit will bring "bumps in the road", Michael Gove admits, as a leaked government document warns of food and drug shortages.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Daesh claimed the terror act that claimed at least 63 lives.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Gibraltar on Sunday rejected the United States' latest request not to release a seized Iranian supertanker, clearing the way for the vessel to set sail after being detained last month for allegedly attempting to breach European Union sanctions on Syria. The ship was expected to leave Sunday night, according to Hamid Baeidinejad, Iran's ambassador to Britain, who issued a statement on Twitter.  The tanker's release comes amid growing tension between Iran and the West after President Donald Trump pulled Washington out of Tehran's nuclear deal with world powers over a year ago. Shortly after the tanker's detention in early July near Gibraltar - a British overseas territory - Iran seized the British-flagged oil tanker Stena Impero, which remains held by the Islamic Republic. Analysts had said the Iranian ship's release by Gibraltar could see the Stena Impero go free. Gibraltar's government said Sunday it was allowing the Iranian tanker's release because "The EU sanctions regime against Iran - which is applicable in Gibraltar - is much narrower than that applicable in the US." In a last-ditch effort to stop the release, the U.S. unsealed a warrant Friday to seize the vessel and its cargo of 2.1 million barrels of light crude oil, citing violations of U.S. sanctions as well as money laundering and terrorism statutes. U.S. officials told reporters that the oil aboard the ship was worth some $130 million and that it was destined for a designated terror organization to conduct more terrorism. The unsealed court documents argued that Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps are the ship's true owners through a network of front companies. Authorities in Gibraltar said Sunday that, unlike in the U.S., the Iran's Revolutionary Guard is not designated a terrorist organization under EU, U.K. or Gibraltar law. The Iranian ship was detained while sailing under a Panamanian flag with the name Grace 1. As of Sunday, it had been renamed the Adrian Darya 1 and had hoisted an Iranian flag. Workers were seen painting the new name on the side of the ship Saturday. Iran has not disclosed the Adrian Darya 1's intended destination and has denied it was ever sailing for Syria. The chief minister of Gibraltar, Fabian Picardo, said he had been assured in writing by the Iranian government that the tanker wouldn't unload its cargo in Syria. Baeidinejad, Iran's ambassador to Britain, said in a series of tweets that "round-the-clock efforts to carry out port formalities and deploy the full crew onto the ship" had taken place since Gibraltar lifted the vessel's detention Thursday. The Astralship shipping agency in Gibraltar, which has been hired to handle paperwork and arrange logistics for the Adrian Darya 1, had told The Associated Press that a new crew of Indian and Ukrainian nationals were replacing the sailors on board.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Britain will face shortages of fuel, food and medicine if it leaves the European Union without a transition deal, according to leaked official documents reported by the Sunday Times whose interpretation was immediately contested by ministers.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Britain will face shortages of fuel, food and medicine if it leaves the European Union without a transition deal, according to leaked official documents reported by the Sunday Times whose interpretation was immediately contested by ministers.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Sixteen southern Africa countries say US and EU economic sanctions are harming the region.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Kudlow pointed to strong retail sales and low unemployment as signs that the U.S. economy remained strong.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Not your father's Peronists: Why Macri flopped with young Argentines  ReutersArgentina's economy minister resigns as peso sheds value  BBC NewsArgentina Faces Fresh Turmoil From Resignation, Debt Downgrades  BloombergPlunging peso, grinding poverty: Argentina hears echoes of 2001 crisis  The GuardianArgentina Treasury minister resigns, says 'significant renewal' needed amid economic crisis  ReutersView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    At least 10,000 people are homeless after a massive fire swept through a crowded slum in the Bangladesh capital and destroyed thousands of shanties, officials said Sunday. The fire broke out at in Dhaka's Mirpur neighbourhood late on Friday and razed around 2,000 mostly tin shacks, fire services official Ershad Hossain told AFP. Many residents -- largely low-income garment factory workers -- were not in the slum as they had left their homes to celebrate the Muslim Eid al-Adha holiday with their families.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    (Bloomberg) -- Life just got a whole lot tougher for Argentina’s Mauricio Macri a week after his shock primary-election defeat sent markets into a tailspin.The embattled president is suddenly grappling with the resignation of his economy minister and a double downgrade to the nation’s debt. Meanwhile, his opponent Alberto Fernandez, now favorite to win the presidency on Oct. 27, is calling on Macri to renegotiate the terms of a record $56 billion credit line with the International Monetary Fund.The slew of negative headlines may unleash a fresh bout of market turmoil after a brief respite at the end of last week. Argentina’s global bonds will be the first to react, while the nation’s currency and stock markets remain closed on Monday due to a local holiday.“This will inject more uncertainty,” said Nader Naeimi, the head of dynamic markets at AMP Capital Investors Ltd. in Sydney. “It puts a huge question mark over the creditworthiness of the country and is likely to further pressure the peso and Argentine bonds. We are staying out.”Economy Minister Nicolas Dujovne, who led bailout negotiations between Argentina and the IMF last year, stepped down on Saturday, saying in a letter to Macri that the country needs “significant renewal in the economic area.” Hernan Lacunza, economic minister for the province of Buenos Aires, will replace him.Dujovne’s resignation came a day after Argentina’s credit profile was cut deeper into junk territory by Fitch Ratings and S&P Global Ratings. Both cited the possibility of a sovereign debt default.IMF and DefaultThe IMF bailout had been instrumental in Macri’s strategy to stabilize the peso and ensure the country’s solvency. Yet, in an interview with La Nacion published Sunday, Fernandez said the deal needs to be reviewed because Argentina isn’t meeting the targets it agreed upon. He added that it’s “impossible” to repay the IMF on time, and that the only solution is to reschedule payments, according to the newspaper.In a separate interview with Clarin, Fernandez had a mixed message about the possibility of default. While saying the sensible thing is for Argentina to keep paying its obligations, he added that the country already finds itself in default conditions, as signaled by bond prices.Argentines Reflect on Last Week’s Election Results, Market ShockThe implied chance that Argentina will miss a debt payment, as measured by credit default swaps, soared last week. The Merval stock index lost 45% in dollar terms in the five days through Friday, bond prices tumbled about 30% and the peso weakened 18%.“While Argentina has been trading at distressed price levels already, we expect further downside on this news as it highlights an increased likelihood of a credit event,” Citigroup Inc. strategists including Dirk Willer wrote in a report.(Updates with Fernandez comments from seventh paragraph.)\--With assistance from Dana El Baltaji, Abeer Abu Omar and Jorgelina do Rosario.To contact the reporters on this story: Justin Carrigan in Dubai at jcarrigan@bloomberg.net;Walter Brandimarte in Brasilia at wbrandimarte@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Justin Carrigan at jcarrigan@bloomberg.net, Dana El Baltaji, Ros KrasnyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Voices from Hong Kong as thousands of people hold another day of pro-democracy protests.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Americans who vote to re-elect President Donald Trump in 2020 are, at best, "looking the other way on racism," said Democratic hopeful Pete Buttigieg.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Is your information safe? The skyrocketing number of data breaches is cause for concern.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    In a city this polluted, the sprawling Chapultepec Park is a lifeline to nature and clean air.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Initiative will run until the end of September.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Dina Asher-Smith underlines why is she seen as a World Championships medal contender with an impressive display in the 200m at the Birmingham Grand Prix.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The supermarket's Irish business reminds British suppliers they are expected to pay EU import tariffs.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Tom, 17, went through a 10-week course involving therapy, outdoor activities – and no phones or coffeeWhen gaming addiction took hold of Tom, 17, he would stay up all night glued to his computer. He stopped going to school and, despite his exams approaching, the only thought on his mind was how long the new game he had purchased was taking to download.Then one day, after refusing to leave his bedroom for months, he decided to get help. He found very few places in Britain offering much in terms of treatment, but a psychologist suggested he go to the Yes We Can clinic, Europe’s only addiction treatment centre for young people, almost 300 miles away in the Netherlands. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Addicted teenagers travelling to overseas clinics as there are no NHS facilities to treat themTeenagers addicted to gaming are travelling to private clinics overseas for treatment due to a lack of services in England and Wales to tackle the growing problem, the Guardian has learned.There are no NHS facilities to treat gaming addiction, which was listed and defined as a condition in the 11th edition of International Classification of Diseases. It means people are having to seek treatment privately or travel abroad. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    An outbreak of HIV among homeless people and drug users in Glasgow is the worst in the UK for 30 years.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Also, the launchers are especially designed with software such that it can accommodate a wide range of weapons; the launchers can house one SM-2, SM-3 or SM-6, ASROCs and up to four ESSMs due to the missile’s smaller diameter, Raytheon developers explain.Navy developers of the new high-tech, stealthy USS Zumwalt destroyer are widening the mission envelope for the ship, exploring new ammunition for its guns and preparing to fire its first missiles next year.The US Navy’s stealthy destroyer will fire an Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile and SM-2 in 2019 from its Mk 57 Vertical Launch Systems, marking the first time the new ship will fire weapons as part of its ongoing combat activation process.The Navy is exploring a new range of weapons for its stealthy USS Zumwalt destroyer to better prepare the ship for future warfare against technically advanced enemies.Recommended: North Korea’s Most Lethal Weapon Isn’t Nukes. Recommended: 5 Worst Guns Ever Made.Recommended: The World’s Most Secretive Nuclear Weapons Program.“The Navy is in the process of updating required documents to support new surface strike requirements,” according to Navy statements briefed at the service’s Sea Air and Space Annual Symposium by Zumwalt program manager Capt. Kevin Smith.(This first appeared several years ago.)The new ship, engineered with a sleek, radar-evading design, was initially conceived of in terms of primarily engineering a shallow-water land attack platform. While the ship was envisioned as a multi-mission platform at its inception, current emerging threats and new technology have led Navy strategists to scope a wider strategic view for the ship.In particular, given the rapid evolution of targeting technology and advanced long-range precision weaponry, particularly those being developed by near-peer adversaries, the strategic calculus informing maritime warfare is changing quickly.Long-range strike technology, coupled with advanced seekers, electromagnetic weapons and higher-resolution sensors, quite naturally, create the need for greater stand-off ranges; such a technical phenomenon is a key element of the Navy’s current “distributed lethality” strategy designed to better prepare the Navy for modern, open blue-water combat operations against a technologically advanced adversary.Part of the initial vision for this ship, which is still very much part of its equation, is to engineer a ship able to detect mines. For this reason, the ship has been architected with a shallow draft, enabling it to operate closer to shore than most deep water surface ships.At the same time, threat assessment experts, strategists and Navy weapons developers also heavily emphasize the growing need for the ship to succeed in the event of major nation-state force-on-force maritime warfare.In preparation for all of this, the ship is now going through combat activation in San Diego, Calif., to pave the way toward preparing the weapons systems for the ship’s planned move to operational status in 2020, Navy officials say.This process will also carefully refine many of the ship’s other technologies, such as its advanced Integrated Power System and Total Ship Computing Environment, multi-function, volume-search SPY-3 radar and sonar systems.The activation process for USS Zumwalt development includes many technology assessments, such as calm and heavy weather examinations to further verify the ship’s stability.Many of the weapons systems are being assessed and refined on board a specially configured unmanned test ship. The remote- controlled vessel continues to be involved in integration testing with the SM-2 and other weapons.The USS Zumwalt is built with a high-tech, long-range, BAE-built Advanced Gun System designed to find and hit targets with precision from much farther ranges than existing deck-mounted ship guns.Most deck mounted 5-inch guns currently on Navy ships are limited to firing roughly 8-to-10 miles at targets within the horizon or what’s called line of sight. The Advanced Gun System, however, is being developed to fire rounds beyond-the-horizon at targets more than three times that distance.The Navy had been planning to have the gun fire a Long-Range Land Attack Projectile, but is now exploring different ammunition options for, among other things, cost issues, Navy leaders said.The Navy is also currently evaluating potential SM-6 integration for the USS Zumwalt. The SM-6 has been a fast-evolving weapon for the Navy – as it has expanded its mission envelope to include air-defense, ballistic missile defense and even offensive use as an anti-ship surface attack weapon.In addition, utilizing its active seeker, the SM-6 is a key part of Naval Integrated Fire Control – Counter Air, or NIFC-CA; NIFC-CA uses fire-control technology to link Aegis radar with an airborne relay sensor to detect and destroy approaching enemy threats from beyond the horizon.With an active, dual-mode seeker able to send an electromagnetic “ping” forward from the missile itself, the SM-6 is able to better adjust to moving targets, according to Raytheon developers.Giving commanders more decision-making time to effectively utilize layered ship defenses when under attack is an integral part of the rationale for NIFC-CA.The ship also fires Vertical Launch Anti-Submarine Rockets, or ASROCs. ASROCs are 16-feet long with a 14-inch diameter; a rocket delivers the torpedo at very high speeds to a specific point in the water at which point it turns on its sensors and searches for an enemy submarine. Wade Knudson, DDG 1000 program manager, Raytheon, has told Warrior in recent years through the course of several interviews.The ship is also built with Mk 57 a vertical launch tubes which are engineered into the hull near the perimeter of the ship.Called Peripheral Vertical Launch System, the tubes are integrated with the hull around the ship’s periphery in order to ensure that weapons can keep firing in the event of damage. Instead of having all of the launch tubes in succession or near one another, the DDG 1000 has spread them out in order to mitigate risk in the event of attack, developers said.In total, there are 80 launch tubes built into the hull of the DDG 1000; the Peripheral Vertical Launch System involves a collaborative effort between Raytheon and BAE Systems.Also, the launchers are especially designed with software such that it can accommodate a wide range of weapons; the launchers can house one SM-2, SM-3 or SM-6, ASROCs and up to four ESSMs ...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    • Fabre-trained horse triumphs over Raffle Prize at Deauville• ‘He will go further, he will be a Guineas horse for sure’André Fabre has a live contender for the 2,000 Guineas, following a game success in the Prix Morny by Earthlight. It was a victory to cheer all of French racing, as it ends a run of summer Sundays when the biggest races had consistently been won by British or Irish raiders.The Morny had become a weak race for the home defence, with one French-trained winner in the previous 14 years, and Fabre has not had this trophy on his mantelpiece since the days of Zafonic, back in 1992. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    But Larry Kudlow also played down fears of a recession in 2007, just months before the worst financial crash since the Great Depression
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Episodes like the death of a boy who was shoved in front of a train have fueled public anxiety, and far-right campaigning, in Germany.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The state of emergency will run for three months in Sila and Ouaddai regions where 50 people have died since August 9.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Open Arms says conditions for 107 migrants on board too dire to make 6-day journey to the Spanish port.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    An Ohio man who authorities said is a self-described white nationalist is in custody on charges that he threatened to attack a local Jewish community center.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Explosives could be used to open up route to pair trapped in cavern in Tatra mountains More than two dozen rescue workers are battling to save two cavers trapped in a cavern in the Tatra mountains in Poland after a narrow tunnel flooded with water.A representative of the rescue service said on Sunday it had not yet been possible to establish contact with the two cavers and that concern was growing because of their long exposure to extreme conditions. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Explosives could be used to open up route to pair trapped in cavern in Tatra mountains More than two dozen rescue workers are battling to save two cavers trapped in a cavern in the Tatra mountains in Poland after a narrow tunnel flooded with water.A representative of the rescue service said on Sunday it had not yet been possible to establish contact with the two cavers and that concern was growing because of their long exposure to extreme conditions. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Spanish legend Xavi Hernandez won his first coaching trophy as Al Sadd beat Al Duhail 1-0 to lift Sheikh Jassim Cup at the Jassim Bin Hamad Stadium on Saturday...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Neil and Katya Jones were the focus of a media storm after she and Strictly partner Seann Walsh kissed.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Lindsey Graham on Dems' threat to restructure Supreme Court  Fox News'Over my dead body': Lindsey Graham rebukes idea to transform Supreme Court and Electoral College  Washington ExaminerView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Qatar has long challenged American security interests, sustaining Hamas and other terrorist groups.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Kudlow confirms Trump wants to buy Greenland  New York Post 'We're looking at it,' Trump says of potential Greenland purchase  USA TODAYKudlow says he doesn't see a recession on the horizon, defends Trump's trade war  CNBCTrump says he's still interested buying Greenland. Denmark says it's not for sale.  NBC NewsTrump downplays talk of a recession after his economic advisers say growing fears are unfounded  CNNView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Organisers claim more than one million people attend pro-democracy demonstration
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    This is the 11th week of protests, which are reaching what demonstrators believe to be a tipping point amid an intensifying crackdown.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Sheffield United's first Premier League home game for 12 years ends in victory after John Lundstram's goal sees off lacklustre Crystal Palace.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Islam Times - The US stock markets experienced surprise fall after concerns about a new recession were grown, with Dow dropping 800 points or over 2 percent.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    'We have been warning for days, desperation has its limits,' says founder of rescue group after being caught in standoff with Rome
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Hundreds of thousands stage a pro-democracy protest amid warnings from Beijing authorities.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Hundreds of thousands stage a pro-democracy protest amid warnings from Beijing authorities.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Islam Times - Amid tensions in the Persian Gulf between Iran and Washington and the Washington's attempts to build an anti-Tehran coalition on the international stage, after a visit to Russia of Iran’s Navy commander Rear Admiral Hussein Khanzadi, Tehran and Moscow announced a military pact without referring to the details, unleashing media speculations about its goals and aspects.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The protesters' demands include the complete retraction of a controversial extradition bill.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Boris Johnson will visit European capitals this week on his first overseas trip as British leader, as his government said Sunday it had ordered the repeal of the decades-old law enforcing EU membership. Johnson's Downing Street office confirmed he will travel to Berlin on Wednesday for talks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and on to Paris Thursday for discussions with French President Emmanuel Macron, amid growing fears of a no-deal Brexit in two-and-a- half months.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Great Britain's Dina Asher-Smith says "it's so weird" seeing a cardboard cut-out of her head in the crowd at the Birmingham Grand Prix.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    'His murderers cut his right left off...his right arm and his tongue,' rights group says
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    'We are in a state of humanitarian emergency,' Open Arms's Laura Lanuza tells France 24
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A charity that operates a rescue ship carrying more than a hundred migrants off the coast of Italy on Sunday said that it could not accept an offer from Spain to dock in Algeciras, citing an emergency situation on board.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Three-quarters of Germans say that a US troop pullout won’t leave them defenseless, but almost as many believe their own army would be of little effect, a poll found, amid reports that Washington may move its assets to Poland. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    If the Trump era means an outed celebration and recommendation of colonial atrocity, what we need is anti-colonialism.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Operation Yellowhammer shows that a disorderly Brexit must be avoided at all costs. Now is not the time for posturingThe term “Project Fear” must be expunged from the respectable political lexicon. Now that we know the full detail of the government’s Operation Yellowhammer assumptions about a no-deal Brexit, these two words – scornfully applied for three years to all warnings about Brexit – have no meaningful place in the present political emergency.“There’s a lot of scaremongering around,” declared the energy minister, Kwasi Kwarteng, on Sky’s Sophy Ridge on Sunday show, in dismissive response to the Sunday Times’ reports on the leaked Yellowhammer document. Really? These, after all, are the government’s own assessments, not the panicked assertions of ultra-remainers. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Islam Times - Imagine the response if protesters were to smash up JFK or Heathrow airports, closing down international flight services. The US and British authorities would have culprits rounded up and jailed, or worse, shot dead on the spot by armed police.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Woman escaped unscathed despite being inside the vehicle, say police
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Criminal gangs are targeting children and recruiting them as drug mules.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Far-right activists and anti-fascist counter-protesters clash in liberal city
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    On the occasion of the country's 100th Independence Day.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Supporters of Beijing and Hong Kong have held rallies in the UK, France, US, Canada and Australia.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Authorities in Gibraltar on Sunday rejected the United States' latest request not to release a seized Iranian supertanker, clearing the way for the vessel to set sail after being detained last month for allegedly attempting to breach European Union sanctions on Syria. The ship was expected to leave Sunday night, according to a statement on Twitter by Hamid Baeidinejad, Iran's ambassador to Britain. The tanker's release comes amid a growing confrontation between Iran and the West after President Donald Trump pulled Washington out of Tehran's nuclear deal with world powers over a year ago.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Football is an attractive realm for politicians to wander around due to the prestige associated with elite-level athletic achievement, so it's not unusual to see stars rubbing shoulders with global leaders from time to time...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Welsh town's anti-sex toilets will spray users with water  Fox NewsThe Welsh town is set to install hi-tech toilets that would deter sexual activity by sounding an alarm and spraying the user with a cool blast of water.View full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Zimbabwe police have banned an anti-government demonstration planned for Monday by the country's main opposition party in the city of Bulawayo, saying it would likely result in "public disorder".
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Tel Aviv shop is run by the daughter of celebrity rabbi Shmuley Boteach. “We are reclaiming sex and helping to create passion and intimacy between two people,” said Chana Boteach, 29.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Tel Aviv shop is run by the daughter of celebrity rabbi Shmuley Boteach.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    World’s first ‘kosher sex store’ seeks to give intimacy a spiritual revolution  The Washington PostTEL AVIV — At first glance, the stylish boutique on Tel Aviv's Montefiore Street looks like any other fancy store in this swanky part of the city. Hip denim hangs ...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Protecting Singapore against rising sea levels could cost S$100 billion ($72 billion) or more over 100 years, its prime minister said on Sunday, as the low-lying island-state makes preparations to mitigate the impact of global warming.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    North Korea also has a large but nearly completely obsolete air force. The only aircraft Pyongyang possesses that might marginally threaten American airpower are its small fleet of Mikoyan MiG-29 Fulcrums. “They supposedly have up to 40 MiG-29s, but I’m not sure how many of them are still airworthy but some surely are,” Kashin said. “Pilot training is limited and never exceeds 20 flight hours per year.”If the Trump Administration chooses to intervene in North Korea, the White House may discover that Pyongyang is a more formidable adversary than many might expect.Aside from the reclusive regime’s nuclear weapons, Kim Jong-un’s hermit kingdom boasts air defenses that are more advanced than many might realize. Moreover, Pyongyang has also taken steps to increase its resilience against any aerial onslaught that that United States might launch in the event of war. The so-called Democratic People’s Republic of Korea has not forgotten the lessons of the Korean War–which technically has not yet ended.(This first appeared last year.)“Between 1950 and 1953, the U.S. Air Force and Navy flattened North Korea, so the NORKS have had 65 years to think about how to make sure that does not happen again and dig lots of bomb proof shelters and tunnels,” retired Rear Adm. Mike McDevitt, a senior fellow at the Center for Naval Analyses, told The National Interest.But aside from hardening its facilities, Pyongyang fields more advanced air defenses than one might assume. While the overwhelming majority of North Korean air defenses are older Soviet systems, Pyongyang does field some surprisingly capable indigenous weapons.“They have a mix of old Soviet SAMs [surface-to-air missiles], including the S-75, S-125, S-200 and Kvadrat, which are likely in more or less good condition,” Vasily Kashin, a senior fellow at the Center for Comprehensive European and International Studies at Moscow’s Higher School of Economics told The National Interest. “They used to produce the S-75 themselves—and those could have received some significant upgrades. In addition to them, since early the 2010s they are fielding an indigenous modern SAM system which is called KN-06 by South Korea and the U.S.”It is not clear how many KN-06 SAM batteries Pyongyang has built, but the North Korean weapon is a surprisingly capable system that is similar to early model versions of the Russian-built S-300. “No one knows exactly how many such systems exist,” Kashin said. “The KN-06 has phased array radar and tracks via missile guidance system and maybe equivalent to the early S-300P versions but with greater range.”Kashin—who is a specialist on Asian matters—said that South Koreans sources have written that the KN-06 has been successfully tested. The weapon is thought to have a range of up to 150 km. One of the reasons that the KN-06 is often ignored—even though information is available about the North Korean weapon—is that Western analysts often underestimate Pyongyang’s industrial capabilities.“Generally, there is a great underestimation of North Korean industrial capabilities in the world,” Kashin said. “From what I know, they do produce some computerized machine tools and industrial robotics, fiber-optics, some semiconductors as well as a variety of trucks and cars, railroad rolling stock, consumer electronics etc. So they can do something comparable to Soviet designs of the 1970s to early 80s—especially when they cooperate with the Iranians.”North Korean low altitude air defenses are also fairly robust—even if the systems that Pyongyang fields are dated. “At low altitudes, they have huge numbers of license produced and indigenous MANPADs [man-portable air defenses] and 23-57mm anti-aircraft artillery—many thousands of pieces,” Kashin said.North Korea also has a large but nearly completely obsolete air force. The only aircraft Pyongyang possesses that might marginally threaten American airpower are its small fleet of Mikoyan MiG-29 Fulcrums. “They supposedly have up to 40 MiG-29s, but I’m not sure how many of them are still airworthy but some surely are,” Kashin said. “Pilot training is limited and never exceeds 20 flight hours per year.”However, while North Korean technology is relatively primitive—the nation’s air defenses are coordinated. “They do have an old Soviet computerized anti-aircraft command and control system. Most of the radars are old, but they did receive some newer Iranian phased array radars,” Kashin said. “This is what I know, the anti-aircraft units are extensively using underground shelters for cover—not easy to destroy.”Thus, while generally primitive, North Korean defenses might be a tougher nut to crack than many might expect. Moreover, while their technology is old, North Korea’s philosophy of self-reliance means it can produce most of its own military hardware. “They produce a lot of stuff, although in many cases the technology would lag some 20 to 40 years behind,” Kashin said. “But they do produce it independently.”Dave Majumdar is the former defense editor for The National Interest.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    More than 60 killed and 180 injured in explosion in western part of Afghan capitalIslamic State has claimed responsibility for a bombing at a wedding hall in Kabul that killed at least 63 people and injured more than 200. Survivors said the bomber was standing by a stage where children and adults were dancing and clapping when he detonated his explosives vest.The bomb went off inside the the Dubai City wedding hall, in a western neighbourhood of Afghanistan’s capital that is home to many in the minority Shia Hazara community. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The triplets were born within four minutes.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    South Carolina Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham says expanding the court is code for liberals packing the court.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    He will then fly to Bahrain.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    'Cool Hand' Luke Keeler says an angry Conor McGregor phoned him after he made comments on social media criticizing the Irish UFC star's actions following the recent footage showing him appearing to punch a man in a Dublin pub. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A Russian T-72B3 main battle tank reached a speed of 84 kph (52.1 mph) during a tank biathlon event outside the capital. It’s an all-time record for the competition – and an impressive feat for a 64-ton armored behemoth. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A Russian T-72B3 main battle tank reached a speed of 84 kph (52.1 mph) during a tank biathlon event outside the capital. It’s an all-time record for the competition – and an impressive feat for a 64-ton armored behemoth. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    There are only 12 examples of the shoe ever made.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Sunday that she would meet British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Wednesday evening to discuss Britain's planned departure from the European Union, adding that Berlin was also prepared for a disorderly Brexit.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Guidance unit for ‘high explosive bomb’ found at site in Yemen capitalA United Nations panel of experts has uncovered fragments of British-made laser guidance missile systems at an air raid site in Yemen in a strike that it concluded breached international humanitarian law.The attacks took place in September 2016, a month after the then foreign secretary Boris Johnson said he was content to allow the export of weapons systems to Saudi Arabia in the expectation they would be used in Yemen. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Guidance unit for ‘high explosive bomb’ found at site in Yemen capitalA United Nations panel of experts has uncovered fragments of British-made laser guidance missile systems at an air raid site in Yemen in a strike that it concluded breached international humanitarian law.The attacks took place in September 2016, a month after the then foreign secretary Boris Johnson said he was content to allow the export of weapons systems to Saudi Arabia in the expectation they would be used in Yemen. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Modified pig hearts could be used for human transplants within just three years, according to the pioneering surgeon who performed the first transplantation in the UK 40 years ago. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Troops have reportedly used teargas, chilli grenades and pellets to disperse crowds during weekend of clashesIndian officials have ordered government employees in Kashmir to return to duty and some schools will reopen on Monday after a tense weekend of protests in the territory.At least two dozen people were reportedly admitted to hospitals with pellet injuries after violent clashes on Saturday night, almost two weeks on from the Indian government’s abrupt decision to revoke Kashmir’s special status. Indian troops also used teargas, chilli grenades and pellets to disperse protesters. A 65-year-old man died after being admitted to the hospital with breathing difficulties, according to reports. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Tehran is in talks with Moscow over plans to establish a ferry service across the Caspian Sea that would link Iran with Russia’s Dagestan. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    India orders Kashmir government staff back to work amid protests  The GuardianKashmir: India begins to reduce restrictions  Al Jazeera EnglishKashmir move spells trouble for other Indian states  BBC NewsModi has stoked Kashmir’s anger and stained all India’s democracy  The Washington Post‘News From Here Doesn’t Go Out’: Kashmir Simmers Under Lockdown  The AtlanticView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Leaked Brexit Document Predicts 'Catastrophic Collapse' Of UK Infrastructure  NPRAnalysis: No-deal Brexit consequences 'drug and food shortages, protests'  Al Jazeera EnglishBrexit: PM to tell EU leaders to renegotiate deal  BBC NewsMPs won’t be forgiven if they fail to stop Boris Johnson’s Brexit ploy  The GuardianPipsqueak Speaker's an arrogant menace, says NICK FERRARI  Express.co.ukView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Iran’s ambassador says vessel is expected to leave after Gibraltar rejects US request to detain it furtherThe supertanker at the centre of a six-week diplomatic row between Britain and Iran is expected to leave Gibraltar on Sunday night, Iran’s ambassador to the UK has said. Hamid Baeidinejad said on Twitter: “With the arrival of two specialised engineering teams to Gibraltar … the vessel is expected to leave tonight.” Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Iran’s ambassador says vessel is expected to leave after Gibraltar rejects US request to detain it furtherThe supertanker at the centre of a six-week diplomatic row between Britain and Iran is expected to leave Gibraltar on Sunday night, Iran’s ambassador to the UK has said. Hamid Baeidinejad said on Twitter: “With the arrival of two specialised engineering teams to Gibraltar … the vessel is expected to leave tonight.” Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Hundreds of thousands of Hong Kong people flocked to a downtown park for a rally after two months of increasingly violent clashes that have prompted severe warnings from Beijing and failed to win concessions from the city’s government. Torrential rain came down an hour into the rally, turning the park into a sea of colourful umbrellas. Many began walking on the streets, despite the police ban on a march, as the park became overcrowdedHong Kong: hundreds of thousands join protest in pouring rain Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Thousands of people have been detained in Indian Kashmir over fears of outbreaks of unrest after New Delhi stripped the restive region of its autonomy two weeks ago, government sources told AFP.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The complainant posted an 'indecent' photo on Facebook with the defendant did not like.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A dangerous new phase in Italy’s populist drama is beginning, with the nationalist League set on devouring its coalition partnerWe are witnessing the beginning of act two in the drama of Italian populism, and it is a showdown between the protagonists who made phase one happen. Since the election of 2018, Matteo Salvini’s League has grown stronger, and it has had enough of its coalition partner, the Five Star Movement. It now feels it can claim sole leadership of the country, with Salvini as prime minister.It’s a development that Steve Bannon, the theoretician of the US populist wave that elected Trump in 2016, foresaw. The day after the coalition was formed, Bannon said of Salvini and the Five Star leader, Luigi Di Maio: “They will govern together, but Salvini is the real leader, because Di Maio resembles [Emmanuel] Macron.” This was always a tactical alliance, because in the end populism is based on there being only one leader. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein was allowed to buy small women’s underwear while serving a jail sentence for soliciting a minor for prostitution, official records have revealed.Mr Epstein, a wealthy financier with links to the higher ranks of US society, hung himself in his cell in Manhattan after he was arrested last month and pleaded not guilty to federal charges of sex trafficking involving dozens of underage girls as young as 14.Before his arrest on 6 July 2018, Mr Epstein served another 13 months in custody in Florida in 2008-2009 after a state court found him guilty of soliciting a minor for prostitution.But during that jail term, he was allowed to purchase female underwear that would not fit an average adult woman, the Miami Herald revealed after examining records obtained from the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office.During his time in custody in Florida between 30 June 2008 and 22 July 2009, Mr Epstein benefited from a generous work-release programme that allowed him to walk out of prison for up to 16 hours per day for six or seven days a week. Some records even began to refer to him as a “client” rather than an inmate.Mr Epstein’s death has caused outrage and prompted an investigation into the circumstances that allowed him to escape justice and apparently take his own life.Attorney general William Barr said there were “serious irregularities” within the Metropolitan Correctional Centre in New York City, where Epstein was awaiting trial.Reports have indicated that standard protocol was not met in the jail.An autopsy concluded that the cause of his death was suicide.Two guards have been put on administrative leave after it was determined that they had fallen asleep and had falsified records in a log to indicate they had been checking on the disgraced financier every 30 minutes, as was required.Falsified entries such as those could constitute a federal crime.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The security crackdown came into effect following an August 5 decision by India to downgrade the region's autonomy.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell below the 2-year rate Wednesday, which typically taken as a sign a recession is on the horizon.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Kill List and High-Rise director’s drama for Channel 4 will skewer tensions between age groupsAfter setting films in a High-Rise and A Field in England, the director Ben Wheatley is turning his attention to a provincial British town for a new six-part zombie drama satirising intergenerational divides in the UK.Channel 4’s Generation Z will be written and directed by Wheatley, with the Free Fire director skewering tensions between age groups in a dark satire that will feature flesh-eating pensioners and mirror the restive atmosphere of Brexit Britain, according to its producer, George Faber. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Demonstrations triggered by reports of two alleged rapes of teenage girls by police
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Moisturising and massaging can speed up the healing process, but if you still find your scars distressing, a variety of treatments are available, advises a consultant dermatologistScars are one of the body’s ways of repairing itself. If skin is damaged, your body works to form fibrous structures to mend the wound. Unfortunately, the resulting scar will look and feel different from the surrounding skin. There are different causes of scarring, but surgery or acne are particularly common. When a scar appears, it often looks angry and red, but will usually fade over several months. There are things you can do to help.One way to reduce scarring is to moisturise and massage developing scars for five to 10 minutes every day. This helps to stimulate blood flow, which is good for scar remodelling. Some people use specialist skincare oils, but the massaging is more important than the product used. If you have a scar that is healing, it is important to refrain from exercising or moving around, as the tissue may begin to move apart and the scar will take on a larger, rugby-ball shape during remodelling. If you smoke, stop: as well as all its other health risks, smoking has a negative effect on healing and the scar will end up looking much worse. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The MacBook Pro recall and its subsequent ban from flights underscores the increasing brand risk from problems with lithium-ion batteries.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Matt Healy, the frontman of British band The 1975, has defied Dubai's anti-LGBT laws by kissing a man during their first gig in the strict country...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Israeli troops killed three Palestinians and severely wounded a fourth near Gaza Strip's heavily guarded perimeter fence, the Gaza Health Ministry said Sunday. The Israeli military said a helicopter and a tank fired at armed suspects near the fence overnight. After weeks of calm, Palestinian militants have attempted a number of raids in recent days.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    On 19 August 1989, Hungarians and Austrians gathered in friendship at the border, paving the way to unificationWhen the end finally came for the iron curtain, it was not bulldozers or hammers that struck one of the first decisive blows, but a picnic.Thirty years ago this Monday, on 19 August 1989, thousands of Hungarians and Austrians gathered at the border fence between the two countries, which also marked the dividing line between the Communist bloc and the west. They had come for a “pan-European picnic” of solidarity and friendship across the iron curtain, as momentum for political change increased and the eastern bloc regimes struggled to keep up with rising popular discontent. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    She was then given a sobriety test by police
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Woman proves age is just a number after losing 125 pounds, climbing Mt. Fuji  WYFF GreenvilleMarilyn says she was inspired by her brother, Ron, who she lost to cancer.View full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Chancellor had suggested he could look at various options, saying he was ‘a low-tax guy’Sajid Javid has quashed speculation that he could shift stamp duty on to sellers rather than buyers, just two days after suggesting he could look at the idea.The chancellor had appeared to float the idea in an interview with the Times, as he prepares for his first spending review. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    In August 1619, a British ship landed on the shores of Virginia with some 20 African captives aboard. Four hundred years later, the date is being commemorated as the beginning of the age of slavery in North America.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A Level 3 course of the National Coaching Program, organized by Bahrain Olympic Committee’s (BOC)'s Bahrain Olympic Academy, got underway attended by 25 coaches from Bahrain and Saudi Arabia...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    What’s it like to make uplifting calls that change lives? Ammar Kalia spoke to the people whose job is to spread joyFor 12 years now, Anita Pires has been working at the call centre for Camelot, the company that runs the UK’s national lottery. She is one of a staff of 30 who answer calls from potential lottery winners, checking their numbers for prizes that range from £5 to the multi-millions. “In 2009, I had one of my biggest winners, who won £45m,” she says. “Even I couldn’t believe it. We only get an automated prompt just before they’re put through; it’s always very exciting. The claimants are in shock and don’t really comprehend that it’s millions in cash. There’s a real buzz in the office, with everyone anticipating who might get the call from a big winner that week.”According to a 2016 report, more than 700,000 people in the UK are employed by call centres The work is often tough: it can be a difficult mix of monotony, stress and the emotional labour of staying friendly for hour upon hour of calls. But for a few call-centre employees such as Pires, the work is pure joy. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A man accused of operating a large drug-dealing ring on a popular messaging app appeared in an Israeli court Sunday after his extradition from Ukraine, where he had previously sought to escape. Amos Dov Silver, an Israeli-American, was taken to court in Rishon Lezion near Tel Aviv after his arrival from Ukraine, police said. Authorities in Ukraine said Saturday they had captured Silver a day after he escaped from the airport while he was being extradited.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    More than a fifth of Border Force staff have experienced discrimination on dutyHome Office agencies embroiled in the Windrush scandal have reported rising levels of discrimination in the workplace, an official survey has revealed.Employees at the Border Force and Immigration Enforcement, which played a key role in the wrongful detention and prosecution of people who rightfully came to the UK from the Caribbean, told an internal survey they face increasing levels of discrimination from colleagues. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    British officials are struggling to stay on message after the publication of a leaked report warning of food and fuel shortages in the event of a hard Brexit, contradicting one another in their attempts at damage control. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    British officials are struggling to stay on message after the publication of a leaked report warning of food and fuel shortages in the event of a hard Brexit, contradicting one another in their attempts at damage control. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    He was found guilty of murdering his wife and then trying to end his life by stabbing himself several times.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Commentary: Endangered Species Act reforms improve Incentives for landowners to recover species  Salt Lake TribuneWaPo calls Trump admin 'another threat' to endangered species | TheHill  The HillWorld’s nations gather to tackle wildlife extinction crisis  The GuardianIn trying to gut Endangered Species Act, Trump administration puts profits ahead of people  CNNThe Species Act, Endangered: ‘Like a Plan From a Cartoon Villain’  The New York TimesView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Open Arms rescue ship carrying more than 100 migrants on Sunday rejected an offer from Spain to dock in Algeciras, a six days' journey away, citing an "extreme" emergency on board.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Open Arms rescue ship carrying more than 100 migrants on Sunday rejected an offer from Spain to dock in Algeciras, a six days' journey away, citing an "extreme" emergency on board.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Billionaire purchased garments that would not fit average adult women
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    President complains focus on his racism is 'witch hunt'
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The death toll from a late-night suicide bombing at a crowded wedding party in the Afghan capital rose to at least 63 on Sunday, including women and children, officials said.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Trials of digital alert technology had ‘major impact’ on deadly form of blood poisoning Trials of new digital alert technology to monitor hospital patients with sepsis have saved hundreds of lives, the NHS has said.Plans to roll out the “action and alert” technology across England as part of the NHS Long Term Plan are under way after trials at three hospitals. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Choose your food carefully, don’t eat at your desk – and try for a quick burst of exerciseIt is cheaper and you know what is in it. Healthy leftovers from the night before, bulked up with extra vegetables or a salad, can be a good option, says Gillian Killiner, a dietitian and spokeswoman for the British Dietetic Association. Shop-bought convenience food “should be the last resort”, she says. “It can be laden with pro-inflammatory ingredients, especially cheap vegetable oils and fillers, which do not provide long-acting energy, so leave you hungry and unsatisfied.” Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The United Nations mission in Libya (UNSMIL) has dismissed claims by strongman Khalifa Haftar that a government-controlled airport bombed by his forces in recent days housed military infrastructure. On Thursday and Friday Haftar's self-styled Libyan National Army (LNA) launched air strikes on Zuwara airport in western Libya, targeting what it said was a hangar "which houses Turkish drones and their ammunition". UNSMIL said it dispatched a delegation to Zuwara to investigate the LNA allegations.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The United Nations mission in Libya (UNSMIL) has dismissed claims by strongman Khalifa Haftar that a government-controlled airport bombed by his forces in recent days housed military infrastructure. On Thursday and Friday Haftar's self-styled Libyan National Army (LNA) launched air strikes on Zuwara airport in western Libya, targeting what it said was a hangar "which houses Turkish drones and their ammunition". UNSMIL said it dispatched a delegation to Zuwara to investigate the LNA allegations.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Americans now say they approve of free trade by 64%-27%, a margin of better than two to one.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Pakistan currently has a nuclear “triad” of nuclear delivery systems based on land, in the air and at sea. Islamabad is believed to have modified American-built F-16A fighters and possibly French-made Mirage fighters to deliver nuclear bombs by 1995. Since the fighters would have to penetrate India’s air defense network to deliver their payloads against cities and other targets, Pakistani aircraft would likely be deliver tactical nuclear weapons against battlefield targets.Sandwiched between Iran, China, India and Afghanistan, Pakistan lives in a complicated neighborhood with a variety of security issues. One of the nine known states known to have nuclear weapons, Pakistan’s nuclear arsenal and doctrine are continually evolving to match perceived threats. A nuclear power for decades, Pakistan is now attempting to construct a nuclear triad of its own, making its nuclear arsenal resilient and capable of devastating retaliatory strikes.(This first appeared several years ago.)Pakistan’s nuclear program goes back to the 1950s, during the early days of its rivalry with India. President Zulfikar Ali Bhutto famously said in 1965, “If India builds the bomb, we will eat grass or leaves, even go hungry, but we will get one of our own.”Recommended: Air War: Stealth F-22 Raptor vs. F-14 Tomcat (That Iran Still Flies)Recommended: A New Report Reveals Why There Won't Be Any 'New' F-22 RaptorsRecommended: How an ‘Old’ F-15 Might Kill Russia’s New Stealth FighterThe program became a higher priority after the country’s 1971 defeat at the hands of India, which caused East Pakistan to break away and become Bangladesh. Experts believe the humiliating loss of territory, much more than reports that India was pursuing nuclear weapons, accelerated the Pakistani nuclear program. India tested its first bomb, codenamed “Smiling Buddha,” in May 1974, putting the subcontinent on the road to nuclearization.Pakistan began the process of accumulating the necessary fuel for nuclear weapons, enriched uranium and plutonium. The country was particularly helped by one A. Q. Khan, a metallurgist working in the West who returned to his home country in 1975 with centrifuge designs and business contacts necessary to begin the enrichment process. Pakistan’s program was assisted by European countries and a clandestine equipment-acquisition program designed to do an end run on nonproliferation efforts. Outside countries eventually dropped out as the true purpose of the program became clear, but the clandestine effort continued.Exactly when Pakistan had completed its first nuclear device is murky. Former president Benazir Bhutto, Zulfikar Bhutto’s daughter, claimed that her father told her the first device was ready by 1977. A member of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission said design of the bomb was completed in 1978 and the bomb was “cold tested”—stopping short of an actual explosion—in 1983.Benazir Bhutto later claimed that Pakistan’s bombs were stored disassembled until 1998, when India tested six bombs in a span of three days. Nearly three weeks later, Pakistan conducted a similar rapid-fire testing schedule, setting off five bombs in a single day and a sixth bomb three days later. The first device, estimated at twenty-five to thirty kilotons, may have been a boosted uranium device. The second was estimated at twelve kilotons, and the next three as sub-kiloton devices.The sixth and final device appears to have also been a twelve-kiloton bomb that was detonated at a different testing range; a U.S. Air Force “Constant Phoenix” nuclear-detection aircraft reportedly detected plutonium afterward. Since Pakistan had been working on a uranium bomb and North Korea—which shared or purchased research with Pakistan through the A. Q. Khan network—had been working on a uranium bomb, some outside observers concluded the sixth test was actually a North Korean test, detonated elsewhere to conceal North Korea’s involvement although. There is no consensus on this conclusion.Experts believe Pakistan’s nuclear stockpile is steadily growing. In 1998, the stockpile was estimated at five to twenty-five devices, depending on how much enriched uranium each bomb required. Today Pakistan is estimated to have an arsenal of 110 to 130 nuclear bombs. In 2015 the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Stimson Center estimated Pakistan’s bomb-making capability at twenty devices annually, which on top of the existing stockpile meant Pakistan could quickly become the third-largest nuclear power in the world. Other observers, however, believe Pakistan can only develop another forty to fifty warheads in the near future.Pakistani nuclear weapons are under control of the military’s Strategic Plans Division, and are primarily stored in Punjab Province, far from the northwest frontier and the Taliban. Ten thousand Pakistani troops and intelligence personnel from the SPD guard the weapons. Pakistan claims that the weapons are only armed by the appropriate code at the last moment, preventing a “rogue nuke” scenario.Pakistani nuclear doctrine appears to be to deter what it considers an economically, politically and militarily stronger India. The nuclear standoff is exacerbated by the traditional animosity between the two countries, the several wars the two countries have fought, and events such as the 2008 terrorist attack on Mumbai, which were directed by Pakistan. Unlike neighboring India and China, Pakistan does not have a “no first use” doctrine, and reserves the right to use nuclear weapons, particularly low-yield tactical nuclear weapons, to offset India’s advantage in conventional forces.Pakistan currently has a nuclear “triad” of nuclear delivery systems based on land, in the air and at sea. Islamabad is believed to have modified American-built F-16A fighters and possibly French-made Mirage fighters to deliver nuclear bombs by 1995. Since the fighters would have to penetrate India’s air defense network to deliver their payloads against cities and other targets, Pakistani aircraft would likely be deliver tactical nuclear weapons against battlefield targets.Land-based delivery systems are in the form of missiles, with many designs based on or influenced by Chinese and North Korean designs. The Hatf series of mobile missiles includes the solid-fueled Hatf-III (180 miles), solid-fueled Hatf-IV (466 miles) and liquid-fueled Hatf V, (766 miles). The CSIS Missile Threat Initiative believes that as of 2014, Hatf VI (1242 miles) is likely in service. Pakistan is also developing a Shaheen III intermediate-range missile capable of striking targets out to 1708 miles, in order to strike the Nicobar and Andaman Islands.The sea component of Pakistan’s nuclear force consists of ...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    O2 Arena, LondonGrande’s vocals are given the spotlight in a show that’s refreshingly understated ... for a gig involving a neon limousine, cascading bank notes and a re-creation of The Last SupperAriana Grande first appears at the centre of a tableau of dancers based on Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper – albeit a last supper at which the diners suddenly start climbing on the table, waving their thong-clad bums in the air and pretending to cop off with each other. It’s both a striking opening and an anomaly, a rare moment of visual spectacle in a show that feels remarkably understated and restrained. Of course, such things are relative: it’s as subtle as any gig that involves a neon-pink limousine rising up through the stage while fake bank notes rain down on fans who’ve shelled out real cash – the best part of £250 – to stand in the front rows can be. But, by arena-sized pop standards, the Sweetener tour is pretty much the last word in discretion. No relentless son-et-lumière bombardment, no eye-popping special effects, just a couple of giant globes on to which tasteful footage of the sun and night sky is projected. Even the stage-side screens are of a reasonable size.Attention is focused on Grande herself, which is quite a gamble. As pop stars go, she’s not a particularly charismatic figure. It’s something she’s been smart enough to paper over with a series of easily identifiable and copyable looks, an old trick that has been largely forgotten in pop’s latterday stampede towards girl/boy-next-door “relatability”. Tonight, though the rabbit ears that were once her trademark are long gone, the high ponytail is more immense than ever and her fans scream every time she flicks it with her fingers. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The moment a meteorite blasted through the Earth’s atmosphere and created an enormous fireball that lit up the skies over the Italian island of Sardinia has been captured in awe-inspiring dashcam footage. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Author: AFPID: 1566132348319135900Sun, 2019-08-18 12:24 LONDON: UK's Boris Johnson will visit European capitals this week on his first overseas trip as prime minister, as his government said Sunday it had ordered the scrapping of the decades-old law enforcing its EU membership. Johnson will travel to Berlin on Wednesday for talks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and on to Paris Thursday for discussions with French President Emmanuel Macron, Downing Street confirmed on Sunday, amid growing fears of a no-deal Brexit in two and a half months. The meetings, ahead of a two-day G7 summit starting Saturday in the southern French resort of Biarritz, are his first diplomatic forays abroad since replacing predecessor Theresa May last month. Johnson is expected to push for the EU to reopen negotiations over the terms of Brexit or warn that it faces the prospect of Britain's disorderly departure on October 31 -- the date it is due to leave. European leaders have repeatedly rejected reopening an accord agreed by May last year but then rejected by British lawmakers on three occasions, despite Johnson's threats that the country will leave then without an agreement. In an apparent show of intent, London announced Sunday that it had ordered the repeal of the European Communities Act, which took Britain into the forerunner to the EU 46 years ago and gives Brussels law supremacy. The order, signed by Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay on Friday, is set to take effect on October 31. "This is a landmark moment in taking back control of our laws from Brussels," Barclay said in a statement. "This is a clear signal to the people of this country that there is no turning back -- we are leaving the EU as promised on October 31, whatever the circumstances -- delivering on the instructions given to us in 2016." The moves come as Johnson faces increasing pressure to immediately recall MPs from their summer holidays so that parliament can debate Brexit. More than 100 lawmakers, who are not due to return until September 3, have demanded in a letter that he reconvene the 650-seat House of Commons and let them sit permanently until October 31. "Our country is on the brink of an economic crisis, as we career towards a no-deal Brexit," said the letter, signed by MPs and opposition party leaders who want to halt a no-deal departure. "We face a national emergency, and parliament must be recalled now." Parliament is set to break up again shortly after it returns, with the main parties holding their annual conferences during the September break. Main opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn wants to call a vote of no confidence in Johnson's government after parliament returns. He hopes to take over as a temporary prime minister, seek an extension to Britain's EU departure date to stop a no-deal Brexit, and then call a general election. "What we need is a government that is prepared to negotiate with the European Union so we don't have a crash-out on the 31st," Corbyn said Saturday. "This government clearly doesn't want to do that." Britain could face food, fuel and medicine shortages and chaos at its ports in a no-deal Brexit, The Sunday Times newspaper reported, citing a leaked government planning document. There would likely be some form of hard border imposed on the island of Ireland, the document implied. Rather than worst-case scenarios, the leaked document, compiled this month by the Cabinet Office ministry, spells out the likely ramifications of a no-deal Brexit, the broadsheet claimed. The document said logjams could affect fuel distribution, while up to 85 percent of trucks using the main ports to continental Europe might not be ready for French customs. The availability of fresh food would be diminished and prices would go up, the newspaper said. Main category: WorldTags: Boris JohnsonUKEUBrexitEuropeUK Prime Minister Boris Johnson Pelosi vows to thwart US-UK trade deal if Brexit risks Irish peace’Collaborators’ are undermining Britain’s Brexit bet, PM says
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Thousands are struggling to survive as the two neighbouring countries' dispute worsens over the removal of Indian-administered Kashmir's autonomy.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Batch of suppositories pulled from UAE market.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A number of students and protesters in Algeria stormed a press conference of the National Commission for Dialogue and Mediation, demanding the committee withdraw its papers, according to German News Agency (dpa)...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Port of London Authority says action on outstanding safety issue ‘long overdue’A vigil will be held on the banks of the Thames to mark the 30th anniversary of the Marchioness pleasure boat disaster in which 51 people died.Relatives and friends of the victims – whose average age was 22 – have been invited to carry candles and throw flower petals into the water on Monday evening. Police launches, along with those of the fire and rescue services, the Royal National Lifeboat Institution and the Port of London Authority (PLA) will gather at the spot on the river where the Marchioness sank after colliding with a dredger, the Bowbelle. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Hundreds of protesters had taken part of an Antifa riot in Portland city in Oregon, US, on Saturday that witnessed massive clashes and violence between counter-groups of protesters...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Owen Jones, Guardian journalist, says he was victim of 'premeditated assault'  Washington TimesGuardian Columnist Owen Jones Attacked Outside London Pub  SlateOwen Jones assaulted: Police appeal after 'senseless attack'  BBC NewsOwen Jones attacked outside London pub  The GuardianOwen Jones 'kicked in head' in London street attack  BBC NewsView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A Turkish and American joint military operations center for a Syrian “safe zone” will be fully activated next week, Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar announced on Friday...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    'Go look at President Trump's Twitter. He talked about Portland, said he's watching antifa. That's all we wanted,' organiser of far-right rally says
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Ministry of Foreign Affairs issues statement on Sunday.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    MAGA-supporting welterweight contender Colby Covington hasn't made many friends during his recent run in the UFC due to a series of outspoken antics, and the UFC 241 attendees certainly made him aware of it on Saturday night. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The official documents on a project titled "Yellowhammer" show that Britain will face shortages of fuel, food and medicine if it leaves the EU without a transition deal.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    As the crowd erupted into a thunderous roar to mark the signing of a declaration on Sudan's transitional constitution, 19-year-old Ali broke into tears for his dead brother...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Italy's fishermen often catch as much plastic as fish in their nets. Until recently it was illegal for them to bring the plastic to shore. But a recent change in law means it can now be brought back to port to be recycled.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Italy's fishermen often catch as much plastic as fish in their nets. Until recently it was illegal for them to bring the plastic to shore. But a recent change in law means it can now be brought back to port to be recycled.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Gibraltar has rejected a renewed US request demanding the seizure of the tanker Grace 1, which has been renamed Adrian Darya 1. The ship is expected to set sail from Gibraltar on Sunday evening. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Bothered by the massage card trash they find in their neighbourhood every day, five schoolboys have designed a smart 'collector' machine, hoping to put an end to the problem...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    ‘People don’t want to be stupid twice’: Foreign diplomats brace for Trump 2020 win  POLITICOThe expectation that Trump will win could affect how allies and adversaries approach negotiations with the U.S..
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world including continuing unrest in Hong Kong and Indonesia’s independence day celebrations Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Have you seen him?
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    'At this point, he'd better not back up, or we're going to look pretty foolish,' one farmer says
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    RT’s latest episode of The Keiser Report looks at what the infamous negative yielding bonds are made of, who profits from them – and who suffers losses. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A suicide bomber killed 63 people and wounded 182 in an attack on a packed wedding reception.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The police refused to lodge an FIR for days and the doctors did not provide treatment to the girl.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Research group Forensic Architecture collected images to use in ECHR caseNewly collated evidence documenting Russian military involvement in the conflict in Ukraine will be used to bolster legal claims against the Russian state by Ukrainian volunteer fighters.Forensic Architecture, a London-based research group, has collected and catalogued evidence of Russian military involvement in the battle of Ilovaysk in August 2014, including the presence of a model of tank used only by the Russian armed forces at that time. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Research group Forensic Architecture collected images to use in ECHR caseNewly collated evidence documenting Russian military involvement in the conflict in Ukraine will be used to bolster legal claims against the Russian state by Ukrainian volunteer fighters.Forensic Architecture, a London-based research group, has collected and catalogued evidence of Russian military involvement in the battle of Ilovaysk in August 2014, including the presence of a model of tank used only by the Russian armed forces at that time. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    More than 50 Iranian knowledge-based companies are slated to visit Chinese cities of Shenzhen and Shanghai in November 10-14, 2019, in a bid to develop ties with their counterparts and partners in the Far Eastern country...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A 2018 study conducted by MIT recently debunked the idea of all startup founders being in their 20s or 30s...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The top commander of the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC)’s Navy warns that foreign military presence in the Persian Gulf brings insecurity and instability to the region...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Every so often Mother Nature lets us know who’s boss with a display of her awesome power. One such casual flex was caught on video this week as a Carolina man miraculously dodged a lightning strike by the narrowest of margins. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Every so often Mother Nature lets us know who’s boss with a display of her awesome power. One such casual flex was caught on video this week as a Carolina man miraculously dodged a lightning strike by the narrowest of margins. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Ten candidates running independently in Tunisia’s upcoming presidential elections, slated for September, lodged court appeals against the initial roaster released by the higher electoral commission...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Refugees frequenting their war-ravaged countries on vacations will risk being deported from Germany, as such “holidaymaking” means they are no longer in danger at home, the European country’s interior minister has warned. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The human rights wing of Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) condemned the clampdown on Indian-administered Jammu and Kashmir by the Indian government...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Over two dozen rescuers try to save trapped cavers in Poland  ReutersBig rescue operation in Poland to find trapped cavers  BBC NewsDozens of rescuers try to save two trapped cavers in Poland  The GuardianView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Giles Duley photographs people in war zones. More importantly he cooks and eats with them firstGiles Duley, a 47-year-old photographer, is no stranger to some of the world’s most desperate places. His work on the impact of war has taken him to Lebanon, South Sudan, Ukraine and Afghanistan, where in 2011 he lost both legs and his left arm after stepping on a landmine. But his experience in Mosul, Iraq, in the spring of 2017, covering the fallout of the military campaign to retake the city from Islamic State, was something else.“I saw some of the worst things I’d ever seen in terms of war – just horrific things,” says Duley, shaking his head. “It was overwhelming and I came back in quite a dark place from that trip. It was shut the curtains, I don’t want to speak to anyone. And I just started cooking, I started making pasta and bread. I realised that was therapy for me, because when you’ve got those dark thoughts and you’ve seen children injured, you can put the television on or you can read a book, but you are still thinking about those things. You can’t get away from them. But I found cooking was the one time I did, because I think it’s the manual tasks: you are lost in that moment. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    An ambulance from a local philanthropy group came under attack on Saturday.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    No-Deal Brexit document leaked by former minister: UK government source  ReutersLONDON (Reuters) - Documents detailing the negative impact of a no-deal Brexit were leaked by a former minister in an attempt to try and influence the ...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Documents detailing the negative impact of a no-deal Brexit were leaked by a former minister in an attempt to try and influence the government's negotiations with the European Union, a government source said on Sunday.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A fire swept through a crowded slum in the Bangladeshi capital, Dhaka, destroying thousands of shanty homes. No one was killed. Many residents had left their homes to celebrate Eid al-Adha with their families, and some of those left homeless took refuge in schools closed for the holiday• Bangladesh fire leaves 10,000 homeless Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Leaked British government documents warning of the impact of a no-deal Brexit are based on a worst-case scenario, said Michael Gove, the minister in charge of coordinating preparations for leaving the European Union without a deal.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
      The controversy over Israel’s decision to ban two US Congresswomen; Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar from entering the country on political grounds is still ongoing...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A 46-year-old man has been arrested from Meerut for allegedly defrauding over 20 women through matrimonial and dating sites, police said on Saturday (August 17)...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Syrian state media and an opposition war monitor say government forces have gained more ground in the country's northwest, almost reaching the western outskirts of a major rebel-held town. The state SANA news agency says government troops made advances on Sunday around the rebel-held town of Khan Sheikhoun after intense fighting with insurgents. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, which tracks the war, said the troops are now about 1 kilometer, or half a mile, from Khan Sheikhoun in Idlib province, the last major rebel-held area in Syria.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Omar al-Bashir faces long jail term if convicted as country’s military leaders pave way for civilian ruleOmar al-Bashir, the former president of Sudan, will appear in court on Monday for the first day of a high-profile corruption trial that could end in the deposed autocratic ruler being jailed for many years.Bashir was forced out of power in April when security forces withdrew their support for his regime after months of popular protests. He is now in prison and will be charged with possessing foreign currency, corruption and receiving gifts illegally. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Omar al-Bashir faces long jail term if convicted as country’s military leaders pave way for civilian ruleOmar al-Bashir, the former president of Sudan, will appear in court on Monday for the first day of a high-profile corruption trial that could end in the deposed autocratic ruler being jailed for many years.Bashir was forced out of power in April when security forces withdrew their support for his regime after months of popular protests. He is now in prison and will be charged with possessing foreign currency, corruption and receiving gifts illegally. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Bristol is at the head of a food phenomenon that is helping residents better connect with their cities and each otherIf you travel by train into Bristol from north of the city, there is a point two miles from the centre when you can catch sight of a tiny farmyard. Nestling at the bottom of a railway embankment between houses, builders yards and a car rental depot, it has sties, snoozing Gloucester Old Spot pigs, a paddock with caramel-coloured Dexter cattle grazing and vegetable plots in which you might see the farmer and her three young children at work.It is not, as you might assume, a visitor attraction. Founded on the council-owned site of a former market garden, Purple Patch is a fully functioning four-acre smallholding that turns a profit from vegetable boxes, bagged salads and meat. Mary Conway, the 32-year-old who formerly worked for a veg-box scheme in Norwich, set it up five years ago and has become something of a local hero. Her salads – blends of unusual leaves, herbs and edible flowers – are popular in the nearby liberal enclave of St Werburghs. She lives in a converted shed on Purple Patch, with her kids and her husband, Jona, a carpenter, and finds any missing suburban comforts amply compensated for by the friendships she makes. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Three people have died following clashes between fans of rival Honduran football teams Olimpia and Motagua as violence inside and outside of the stadium left 10 people injured including former Celtic defender Emilio Izaguirre. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Police tape
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Clashing supporters stab and shoot each other as police fire tear gas and match is suspended
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Flooding rains and the threat of a tropical storm hit the southeast United States.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Cairo University has jumped 100 ranks to occupy a 301-400-category place in the 2019 Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) of Shanghai Ranking Consultancy...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Britain would be likely to face jammed ports and a hard border in Ireland if it left the European Union without a transition deal, according to government documents leaked to The Sunday Times of London.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Archie Bruce was found dead in his hotel bedroom. Pic: Twitter/@BatleyRLFC
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    To honour the author’s Nobel prize for literature, Angelou hosts a feast for 150 in her Winston-Salem homeMaya Angelou stands in the kitchen of her birdcage-lined home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, preparing a feast for a crowd of 150. It is September 1994. She is 66. She stews crowder peas and okra, and grills a sturdy mass of baron of beef to honour two guests: Toni Morrison, who was awarded the Nobel prize for literature the year before, and who died a fortnight ago, and US poet laureate Rita Dove.The house on Bartram Road would be cleared of its birdcages after Angelou’s death in 2014. After she died, the world honoured her work as a poet, a playwright and a memoirist, paying scant attention to her formidable skills as a cook. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    World tennis number one Novak Djokovic paid tribute to Daniil Medvedev after the Russian produced a brilliant serving display to knock him out of the Cincinnati Masters at the semi-final stage. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Specialist divers and volunteers continue to look for six-year-old who fell into Kent riverA six-year-old boy who was swept away after falling into a river is unlikely to be found alive, the police officer leading the search has said. Lucas Dobson slipped into the river Stour in Sandwich, Kent, on Saturday afternoon while on a fishing trip with family members.Supt Amanda Tillotson of Kent police said more than 100 members of the emergency services and about 200 volunteers had been taking part in what she said was a “massive operation”. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The 24-year-old IS fighter known as ‘Jihadi Jack’ has been stripped of his British citizenship, reportedly sparking a heated diplomatic row between the UK and Canada. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The 24-year-old IS fighter known as ‘Jihadi Jack’ has been stripped of his British citizenship, reportedly sparking a heated diplomatic row between the UK and Canada. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    At least 13 people were arrested on Saturday after hundreds of far-right protesters and anti-fascist counter-demonstrators faced off in Portland, Oregon.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Taliban denies responsibility for deadliest attack in capital city this year
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    With an international council now on the brink of declaring the species unsustainable – and Brexit looming – what is the future for one of the nation’s favourite meals?By 7.30am all the cod at Peterhead fish market had been sold, snapped up by competing buyers wearing thick fleeces, woolly hats and rubber boots against the chill of the vast indoor warehouse.A gaggle of middle-aged men clutching books of brightly coloured “tallies” followed the auctioneer alongside crates of glassy-eyed fish nestling in ice. With a curt nod or a swift hand gesture, the price was settled, tallies thrown down to indicate the fish’s new owner, and the group moved on. It took less than 10 minutes to dispose of the night’s catch. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    American and British military posturing in the Persian Gulf undermines regional security, the head of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard’s navy said. His warning comes as Gibraltar releases an Iranian tanker seized there by the UK. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Arwa Gouda seems to be enjoying her vacation and is sharing pictures about it on social media...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Leaked documents show the potentially devastating effects a no-deal Brexit could have on Britain.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Our photographer snaps this year’s performances, from an Oedipal election-night drama to Rose McGowan’s sci-fi-inflected fringe debut Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    At Razak's home, police seized cash, jewellery, handbags and watches worth up to $270m.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Israel said it opened fire on armed Palestinians on Gaza’s border overnight and Hamas’s health ministry reported three dead Sunday, the latest in a series of incidents along the tense barrier.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Israel said it opened fire on armed Palestinians on Gaza’s border overnight and Hamas’s health ministry reported three dead Sunday, the latest in a series of incidents along the tense barrier.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The TV series may have reached its conclusion, but with two books to finish as well as a host of spinoff projects, the writer of the novel series that spawned it is busier than everIf George RR Martin could be granted one wish, it would be for more time. The bestselling author of the Song of Ice and Fire saga, the books that became television phenomenon Game of Thrones, is in London for a talk with historian Dan Jones about his most recent work, Fire and Blood, an imagined history of the Targaryen family (the all-conquering ancestors of dragon queen Daenerys), before heading to the science-fiction event Worldcon in Dublin.Yet, at the back of his mind, is the work still to come. The Winds of Winter, the sixth and penultimate book in Ice and Fire, has to be finished and the seventh, A Dream of Spring, to be written. Then there’s a couple of Dunk and Egg stories set in the same world to complete. (Lighter in tone, he saw them as palate cleansers between “the big mega-books” but then “fell behind with everything, so now I’m just trying to think about the next thing immediately in front of me”.) Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The TV series may have reached its conclusion, but with two books to finish as well as a host of spinoff projects, the writer of the novel series that spawned it is busier than everIf George RR Martin could be granted one wish, it would be for more time. The bestselling author of the Song of Ice and Fire saga, the books that became television phenomenon Game of Thrones, is in London for a talk with historian Dan Jones about his most recent work, Fire and Blood, an imagined history of the Targaryen family (the all-conquering ancestors of dragon queen Daenerys), before heading to the science-fiction event Worldcon in Dublin.Yet, at the back of his mind, is the work still to come. The Winds of Winter, the sixth and penultimate book in Ice and Fire, has to be finished and the seventh, A Dream of Spring, to be written. Then there’s a couple of Dunk and Egg stories set in the same world to complete. (Lighter in tone, he saw them as palate cleansers between “the big mega-books” but then “fell behind with everything, so now I’m just trying to think about the next thing immediately in front of me”.) Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Leaked warnings about Gibraltar's ability to cope with a no-deal Brexit are wrong and out of date, the British territory said after the Sunday Times reported official planning documents.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Pro-China crowds are mostly middle-aged or older, the pro-democracy group is mostly made up of the younger generation.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A year into the job, chief executive is making cultural changes centred on listening to passengersCall this a crisis? There may be outrage at ever-rising fares on a railway system beset by problems but the last time Andrew Haines, who has just marked his first anniversary as chief executive of Network Rail, took on a fresh job, he made front pages as “the man who closed Britain”.His tenure at the Civil Aviation Authority was marked early on by the ash cloud crisis that shut down UK airspace. Haines can still fluently reel off the name of the Icelandic volcano, Eyjafjallajökull, whose eruption stopped aeroplanes flying over the UK for six days in 2010, briefly causing the kind of panic about essential imports that was novel before talk of a no-deal Brexit. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    PABest The cooling towers at the disused coal-fired Didcot power station in Oxfordshire are demolished. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday August 18, 2019. Demolition work began on the remains of the coal-fired power station where four workers were killed when it collapsed several years ago. Christopher Huxtable, 33, from Swansea, South Wales, Kenneth Cresswell, 57, and John Shaw, 61, both from Rotherham, South Yorkshire, and Michael Collings, 53, from Saltburn-by-the-Sea, Teesside, d
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Many are Indian-born and enjoy the rights of citizens, such as voting in elections
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Cheering crowds fill Khartoum streets after generals and protest leaders ink final deal for transitional government.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    'We hope we can show the world that Hong Kong people can be totally peaceful,' say organisers
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A woman needs to take on Trump - but the US is too scared
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    British energy minister Kwasi Kwarteng on Sunday dismissed concerns over potential food, fuel and drug shortages in the event of a no-deal Brexit as scaremongering.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/GettyThis story also appears at Documented, a non-profit news site devoted solely to covering New York City’s immigrants and the policies that affect their lives. Subscribe to their newsletter here. From the moment Mahmoud* was detained at the border, he told federal authorities he was 17 years old. He told them at the Border Patrol station. He told them at the Immigration and Customs Enforcement adult detention facility where he was held in Port Isabel, Texas. “They asked me for documents that prove I’m 17 years old and I provided all those documents,” he told Judge Frank Pimentel in the Port Isabel, Texas immigration court. “I’m assuming the government must have some basis for concluding that he is older than that,” Pimentel responded. The attorney for Immigration and Customs Enforcement told the judge the birth year they had would make Mahmoud 25 years old. “I’m sure [ICE deportation officers] would have looked into that already,” the ICE attorney said. ICE spent the next four months fighting to keep him in adult detention. Two years later, Mahmoud can hardly speak about the experience. “It was hard for me in there,” he said.  In detention, he could barely sleep and often woke up crying. “He wasn’t able to be his young self in detention,” said Carina Patritti, an attorney at the Legal Aid Society who has represented Mahmoud. “He had to grow up quickly.”Mahmoud says he gave ICE and CBP agents a copy of his birth certificate immediately after he was detained at the border. He fled his home country in West Africa at age 17 after the government targeted him due to his political participation. He quickly gathered some documents and clothing and flew to Brazil. From there, he traveled up to the US-Mexico border and crossed with a group of men from his country. Border Patrol agents found the group and arrested them. In the station, the agents put Mahmoud in a room with a French-speaking translator on speakerphone, he said. The agents asked Mahmoud about his age. He presented them with a copy of his birth certificate and a few other documents and spent the night at the station.“They continued to ask me. I told them again, I am 17,” he said in an interview. Eventually they hurried him into a van and drove him to the Port Isabel Detention Center, a detention facility for adults. Mahmoud says he told ICE and CBP agents repeatedly that he was 17 years old throughout his detention. Under the Flores settlement, a lawsuit from 1997, the U.S. government is only allowed to detain people under the age of 18 for 20 days, and only in facilities with higher standards of care than adult immigration detention centers. Mahmoud was held for about four months in a privately run facility for adults. Asylum seekers often flee in haste, grabbing what documents or valuables they can find before pushing towards the U.S.. Federal agents scrutinize their documents to spot fakes and catch people trying to game the system. Various branches of the Department of Homeland Security have entire units dedicated to detecting fraudulent documents. This scrutiny is partially due to the fact that minors are allotted more chances to file for asylum and have more freedoms in captivity. “Since 1997, there have been numerous developments affecting DHS’s and ORR’s age determinations, but there remains no real procedure by which conflicting evidence regarding age may be weighed by a neutral and detached decision maker,” said Carlos Holguín, general counsel at the Center for Human Rights & Constitutional Law, the civil-rights legal organization that brought the Flores case to court. Federal policy dictates that if a “reasonable person” would conclude that an immigrant detained by ICE is an adult, despite their claims to be a minor, then the government will “treat the person as an adult for all purposes.”ICE didn’t respond to a request for comment. In a court hearing, Mahmoud said that while traveling with a group of migrants through Panama, they had been stopped by border agents. “They were taking all the minors, keeping them and asking them questions,” he told Judge Pimentel, so he’d said that he was 25. “All right, well again, I don’t know anything about that. What we have to do now is to schedule your case for a hearing,” Pimentel responded. In a later hearing, the judge pushed back against ICE’s claims about Mahmoud’s age. “I respect the fact that [ICE agents are] making immediate type decisions and don’t always have the information at hand at the time. But the court is not going to base its determination of the respondents age on how the respondent looks to the court,” Pimentel said. He asked the ICE attorney to produce evidence to support their claim that Mahmoud was older than he said he was. The ICE attorney said that they reached out to the government of his home country—which Mahmoud was fleeing—to verify his birth certificate was genuine. They hadn’t received a response yet, but the Department of Homeland Security’s position on his age remained that Mahmoud “is not a juvenile and we would like to proceed as such,” the attorney said. Judge Pimentel asked the ICE attorney for more evidence to support their claim about his age and postponed the hearing for about two weeks. Mahmoud was silent during the exchange.The judge later added, “At some point, if I don’t get any answer, then we’ll be here until the summertime when at your claim, you turn 18, and then it won’t be an issue anymore.” Denise Slavin, a retired immigration judge, explained that immigration judges—who are employees of the Department of Justice, rather than part of the independent judicial branch of the government—don’t have jurisdiction over where detainees are held. “They can tell them what court their case will be in but not where they’re held,” she said.After the hearing, ICE agents took Mahmoud to get a dental examination to prove his age. The exam showed he was likely 16 to 22 years old, according to the court recordings. ICE released him to the ...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    How Trump's Policies Are Leaving Thousands of Asylum Seekers Waiting in Mexico  The New York TimesFor years, migrants arriving in Tijuana hoping to seek asylum in the United States have been told to add their names to a waiting list kept by Mexican immigration ...View full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Oregon city saw its largest far-right demonstration of the Trump era on Saturday, as 500 rightwingers travelled from around the country to march back and forth across the city’s bridges, and briefly occupy a patch of its waterfront. City authorities succeeded in preventing head-on confrontations between the demonstration and a much larger counter-protest. Police said they made 13 arrests, and seized weapons throughout the dayPortland rally: Proud Boys vow to march each month after biggest protest of Trump era Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Let’s save attention for things happening beyond what Donald Trump is spewing on a given day — including what he would rather have us ignore.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Ingeniously used, Kinder eggs could be responsible for a greater flow of goods than the botched ferry schemeHow many small plastic toy egg casings could be hidden in, for example, a Michael Gove? And, if we knew this figure, and had an accurate idea of potential volunteer multiple plastic toy egg couriers, could we extrapolate from it the volume of goods that might be secretly transported, in this fashion, both in and out of our ring-fenced island nation? And why is knowing this number an important part of planning for the no-deal Brexit that our uncooperative friends in George Soros’s Europe, and the traitorous MPs who collaborate with them, are cruelly forcing on us through no fault of our own?A civil servant I was in Woodcraft Folk with 43 years ago regularly texts me about bizarre developments in the National Centre For No-Deal Planning, despite risking her job to do so. “They’ve got us hard at work finding out how we get components and medicines and essential items into the country, if or when the supply lines break down. Don’t forget to stockpile toilet roll, Stewey! It may end up being the only viable form of currency!! LOL!!!” Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Exclusive: Musiy Rishin speaks out about landlord who wants wealthier tenants and has fought to evict him and his dying sonMusiy Rishin knows how to survive.He narrowly escaped the Nazis’ massacre of Jews in the Ukraine in 1941. His family lived through wartime famine, and an earthquake in Uzbekistan, before they fled political turmoil in 1998. He persevered after the recent deaths of his wife and son. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Jeffrey Epstein 'Friend' Ghislaine Maxwell Has More Skeletons in Her Family Closet Than a House of Horrors  The Daily BeastJeffrey Epstein apparently bought women's panties while in jail  New York Post Epstein's purported madam now a focus in sex abuse cases  ABC NewsDocuments Show Efforts by Jeffrey Epstein’s Attorneys to Sway Prosecutors  The Wall Street JournalEpstein's gal pal gave $1K to hospital that treated alleged sex slave: report  New York Post View full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Photo Illustration by The Daily BeastI have become, it seems, something of a collector: old magazines filled with young starlets, Mason jars full of homemade concoctions, confidants who were once wayward lovers, and a cat who hasn’t lived with his rightful owner—my now grown middle child—for too many years. There is a row of empty ceramic planters lining my window sill, awaiting soil and seeds and a goodness that will never arrive.Then there are the scars, both physical and emotional, that I have collected—too numerous, it seems, and too painful to count. Sometimes, I run my fingers across the blemishes—the nicks and pits and disfigurements—that litter my body. There are few mirrors in my house, lest I am forced to see the fullness of their bounty. Each one whispers its own story. Each one holds its own trauma, some petty and some profound, one and all a maker of all that is me. A thin brown keloid marks the spot along my right heel, sliced open by a broken bottle in the yard some 46 years ago when we lived in a Duck Hill public housing project. There are various other cuts and burns, some abrasions from scraping concrete, hopping fences and climbing trees. They remind me of the moments when I rejected my girlness, the femininity that left me vulnerable and afraid. I rarely think about them now or even about the small rise of skin on my back, where a man who swore he loved me shoved a blade into the meat of my shoulder as I ran screaming for my life. I tell myself that, for the most part, I have let them and the circumstances that wrought them go, and that some things, like the cat at my feet, must simply be embraced. There are a few, though, that have yet to heal. Goldie Taylor—An Open Letter to the Young Woman ‘Raped at Spelman’It was the most beautiful thing I had ever seen—a 24-inch orange 10-speed with a black seat and matching vinyl-wrapped handlebars. I first spotted it on the lower floor of a Northwest Plaza department store. My godfather, Thom Puckett, promised that if I helped out around his Sinclair gas station, he would “see about that bicycle.” I swept the stockroom, grabbed extra cans of motor oil for my “uncle” Frank, and washed window shields for every customer that pulled up to a full-service pump. Puckett, who would later buy and teach me to drive my first car, made good on his word. It was 1980 and I had just finished sixth grade. I had been elected student council president in an all-white school. The gravity of that missed me. They were simply my friends. Some still are. We played together in a creek awash with nuclear waste, ferried cakes to celebrate Mrs. Bateman’s birthday, and learned to swim at Tiemeyer Park. I could not know it then, but the world was changing around me as the evening news carried stories of an Olympic boycott, a child born from a test tube, a presidential election, and American hostages in Iran. I remember witnessing a solar eclipse from the back playground at Buder Elementary School, our makeshift viewfinders fashioned from shoeboxes. Even then, I was mesmerized by it all. Johnny Carson was the king of late night television. CNN aired its maiden newscast. My older sister got married and had a baby that summer.Weeks after Mt. St. Helen’s spewed its lava, smoke and ash into the sky, I pulled the bike from the side yard and left our small pale green house on St. Christopher Lane. It was morning, the sun still low but already burning away the dewy air. My legs, even with the saddle lowered flush with the frame’s top tube, were barely long enough to reach the pedals. I was headed to summer camp, a free city-run program at Schafer Park. It wasn’t far. Maybe a half mile. I proudly parked my bike alongside the gazebo and spent the day playing checkers, swatting tennis balls and stringing colorful beads.Some time that afternoon, I started the way home, pushing my way up sloping St. Williams Lane. Clumsily switching gears, I felt a tug at my bicycle seat as I hit the top up the small incline. It was a familiar face—an older boy, maybe 16 or 17, named Chris. What unfolded next left a wound so deep and abiding that, until this summer, I could not speak it aloud. I told myself that, like the stack of cookbooks I never open, this was a chapter best left closed. I told myself it did not matter. I remember being led down a path that led to Hoech Jr. High School and through the parking lot to a house on the other side of Ashby Road, just south of Tiemeyer Park. He pushed me through the door of a screened-in back porch, yanked down my blue and white basketball shorts, and raped me on the slat board flooring.I was eleven years old. I remember the long walk home, the darkening sky above and the buzzing winged insects that danced around the streetlights. Long after the last of the sun had drifted from the sky, I sat on our painted concrete porch sobbing, waiting for somebody to come home. My panties bloodied, my arms and knees scraped. The pain seemed to come from everywhere. I waited there with my cat Lucky, afraid to go inside until my mother turned into the gravel drive. I was unmoored. I had no idea what that meant then, but it seems the only fitting word writing this now. I belonged nowhere, and to no one specifically. Nobody took me to see a doctor. Not for my injuries, not for the infection that came after. Nobody went to the police or even sat me down to talk through what happened. My mother gave me two pills—antibiotics I assume—and rubbed ointment on the boil. I remember the pitying look she gave me, and the anger she seemed to have for me. I ...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The fire broke out in a crowded shanty town and destroyed about 2,000 mostly tin homes.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    An oval, 14.83-carat pink gem cut in Moscow has been valued by the Gemological Institute of America at a minimum of $60 million (€54 million), one of the highest prices ever fetched by a diamond. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Islam Times- Gibraltar has rejected a renewed US request demanding the seizure of the tanker Grace 1, which has been renamed Adrian Darya 1.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A bus carrying Chinese tourists hit a lamppost on a busy Moscow thoroughfare on Sunday, injuring nearly 30 people. The accident has been blamed on the driver. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A bus carrying Chinese tourists hit a lamppost on a busy Moscow thoroughfare on Sunday, injuring nearly 30 people. The accident has been blamed on the driver. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Customer reportedly opens fire because sandwich was not prepared quickly enough, police told
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Three people are killed and several hurt in fighting between fans, after a team bus is attacked.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Some foreign-policy disagreements are necessary and some are a matter of choice. The current low ebb of relations between Japan and the Republic of Korea (ROK) is more the latter rather than the former. U.S. interests not only dictate doing more to restore allied harmony, but also advise strongly against compounding tensions.Yet President Donald Trump is demanding a rapid and steep increase in host-nation support from Japan and the ROK at a time when those Northeast Asian allies are engaged in a dangerous intra-alliance squabble. Trump is right to want prosperous allies to shoulder greater burdens. He is especially justified in desiring the redistribution of allied costs when the chief security challenge is mutual defense against the neighbors of U.S. allies.  However, just as the protection of the homeland is an overriding responsibility of the commander in chief, so, too, should national security concerns take precedence over financial ones. America can live with less than perfectly reciprocal and equitable alliances—they’ve always been that way anyway. But the United States really should not risk trying to go it alone in a dangerous world. Deterring North Korea, managing China, building a region of networked security partners to stand up to revisionist powers, and signaling the durability of U.S. leadership are all vital. They are more important than trying to extract more financial support from allied countries that host American forces at this tenuous moment. Moreover, on top of the recent sharp deterioration in relations between Tokyo and Seoul, there is already excessive doubt in the region about U.S. reliability and staying power. The Trump administration’s stated vision of a free-and-open Indo-Pacific region is rightly predicated on leveraging effective alliances. Allies and partners are critical to reinforcing Washington’s postwar system, which is under siege from rival powers. As the Department of Defense regional strategy report declares, the “U.S.-Japan Alliance is the cornerstone of peace and security in the Indo-Pacific” and the “U.S.-ROK Alliance is the linchpin of peace and prosperity in Northeast Asia, as well as the Korean Peninsula.”If America’s cornerstone and linchpin are damaged, then it follows that Washington’s Indo-Pacific strategy is also badly encumbered. First, the fraying ties between Seoul and Tokyo hamper America’s North Korea policy. Specifically, Washington’s diverted attention helps Kim Jong-un with his divide-and-rule tactics and could undermine deterrence in a crisis. America enjoys maximum leverage on North Korea when policies are tightly aligned among Seoul, Washington and Tokyo. Washington should have learned this during the Perry process—when former Secretary of Defense Bill Perry engaged in concerted trilateral diplomacy to repair cracks in alliance solidarity—at the end of the 1990s. Certainly, the Kim regime works hard to keep all outside powers at odds, and recent missile launches are in part a test of alliance solidarity. If America’s attempt at negotiating with North Korea is to have any chance of success, then U.S. allies need to be aligned. The United States has been able to engage in experimental diplomacy for two reasons. First, Kim is boxed in because he cannot actually use his weapons without unacceptable risk. Second, he cannot develop his economy without substantive steps toward denuclearization. Whether U.S. diplomacy with North Korea ultimately succeeds or fails, and whether Washington is in need of help with North Korean infrastructure or alliance missile defenses, the ROK, the United States and Japan will all need each other.A second, related problem is that crisis among U.S. allies hinders dealing with a world in which there is resurgent major power competition. The alliance drift—suggested by a failure to stem the falling out of Japan and South Korea—impedes cooperation for managing an increasingly assertive China and a Russia desperate to remain relevant. Current alliance troubles especially play into Beijing’s unrelenting narrative that U.S. alliances are relics of the past. That propaganda line argues that the whole postwar system failed to account for PRC ambitions and the future of the “China dream.”One of the unintended effects of Japan’s recent decision to enforce tighter control over the export of chemicals critical to South Korean manufacturing of semiconductors and display panels is that Seoul could become more dependent on China for those imports. This is advantageous for Beijing because it is in the midst of pushing national champion companies beholden to the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) to dominate cutting-edge technologies.Although few countries are signing up to the CCP slogan of a “community of common destiny,” the pushback against U.S. leadership and power is prevalent in parts of Asia, even in some allied governments. If responding to the China challenge to rewrite the rules and dominate critical technologies that are key to commanding the twenty-first-century economy is indeed an overriding strategic objective, the United States will need to do a better job of mobilizing others, beginning with its cornerstone and linchpin allies.Finally, the dispute between Japan and South Korea perpetuates rising nationalism, protectionism, and unilateralism. The (not completely) unintended impact of an “America First” slogan is that any domestic appeal and support is more important than any overseas revulsion. But it is not enough to criticize the administration. After all, other countries in Asia put their country first, time and again. They all have national industrial policies and more closed economic systems. Even America’s closest allies enjoy an element of free riding—especially as the challenges mount and allies and partners fail to pick up the rising tab for security public goods.But these realities do not alter what is essential for U.S. national security and what is simply desirable. The Trump administration is simultaneously attempting to arrest China’s bad behavior and most-threatening power gains, while seeking a serious adjustment on power and burden-sharing with effective allies. This includes pressure to correct trade imbalances, as well as demands for the allies to shoulder greater burdens for regional security.The United States cannot afford the extravagance an unnecessary argument among its closest allies. Instead of managing a proliferating North Korea and an assertive, rising China, Washington must now manage the perception of America as a declining superpower with weakening regional security architecture. That means Trump needs to lengthen the ...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    China has continually assured the world that its Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) is a green project. At the first BRI forum in May 2017, Chinese president Xi Jinping touted BRI as a “vision of green development and a way of life and work that is green, low-carbon, circular and sustainable.” Similar promises were made at this year’s forum in April. However, China has long been the world’s largest exporter of coal power equipment, exporting twice as much as its nearest competitor. At the same time as the first forum, Chinese companies were building an estimated 140 coal plants abroad, including in countries like Egypt and Pakistan that previously burned little to no coal. At the current rate, Chinese coal plant developers will drive energy investments that make it impossible to limit global warming to safe levels. If Chinese development banks continue their current practices, then pollution will inevitably worsen around the world.The Belt and Road’s Dirty TruthsMuch of what Beijing touts as development assistance for power projects worsens pollution. Nearly 40 percent of Chinese Development Bank (CDB) and Chinese Ex-Im spending on electricity generation has gone toward coal. As a result, the amount of coal-fired generation Chinese policy banks are directly responsible for between 2013, the year that BRI was announced, and 2018 could generate enough electricity to power Norway or Poland. This surge in coal-fired generation will come with a drastic emissions increase. Chinese development finance flows between 2013 and 2018, by conservative estimates, will contribute to annual emissions equivalent to that of the Netherlands. Overall, projects backed by Chinese development banks will produce more coal-fired power globally than clean energy generation, setting the path ahead in the wrong direction. If it were not for government support, then Chinese coal power suppliers almost certainly would not be as successful and global emissions would be fewer.The CDB and Chinese Ex-Im financed power plants in thirty-eight countries since 2013, nearly half of which are fossil fuel-based. Most Chinese-financed, coal-fired power plants built overseas use low-efficiency, subcritical coal technology, which produces some of the highest emissions of any form of power generation. In more than one-third of countries, projects funded by the Chinese development banks increase national emissions intensity. That is, Chinese foreign aid makes those countries’ power sectors higher emitting than before.The picture is even worse in countries where China has concentrated efforts. In Pakistan, where Beijing has focused massive amounts of BRI spending through the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor, China has financed so much coal that its power investments are more than twice as emissions heavy as Pakistan’s electric grid was in 2012. Overall, as Chinese development finance in a country’s power sector increases, it becomes harder for that country to lower emissions.Beijing did not finance fossil fuel projects in more than half of the thirty-eight countries, but China’s non-fossil fuel projects constitute one-off investments over the six-year period. Moreover, nearly all those non-fossil fuel projects are not wind and solar but hydroelectric dams, which carry their own environmental damage. China’s hydroelectric projects portend ruin for millions of farmers and fishermen.Better Alliances and Best PracticesThe United States should not allow China to freely and falsely claim the mantle of global environmental and clean energy leadership. BRI marks a new era of U.S.-China global competition, in which Chinese funding for development and infrastructure projects could bring Beijing economic and strategic benefits at America’s expense. Take Southeast Asia, for example—Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, and Vietnam all receive Chinese development finance for power generation projects. The region is home to the Straits of Malacca, the second largest oil trade chokepoint after Hormuz, several U.S. military installations, and the world’s fastest-growing economic market.As it stands, Beijing is leveraging environmentally and socially harmful infrastructure projects for diplomatic capital that blunts America’s Indo-Pacific military presence and gives it a competitive advantage over the United States in an important emerging market. On the other side of Asia, Beijing-backed coal projects are, in part, helping the Chinese Communist Party deepen defense cooperation with Islamabad while worsening air pollution that already causes tens of thousands of premature deaths annually.The State Department should highlight these environmental and social costs and the comparative advantage of U.S. power projects under Indo-Pacific Strategy initiatives, which seek to grow the region’s energy markets while minimizing environmental impact. If the United States firmly communicates the environmental and social costs of Chinese development finance, then Beijing’s reputation should suffer accordingly amid a growing global backlash to BRI.Further, the United States should cement ongoing partnerships with Australia, India, and Japan—some of America’s strongest allies in the Indo-Pacific region—to internationalize new standards on “quality infrastructure.” Even with the creation of the new International Development Finance Corporation (DFC), the United States cannot compete dollar for dollar with BRI. This burden-sharing strategy will help pool and coordinate funds competing with Beijing.The United States will find it difficult to sway countries away from Chinese development finance and China away from financing low-quality coal projects. That China has been supporting coal abroad while canceling coal projects at home is simple self-interest: Beijing sees coal equipment exports as a solution for excess industrial capacity. Beijing must keep legacy coal manufacturers afloat because the Chinese coal industry and steel industry, which depends on coal, supply roughly twelve million Chinese jobs. The United States should consider the important role that domestic concerns play in Beijing’s development assistance plans and pursue strategies that help assuage them. The Energy Department could facilitate projects to transition coal and steelworkers in both the United States and China into roles in the clean energy economy, such as the production and installation of solar panels and wind turbines.Convincing Beijing Despite repeated claims of “green development,” President Xi tacitly admitted BRI’s first phase has been an environment failure. After the second Belt and Road Forum, the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs released a list of deliverables that include many efforts to make BRI greener. The United States can independently verify and communicate widely whether China is making progress toward these goals. Unless the United States ...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A Conor McGregor vs Nate Diaz trilogy fight has been high up on many fans' MMA wish lists for a while but, after Diaz returned with a win at UFC 241 and called out another big name, there might be an even better fight in the mix. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Desert Storm was the Aardvark’s last hurrah. The F-111 was finally withdrawn from U.S. Air Force service in 1998. Though the Aardvark was good at its job, it had high maintenance costs, and the Air Force judged that its fleet of F-15E Strike Eagles could take care of shorter-range attack missions, while B-1 bombers could handle longer range strikes.The General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark was a low-altitude strike plane born out of a shotgun wedding between competing Air Force and Navy requirements—with Defense Secretary McNamara as the minister. Despite its troubled adolescence, it grew into a capable high-tech night bomber that lasted decades in service, noted for its sleekly elegant profile.(This first appeared in 2016.)Troubled ConceptionIn the early 1960s, the Air Force came to realize that new, radar-guided surface-to-air missiles such as the Soviet SA-2 could reach its slow, high-altitude bombers. In response, it devised a new concept: a smaller long-range supersonic bomber that could skim close to the ground, below radar systems. At the same time, the U.S. Navy was looking for a fast, long-range carrier-based interceptor armed with air-to-air missiles that could take out Soviet bombers from a distance.Newly appointed Defense Secretary Robert McNamara was convinced that a single aircraft could satisfy both requirements, thereby saving on development costs. The Army and Navy were less keen on compromising their visions, but were forced to cooperate on the so-called TFX program. A contract was awarded to General Dynamics in 1962. Because the design was smaller than Air Force strategic bombers, and the service eschewed the “attack” designation used by the Navy, it was designated with an “F” for fighter.Revolutionary DesignThe F-111 was built around two powerful yet fuel-efficient TF30 turbofan engines with new afterburner technology. A capacious fuselage could accommodate bomb loads of up to 31,000 pounds and fuel for missions up 2,500 miles long, with external tanks adding another 1,000 miles. The large plane weighed twenty tons empty—or more than twice that loaded.The designers of the F-111 faced a challenge: they needed a plane that could fly at very high speeds, but still take off or land on a short runway. Using smaller wings would create less drag, allowing the aircraft to fly faster—but also create less lift, requiring the aircraft achieve higher speeds before it take off, in turn necessitating a longer runway. For example, the other supersonic fighter-bomber of the era, the F-105 Thunderchief, had very small wings—and required airstrips over a mile long for takeoff, limiting which airfields it could operate from.The F-111’s designers adopted the new technology of variable-geometry, or “swing” wings. These permitted the wings to swing out during takeoff to generate maximum lift, and then would tuck inward midflight to achieve higher speeds. The F-111 was the first of several major designs that used the technology.The two-man crew sat side by side in a cockpit pod. If they needed to escape, a rocket boosted the pod upward, which then floated to the ground on a parachute, just like a space capsule.A key innovation was the F-111’s revolutionary new terrain-following radar, which mapped the ground directly in front of the plane and then automatically adjusted the flight path to avoid collision. This allowed F-111s to fly as low as two hundred feet above the surface and make precise adjustments at high speed without crashing—even when flying at night, or in bad weather conditions. The F-111’s talent for hunting in darkness, nose close to the ground, was what earned it the appellation “Aardvark.”Early F-111s did show promise, capable of flying over the speed of sound at Mach 1.2 at low-altitude, or more than double that (Mach 2.5) at high altitude—all the while requiring only a 2,000 foot runway to land. It was the first tactical aircraft to cross from the United States to Europe without mid-air refueling.However, the F-111’s design was biased in favor of the Air Force’s specifications. The carrier-based interceptor version, the F-111B, performed abominably in trials, struggling to exceed Mach 1. The expensive forced compromise that was the naval version was finally scrapped, leaving everyone millions of dollars poorer. Many of the more promising design elements of the F-111B made it over to the F-14 Tomcat, however.Deployment in AsiaThe Air Force F-111s didn’t have an auspicious debut in combat. After a detachment of six F-111As was deployed to Vietnam in 1968, three of them crashed in just fifty-five missions, all of them accidents linked to defective wing stabilizers. The Air Force was forced to withdraw the F-111 and correct the flaw at a cost of $100 million.Recommended: Why an F-22 Raptor Would Crush an F-35 in a 'Dogfight'Recommended: Air War: Stealth F-22 Raptor vs. F-14 Tomcat (That Iran Still Flies)Recommended: A New Report Reveals Why There Won't Be Any 'New' F-22 RaptorsIt wasn’t until the Linebacker raids in 1972 that the F-Aardvark finally demonstrated its potential. Skimming beneath North Vietnam’s extensive radar network at night, F-111s blasted North Vietnamese airfields and air defense batteries, weakening the resistance to incoming B-52 raids. Aardvarks didn’t require the fighter escort, electronic warfare support, or midair refueling that other bombers required, and could operate in inclement weather. Only six F-111s were lost in combat over the course 4,000 missions during the war, one of the lowest loss rates of the war.F-111s ended up participating in the last combat operation undertaken by the U.S. military in South East Asia, when the Cambodian Khmer Rouge seized the container ship S.S. Mayaguez in May 1975. Two Aardvarks diverted from a training flight were the first to locate the Mayaguez. Later, an F-111 sank a Khmer Rouge patrol boat escorting the seized ship.Variants563 F-111s of all variants were built. After the F-111A, the F-111D and E models upgraded the Aardvark’s electronics and engine inlets, and increased the thrust of the engines. Another variant, the FB-111, was designed as a strategic bomber with improved engines, stretched two feet longer to accommodate additional fuel. Seventy-five of these served in Strategic Air Command units.The F-111C was sold exclusively to Australia. It incorporated a ...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Workers ordered not to criticise president
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    PLA concepts and capabilities also include military and para-military forces that operate below the threshold of war, such as increased presence in contested waters of fishing fleets and supporting maritime militia and navy vessels. These operations might spark conflict when an opposing claimant such as the Philippines, Vietnam, or Japan responds.Americans are slowly but undeniably facing a new reality in global great power relations that will define the trajectory of U.S. foreign policy for the foreseeable future. The 2017 U.S. National Security Strategy and 2018 National Defense Strategy mark an acknowledgment by not only the current administration but also a broad, bipartisan swath of government and private sector entities that China's increasing swagger as it emerges on the world stage warrants a more confrontational approach toward the country.Although untested in battle for four decades, China’s military is one reason for the nation’s growing confidence. The People’s Liberation Army, or PLA, has modernized and could become an attractive tool for Chinese leaders weighing options to solve regional disagreements. As American policymakers and legislators consider responses—and commit taxpayer resources accordingly—perhaps it’s time for Americans to raise their PLA awareness. Enter the “Annual Report to Congress: Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China 2019,” authored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense and released Thursday.For nearly two decades, annual iterations of this report have served as perhaps the most essential openly accessible source for understanding the PLA. This year's version goes beyond reporting on PLA's progress to outline its role in China's effort to gain preeminence in the Indo-Pacific region—an effort encompassing a range of economic, foreign policy, and national security initiatives. A report that has primarily served as a resource for military analysts has become increasingly useful to a broader audience seeking to understand China's strategic objectives.This year’s report covers three areas that should be of interest to legislators, leaders, and laypeople concerned about the defense of American interests over the next few decades. First, the report provides strategic context, noting that the PLA is but one aspect of growing Chinese power and operates beyond China’s borders in a very limited fashion when compared with other levers of power. The report highlights global “influence operations” supported by China’s economic clout. These are Chinese efforts to develop “power brokers” or centers of influence for coercive interference in the sovereign activities of other nations, despite Beijing’s stated position of non-interference in the affairs of others. Second, the report provides details on President Xi Jinping’s military restructuring efforts and mobilization of resources across Chinese society to build a force capable of fighting regional wars. PLA capabilities increasingly align with China’s regional objectives, providing credible options for enforcing territorial claims disputed by American allies and partners on Taiwan, in the South and East China Seas, and along the Sino-Indian border. New geographic commands responsible for operations on and beyond China’s periphery provide a link between joint forces and the regional wars they may be directed to fight, shoring up decades-old weaknesses. Vast improvements in strategic support to military operations from space, counter-space, and cyber forces underpin a growing regional precision strike capability, challenging U.S. and allied forces that might respond to regional crises.PLA concepts and capabilities also include military and para-military forces that operate below the threshold of war, such as increased presence in contested waters of fishing fleets and supporting maritime militia and navy vessels. These operations might spark conflict when an opposing claimant such as the Philippines, Vietnam, or Japan responds.Third, the report provides needed insight into Chinese perspectives, sounding alarm bells without being overly alarmist. Chinese leaders fear being contained by the more competitive stance reflected in U.S. security and defense strategies, the report notes. Understanding China’s threat perceptions, while remaining clear-eyed regarding differences in objectives, is essential to developing strategies to deter conflict.The report also highlights the importance of maintaining open lines of communications between the U.S. military and the PLA, with contacts designed to "maintain a constructive, results-oriented relationship with China." While the Department of Defense doesn't want to help the PLA become more capable or lethal, its doors are open to resolve issues related to U.S. and Chinese forces operating in the Indo-Pacific and to avoid misunderstandings in the event of crisis.In rolling out the report, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Indo-Pacific Security Affairs Randall Schriver noted, that “while the National defense Strategy emphasizes competition, we certainly don’t seek conflict with China and it doesn’t preclude cooperation where our interests align.” America and the region thrive where trade, people, and ideas flow in stable fashion, and where China participates and resolves issues without resorting to military force. Americans and our allies and partners need to better understand the strategic lay of the land if we are going to mobilize resources wisely for a long-term competition with China that reinforces these interests. Cortez A. Cooper III is a senior international policy analyst at the nonprofit, nonpartisan RAND Corporation.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    This is my life now, says Séamas O’Reilly, territorially marked by a baby who produces snot as if he’s stockpiling for BrexitOn those rare occasions when I do leave the house for social interactions, I’ve been bringing little mementos from home with me. Having sat down for a drink or the first bite of a nice meal, my conversational partner will point at my clothes and ask, innocently, what ‘that’ is. I don’t have to look as the answer is always the same. That silvery snail trail on my shoulder is not hair gel or fallen rain, it is the snot of my sputum-rich son.This is my life now; territorially marked by a baby who produces snot as if he’s stockpiling for Brexit. I’m sure I could get loads of laughs by here describing the horror of each variety, from crunchy dust to oleaginous slime. I could sing winsome country ballads about the mess of thin, clear gel which seeps like fig jam, if it were secreted by a hagfish. Then there’s the emerald sawdust that sets into his face, congealing into a hard film on contact. Removing this is like scraping a bowl of cornflakes you neglected at breakfast, requiring you to place one foot on the highchair for greater purchase as you chisel it off. I could even shock and delight you with a grotesque dissertation on all the many and varied things he does with all this snot once he gets his hands on it. Luckily, I find the topic so distasteful I’ll refrain from such detail. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Wherever you are in the world, this week we’d like to see your pictures on the theme ‘appetite’The next theme for our weekly photography assignment, published in print in the Observer New Review is ‘appetite’.Share your photos of what appetite means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The astronomer royal and risk specialist on cyber-attacks, pandemics, Brexit and life on MarsMartin Rees is a cosmologist and astrophysicist who has been the astronomer royal since 1995. He is also a co-founder of the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk, Cambridge. His most recent book, On the Future: Prospects for Humanity, is published by Princeton.After Boris Johnson’s recent announcement of an increase in the number of special visas for scientists, Sir Andre Geim accused him of taking scientists “for fools”. Did you feel patronised by the announcement? I wouldn’t put it that way. Anything that makes it easier to get visas is welcome but won’t remove the serious downsides of Brexit. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Labour is short of money, undecided about its key messages and about to unleash deselection mayhem on its own MPsBe careful what you ask for. Labour relentlessly demands a general election, and may attempt to bring one about in the autumn, but is the party in good shape to fight what will be one of the most critical campaigns in our modern history? When I put this important, yet neglected, question to one senior figure in the party, he responded with blunt candour: “No, we’re not ready. Not remotely ready.”Let’s break it down into five components: candidates, leadership, messages, mobilisation and money. In each category, Labour faces difficulties. Some are relatively mild. Other handicaps are severe and hard, even impossible to address in the very little time that may be left before an election is upon us. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Aid agencies should be champions for gender equality – so why do female employees face violence and discrimination from men who see them as ‘too pretty for complex issues’?Is sexual harassment the most important issue facing female humanitarians? If you say yes, you are not alone. In a poll promoted on social media, 41% of respondents identified harassment as the top concern for female aid workers.Our survey results reinforce decades of research – evidence that has fallen on deaf ears and failed to spark concrete change. For women working in humanitarian settings, the greatest risks they face in responding to emergencies come from their very own employers. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    As the prime minister heads for the Biarritz summit, he has no relationship with the other governments and very little trustFor weeks things have been quiet in the summer heat. But in recent days the normal diplomatic back-channelling between London, Brussels, Paris, Berlin and Rome has cranked into gear before the G7 meeting in Biarritz of the world’s most advanced economies.British officials have been liaising with their EU counterparts on how to get on the right side of the trade war between the US and China, tread a diplomatic fine line over the European-backed Iranian nuclear deal opposed by Donald Trump and get the rhetoric right on the precarious situation in Hong Kong in the presence of the Chinese leader Xi Jinping. “This is a diplomatic quagmire of a G7,” said a European diplomat. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Socialite’s lawyers combed through life of billionaire’s alleged abuse victim when she was sued for libelThe lengths to which Ghislaine Maxwell went to contest allegations that she conspired with Jeffrey Epstein to groom underage girls for sex is laid bare in an analysis of hundreds of pages of legal documents unsealed this month.The documents form part of a defamation action brought four years ago by Virginia Giuffre, who alleged that the British socialite was instrumental in grooming her to become one of his underage “sex slaves”, allegations Maxwell has previously denied. Giuffre accused Maxwell of libelling her by calling her a liar in public. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Nicolas Dujovne quits as the currency plummets following the president's astounding poll defeat.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Iran’s meddling across the Middle East is increasing. Iranian Revolutionary Guardsmen seize ships, Iranian proxies fire missiles into neighboring countries, and the Islamic Republic continues to seek a land bridge to the Mediterranean. Enabling Tehran’s malign outreach is its oil wealth. Iran possesses the fourth largest known oil reserves in the world. Eighty percent of Iran’s oil is found in Khuzestan, the southwestern province at the head of the Gulf. A century ago, the region—once known as Arabistan, or “land of the Arabs”—was practically independent under Sheikh Khaz’al bin Jabir. In 1925, however, the same year the shah changed Persia’s name to Iran, the shah kidnapped him and held him under house arrest in Tehran while Iranian troops moved into Khorramshahr (then known as Mohammerah). Occupation followed. Khaz’al never returned. In 1936, assassins murdered him in his sleep.Across administrations and both before and after the 1979 Islamic Revolution, successive U.S. administrations recognized Iranian unity and effectively blessed Iranian conquest of the Arab emirate. Had U.S. policy instead recognized that Arabistan has its own history and people distinct from Iran, then it is unlikely that the Islamic Republic of Iran could sponsor the terrorism in which it now engages.For centuries, Persians used the term “Arabistan” to refer to what is now southwestern Iran simply because they recognized that it was ethnically and linguistically distinct. With many of Persia’s largest cities in the interior of the Persian plateau, Arabistan was also secluded, separated from the rest of Iran by the Zagros Mountains. Arabistan’s tribal governance was traditionally distinct from Iran’s monarchy and bureaucracy. The leaders of Arabistan were fine with their loose arrangement with Tehran, believing the protection of the Persian shahs to be preferable to subjugation, harassment and economic exploitation by Ottoman Turks. Indeed, Iranian shahs took little interest in Arabistan until the discovery of oil there in the first decade of the twentieth century.Iranian leaders often claim to defend victims of oppression and discrimination across the region, whether they be Shia communities in other countries or the Palestinians in conflict with Israel. Despite their lofty rhetoric, they have failed to address their own oppression and discrimination against the Arabs whose oil-rich land they have exploited for decades. The discrimination is vast: Ethnic Arabs in Arabistan are not allowed to name their children Arabic names unless they were also the names of major Shia figures. Amnesty International has chronicled the disappearances and executions of ethnic Arabs across the province, as authorities in Tehran seek to complete their slow-motion ethnic cleansing.Both the United States and its regional partners appear perplexed at how to respond to increasing Iranian aggression. They have tried all the usual diplomatic and economic mechanisms of statecraft, but most do not want war with Iran. Still, despite the Trump administration’s “maximum pressure campaign,” Iranian officials siphon off enough oil to fund and to continue their support for insurgencies and terrorism campaigns. Perhaps, then, the time is now to deny Iran the resources it wastes, restore regional stability, and right a historic wrong by setting Arabistan free.Sheikh Abdullah Al Khazaal is the grandson of Sheikh Khaz’al and a graduate of New York University Abu Dhabi.Image: Reuters.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A woman from Kazakhstan has given birth to two children, two-and-a-half months apart, due to her body’s unique features. Medics say it’s a miracle that both babies are alive and well. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Didcot A Power Station’s remaining cooling towers have been demolished, three years after a deadly accident at the plant. Footage of the demolition shows the massive concrete structures collapsing in a cloud of dust. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Didcot A Power Station’s remaining cooling towers have been demolished, three years after a deadly accident at the plant. Footage of the demolition shows the massive concrete structures collapsing in a cloud of dust. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Why Hong Kong is protesting: Their five demands listed  CNNFlights resuming at Hong Kong airport after protest chaos  Fox NewsSecurity analyst calls Trump's language on Hong Kong protests 'inappropriate' | TheHill  The HillHong Kong protest today: Why are there riots in Hong Kong? What happened last night?  Express.co.ukIs it safe to travel to Hong Kong? Latest on flights and holiday advisories  The SunView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Fire broke out in Dhaka’s Mirpur district on Friday, destroying almost 2,000 tin shacks, officials sayAt least 10,000 people are homeless after a massive fire swept through a crowded slum in the Bangladesh capital and destroyed thousands of shanty homes, officials said on Sunday.The fire broke out at in Dhaka’s Mirpur neighbourhood late on Friday and razed around 2,000 mostly tin shacks, fire services official Ershad Hossain said. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    She put her film career on hold and let husband Will Smith become a megastar. Now Jada Pinkett Smith’s candid chat show is opening up truthful conversations around kitchen tables everywhereImagine the scene. You’re a middle-aged woman, sitting around the table with your husband, your mother and your teenage daughter. Your husband is saying how hard he tried to give you the best 40th birthday party ever, and you didn’t even appreciate it. Then you announce that you never wanted to get married in the first place because marriage is a trap, but your mother forced you into it because you were pregnant. Grandma responds that this is news to her, but agrees that your wedding was horrible. Your daughter is just staring at all of you and saying wow a lot.Well, you don’t actually have to imagine it, because this is a real conversation that Hollywood stars Jada Pinkett Smith and her husband Will Smith had at home in Calabasas, California, with their daughter Willow and Jada’s mother Adrienne. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    After 11 weeks of demonstrations, weary protesters fear only their ebbing stamina or Chinese troops will break the stalemateEllie Lau, a 21-year-old student, was one of thousands of protesters who flooded Hong Kong’s airport this week. There, she and a friend had an uneasy conversation about the future.As they joined throngs of demonstrators dressed in black sitting on the floor of the arrivals hall they talked about exhaustion and uncertainty – emotions they have suppressed over the past two months of protesting against their government. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    At nine in the morning on August 8, 2019, an explosion resonated across the cold waters of the arctic White Sea. A missile had exploded lifting off from an offshore research platform near Nyonoksa, Russia.Long-range missiles had been tested at a site adjacent to the rural town since 1965, and accidents were hardly unprecedented. In 2015, debris from an errant cruise missile rained onto a residential complex with a kindergarten on its ground floor, setting the building on fire but fortunately leaving residents unscathed.Tragically, the August 8 incident proved more lethal. Initially, media reported two testers died in the blast. But subsequent reports increased the number to three, then five, then seven.Indeed, as many as fifteen may have been harmed in the accident. Locals tweeted ominous imagery of a Russian military helicopter landing and depositing Chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear (CRBN) specialists in hazardous-material suits who evacuated injured personnel in stretchers. At least three testers were evacuated to the Moscow Federal Medical Biophysical Center, where two subsequently died from their injuries. Later, ten workers from a regional hospital involved in treating the injured were themselves reportedly flown to the Moscow center.A notice was issued to ships that they could not enter a 250-square kilometer area close to the accident. The Serebryanka—a nuclear fuel carrier likely modified to recover radioactive fragments from the ocean—remained in the area, having been present near the platform prior to the test.Not unrelatedly, twenty miles to the west, the major Russian shipyard city of Severodvinsk reported a spike in gamma radiation twenty times the norm around noon. Technically, this remained within safe limits, and by 4 p.m., radiation levels began to normalize.However, the radiation levels at Nyonoksa itself would surely have been of much higher—possibly releasing radionuclides into the atmosphere and drinking water that could increase cancer risk and cause other adverse health effects to those exposed.As reports of the accident circulated, Moscow claimed that it had been testing a “liquid fuel rocket.” Rosatom then stated it was working on an “isotope power source in a liquid propulsion system.”By then a consensus had emerged among Western experts that Russia had been testing a prototype Burevestnik nuclear-powered cruise missile, which is codenamed the SSC-X-9 “Skyfall” by NATO. The weapon was one of several developed to circumvent the United States’ GMD anti-ballistic missile system, which Russia worries may undermine its nuclear deterrence despite GMD’s limited capabilities.Putin had publicly unveiled the Burevestnik (which means “Petrel,” a type of seabird)—in a video showing a successful launch in April 1, 2018, alongside several other exotic new strategic nuclear delivery systems. Theoretically, a cruise missile propelled by a nuclear-powered ramjet could travel at supersonic speeds out to practically unlimited range, skimming close to the earth and maneuvering around obstacles to evade long-range radars and air defense missiles.However, Putin’s video didn’t show numerous failed tests, or that even the successful launch in November 2017 had gone to crash in the sea after flying only twenty miles. That means Burevestnik’s development is far from complete.A companion article on the Burevestnik details more on the missile’s underlying strategic rationale, technical concept, and testing history, as well as a likely explanation for the accident on August 8.Fallout from a Failed TestUltimately the dead included five elite scientists of the Russian Rosatom nuclear energy agency and two military personnel. A special memorial service was held at Sarov, a closed city that’s central to Russian nuclear research.Supposedly, the radiological event tied to the accident had been minor, and notices posted by regional officials were scrubbed from the internet. But locals were not convinced. In Severodvinsk and Arkhangelsk, demand for potassium iodide tablets, which reduce the thyroid gland’s intake of radioactive substances, skyrocketed and several pharmacies were sold out.Then, as if the Russian state were keen to reenact historical events dramatized in the HBO series Chernobyl, four days after radiation levels were declared to have returned to normal, officials told Nyonoksa’s approximately 450 residents they would be temporarily evacuated by train for a few hours as a “routine measure.”Given that locals insisted radiation levels really were normal, this may actually have been intended to conceal the personnel, equipment and debris involved in the clean-up. But as the alarming news resounded on the internet, the government backtracked and canceled the evacuation. Despite Moscow’s habitual obfuscation of the accident, internet social media made a coverup difficult to maintain.The deadly incident near Nyonoksa is merely the latest in a string of major military accidents in Russia including a titanic explosion at an ammunition dump on August 5 that injured six, a fire onboard the Losharik nuclear-powered spy submarine that killed fourteen, and the sinking of a huge floating drydock in Severodvinsk which nearly resulted in the loss of Russia’s only aircraft carrier. As Moscow forges ahead with tests of additional experimental weapons for a looming nuclear arms race tied to the axing of key arms-control treaties, the potential for more such accidents is real.Sébastien Roblin holds a master’s degree in conflict resolution from Georgetown University and served as a university instructor for the Peace Corps in China. He has also worked in education, editing, and refugee resettlement in France and the United States. He currently writes on security and military history for War Is Boring.Image: Wikimedia
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Turnout was massive for a rally that organisers said mobilised more than 1 million people in Hong Kong on Sunday despite warnings from Beijing. Police estimated there were 128,000 in the city's Victoria Park at the height of the protest.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Author: ReutersID: 1566110918248272100Sun, 2019-08-18 06:46 SRINAGAR: Indian authorities reimposed restrictions on movement in major parts of Kashmir’s biggest city, Srinagar, on Sunday after violent overnight clashes between residents and police in which dozens were injured, two senior officials and eyewitnesses said. In the past 24 hours, there has been a series of protests against New Delhi’s Aug. 5 revocation of the region’s autonomy. This followed an easing in curbs on movement on Saturday morning. The state government has said that it has not imposed a curfew over the past two weeks, but on Sunday people were being turned back at multiple roadblocks set up in the city in the past few hours. Security forces at some roadblocks have told residents there is a curfew. Two senior government officials told Reuters that at least two dozen people were admitted to hospitals with pellet injuries after violent clashes broke out in the old city on Saturday night. Representatives in the Jammu and Kashmir government in Srinagar and the federal government in New Delhi did not immediately return calls asking about the latest clampdown or seeking an assessment of the number of injuries and clashes. One of the official sources said that people pelted security forces with stones in around two dozen places across Srinagar. He said that the intensity of the stone pelting protests has increased over past few days. The heavy overnight clashes took place mostly in Rainawari, Nowhetta and Gojwara areas of the old city where Indian troops fired tear smoke, chilly grenades and pellets to disperse protesters, eyewitnesses and officials said. Chilly grenades contain very spicy chili pepper, and produce a major eye and skin irritant, as well as a pungent smell, when they are unleashed. The officials, who declined to be identified because they aren’t supposed to talk to the media, said clashes also took place in other parts of the city including Soura, a hotbed of protests in the past two weeks. A senior government official and hospital authorities at Srinagar’s main hospital said that at least 17 people came there with pellet injuries. They said 12 were discharged while five with grievous injuries were admitted. The hospital officials and a police officer told Reuters that a 65-year-old man, Mohammad Ayub of Braripora, was admitted to the hospital after he had major breathing difficulties when tear gas and chilly grenades were fired in old city area on Saturday afternoon. He died in the hospital on Saturday night and has already been buried, they said. Javed Ahmad, age 35 and from the wealthy Rajbagh area of Srinagar, was prevented from going to the old city early Sunday morning by paramilitary police at a barricade near the city center. “I had to visit my parents there. Troops had blocked the road with concertina wire. They asked me to go back as there was curfew in the area,” he said. Telephone landlines were restored in parts of the city on Saturday after a 12-day blackout and the state government said most telephone exchanges in the region would start working by Sunday evening. Internet and cell phones remain blocked in Kashmir. More than 500 political or community leaders and activists remained in detention, and some have been flown to prisons outside the state. For 30 years in the part of Kashmir that it controls, India has been fighting a revolt in which at least 50,000 people have been killed. Critics say the decision to revoke autonomy will cause further alienation and fuel the armed resistance. The change will allow non-residents to buy property in Jammu and Kashmir, and end the practice of reserving state government jobs for local residents. Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government has said the measure is necessary to integrate Kashmir fully into India and speed up its development. Main category: WorldTags: KashmirIndia Some curbs, including fixed phone use, eased in KashmirPakistan, India exchange cross-border fire after UN meet on Kashmir
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The UK could face a shortage of fresh food, fuel and medicine in the event of a no-deal Brexit, as bringing critical supplies into the country will be hit by logjams at EU ports and borders, a leaked government report predicts. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The UK could face a shortage of fresh food, fuel and medicine in the event of a no-deal Brexit, as bringing critical supplies into the country will be hit by logjams at EU ports and borders, a leaked government report predicts. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Moscow claims 26 foreign surveillance aircraft have been spotted by its forces near its airspace over the past seven days.​Russia says it scrambled a Sukhoi Su-27 Flanker fighter jet to intercept a US Navy P-8A Poseidon that was flying close to the annexed territory of Crimea.As the videos in this post show the Flanker pilot used his mobile phone to record footage of the latest close encounter between US and Russia aircraft.(This first appeared earlier in 2019 and is being republished due to reader interest.)The Su-27 pilot is seen holding his phone in a reflection as he films the P-8 flying above his Flanker and then pans down to show land and water below.Russia’s defense ministry said that the Poseidon changed course when it was intercepted by the Flanker.The US military has not yet commented on the claims.The Russian defense ministry said: “An Su-27 fighter jet as part of the Southern Military District’s air defenses was scrambled to intercept the target.“The crew flew the aircraft at a safe distance to the aerial target and identified it as a US P-8A Poseidon reconnaissance jet.”The statement added that the US plane “immediately changed the direction of its flight to fly away from the Russian state border”.Currently, US forces are participating in NATO’s Sea Breeze naval drills in the Black Sea.The Russian Navy has its own “combat training” exercises in the Black Sea, reported Moscow media.As reported by Mirror, the Russian military newspaper Red Star claims Kremlin warplanes have been scrambled three times in the past week “to block foreign aircraft from illegally entering Russian airspace”.Moscow claims 26 foreign surveillance aircraft have been spotted by its forces near its airspace over the past seven days.In mid-June, Su-27 fighter jets were scrambled to intercept U.S. Air Force (USAF) B-52strategic bombers approaching the Baltic and Black seas, claimed Moscow.Crimea is a disputed territory after Russia annexed the peninsula from Ukraine in 2014 during the crisis in the former Soviet republic.Russia’s control of Crimea, where its Black Sea Fleet is based, means it is able to control shipping flows through the Kerch Strait.In May last year, Putin opened a bridge between the Russian mainland and Crimea, tightening Moscow’s hold over the territory.Moscow has backed a pro-Russia insurgency in eastern Ukraine in an armed conflict that has killed thousands.The UK Foreign Office warns holidaymakers on its website: “Russian forces and pro-Russian groups have established full operational control in Crimea.“Following an illegal referendum on 16 March 2014, Russia illegally annexed Crimea on 21 March 2014 and tensions remain high.”Britain’s Foreign & Commonwealth Office currently advises against all travel to Crimea, in addition to Donetsk oblast and Luhansk oblast, where fighting between Ukrainian forces and Russian-backed separatists has raged since April 2014.This first appeared in Aviation Geek Club here. Image: Creative Commons.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Californian UFC star Nate Diaz made a winning return to the octagon after three years away as he defeated former lightweight champ Anthony Pettis, then called for a fight with Jorge Masvidal. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Author: AFPID: 1566107958008207700Sun, 2019-08-18 05:52 DHAKA: At least 10,000 people are homeless after a massive fire swept through a crowded slum in the Bangladesh capital and destroyed thousands of shanties, officials said Sunday. The fire broke out at in Dhaka’s Mirpur neighborhood late on Friday and razed around 2,000 mostly tin shacks, fire services official Ershad Hossain said. “I could not salvage a single thing. I don’t know what will I do,” 58-year-old Abdul Hamid, who ran a tea stall inside the slum, said as he broke down in tears. Authorities eventually got the blaze under control and no-one was killed, although several people had minor injuries, firefighters said. Many residents — largely low-income garment factory workers — were not in the slum as they had left their homes to celebrate the Muslim Eid Al-Adha holiday with their families. “Otherwise, the damage would have been bigger,” local police chief Golam Rabbani said. Around 10,000 people have taken refuge in crammed camps at nearby schools closed for the weeklong holiday, according to Hossain. “We are providing them with food, water, mobile toilets, and electricity supply,” municipal official Shafiul Azam said, adding that authorities were trying to find permanent accommodation. Some families have erected tarpaulins to shelter them from bouts of rain during the monsoon season, but the wet conditions have turned the fields muddy. Experts say fires are frequent in Dhaka due to lax safety measures. At least 100 people have been killed so far this year in building fires across the densely populated metropolitan city. In 2012, a fire swept through a nine-story garment factory near Dhaka killing 111 workers. An investigation found it was caused by sabotage and that managers at the plant had prevented victims from escaping. A 2010 fire in Nimtoli, one of the most densely populated districts of the capital, killed 123 people. Main category: WorldTags: DhakaBangladesh Bangladeshi slum kids work over 60 hours a week to make clothes — researchFire guts ancient part of Bangladesh’s capital, killing 81
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Germany’s economy is in trouble and the government is dithering over whether to provide support in the form of fiscal stimulus.The administration is under increasing pressure now that it’s clear the economy shrank in the second quarter and the recession risk is growing. But politicians are opting to wait, given that the downside forces are largely external and it’s not clear how deep the slump will be.“If the manufacturing sector is in free-fall because your main trading partners are duking it out in a trade war, then obviously there is nothing you can do,” said Claus Vistesen, chief eurozone economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics. “You can help to make sure that your domestic economy stays strong, but it’s not a clear story.”The government has run a budget surplus for the past five years and cut its debt burden to the lowest since before the financial crisis, giving it room to spend. The administration is ready to run a deficit should the economy collapse, Der Spiegel reported on Friday.If Chancellor Angela Merkel is willing to break some taboos though, she could really loosen the purse strings, with consequences beyond the nation’s borders.Controversy Without RewardUnless the economic situation becomes dire, the government has to play by its fiscal rules. Even if it scraps a commitment to keep the budget balanced, a constitutional debt brake limits the fiscal bang to 10 billion euros ($11 billion) at most, says Oliver Rakau at Oxford Economics.Suspending the law would allow the government to run a deficit of about 1.5% of gross domestic product before it violates European Union rules limiting public debt to 60% of GDP, according to ING economist Carsten Brzeski.In the PipelineFor the time being, Berlin’s plans are staying put. The draft budget approved earlier this week doesn’t foresee any new debt through at least 2021.At the same time, the government has already set aside more than 150 billion euros for infrastructure, education, housing and digital technology over the next four years. That provides Europe’s largest economy with a boost of 0.4% of GDP and should be enough for now, reckons Berenberg economist Florian Hense.“Obviously they have to be very careful as to how much external headwinds are spreading into the domestic economy,” Hense said. “If unemployment is picking up then we might have an issue.”Build BiggerWith its infrastructure in poor shape, Germany could think big and commit to higher investment for the next 15 to 20 years, according Christian Odendahl, chief economist at the Centre for European Reform in Berlin. Germany is ranked highly in the overall global competitiveness index, but falls short in areas like road quality and internet connectivity.Such investment programs take longer to implement, but can have a bigger impact. They’d also give companies a reason to buy machinery and expand their capacity at a time when Germany is trying to transform itself in areas such as clean technology.Tax CutsChristian Schulz, an economist at Citigroup, says Germany could follow the U.K.’s example of 2008 and temporarily cut its sales tax to give consumption a boost. That could act as a “circuit-breaker” to prevent a deeper downturn.Or it could reduce social-security contributions for the poor. Income tax cuts -- the typical prescription advice Germany gets -- would backfire, Odendahl says, by depriving local governments of their lifeblood for investment.Cash for ClunkersFor a car-loving nation, the government could revisit its 2009 program of rebates for replacing older cars with more fuel-efficient models. As well as aiding a key industry -- one whacked by a diesel scandal and trade tensions -- the initiative would dovetail with the country’s drive to accelerate the switch to more environmentally friendly energy sources.BlackoutThe government’s “black zero” -- or balanced budget -- looks at risk. The hurdle for more aggressive spending is high though, and likely to remain so.“There is a good chance that the black zero will be gone next year because growth assumptions for the budget are too optimistic,” said Schulz at Citigroup. “Probably there will be a stimulus, but I’m skeptical on large numbers.”To contact the reporter on this story: Piotr Skolimowski in Frankfurt at pskolimowski@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Paul Gordon at pgordon6@bloomberg.net, Fergal O'Brien, Jana RandowFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Author: ReutersID: 1566107364438171700Sun, 2019-08-18 05:11 HONG KONG: Hundreds of thousands of anti-government protesters rallied peacefully in Hong Kong on Sunday, filling major thoroughfares under torrential downpours in the eleventh week of what have been often violent demonstrations in the Asian financial hub. Sunday's turnout showed that the movement still has broad-based support despite the ugly scenes witnessed in recent days when protesters occupied the Chinese-ruled city's airport, a move for which some activists apologised. It was the calmest weekend protest since the latest demonstrations against perceived creeping Beijing influence in the former British colony began. "They’ve been telling everyone we're rioters. The march today is to show everyone we are not," said a 23-year-old named Chris, who works in marketing and was dressed all in black, including a scarf covering his face and baseball cap. "It does not mean we won’t keep fighting. We will do whatever is necessary to win, but today we take a break, then we reassess." One protester shouted at others who were jeering at police, "Today is a peaceful march! Don’t fall into the trap! The world is watching us," prompting the group to move on. Late in the evening, some demonstrators were urging others to go home and rest. Anger over a now-suspended bill that would allow criminal suspects in Hong Kong to be extradited to mainland China erupted in June, but the unrest has been fuelled by broader worries about the erosion of freedoms guaranteed under the "one country, two systems" formula put in place after Hong Kong's return to Chinese rule in 1997, including an independent judiciary and right to protest. SENSITIVE TIME FOR BEIJING The protests present one of the biggest challenges for Chinese President Xi Jinping since he came to power in 2012, with the ruling Communist Party preparing to mark the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic on Oct. 1. Protesters held aloft placards with slogans including "Free Hong Kong!" and "Democracy now!" and umbrellas to shield them from the sometimes heavy rain. Some aimed green lasers at police and government buildings. The crowd in Causeway Bay's leafy Victoria Park, where the rally started, included elderly people and young families, with some parents carrying toddlers. Despite rally organisers not having permission to march, the park could not accommodate the crowd, which thronged nearby streets. Many protesters headed towards the city's financial centre, chanting for the city's Beijing-backed leader, Carrie Lam, to step down. It was impossible to put an exact figure on the number of protesters. The organisers put the number at 1.7 million, adding they had applied for permission to march to the Hong Kong Liaison Office, Beijing's main representative body in the city, on the last day of the month. Police estimated there were 128,000 in Victoria Park at the height of the protest. "It's bloody hot and it's raining. It's a torture just to turn up, frankly. But we have to be here because we have no other choice," said a 24-year-old student named Jonathan. "We have to continue until the government finally shows us the respect that we deserve." A government spokesman said the protests were generally peaceful, but they had disrupted traffic badly. "The most important thing at present is to restore social order as soon as possible," he said. "When everything is calm, the government will engage in a sincere dialogue with the public to fix the social rifts and rebuild social harmony." Aside from Lam's resignation, demonstrators are seeking complete withdrawal of the extradition bill, a halt to descriptions of the protests as "rioting", a waiver of charges against those arrested, an independent inquiry and resumption of political reform. "WE WILL STILL FIGHT" "When we were young, we didn’t think about it. But my son tells me: After 2047, what will happen to me?," said a history teacher named Poon, referring to the year when the 50-year agreement enshrining Hong Kong's separate system will lapse. "I will come again and again and again. We do not know how any of this is going to end. We will still fight," she said. Police have come under criticism for using increasingly aggressive tactics to break up demonstrations and on Sunday some people handed out balloons resembling eyeballs, a reference to the injury suffered by a female medic hit by a pellet round in the eye. On Saturday, however, a demonstration in support of the government attracted what organisers said was 476,000 people, although police put the number of attendees at 108,000. Beijing has struck an increasingly strident tone over the protests, accusing foreign countries including the United States of fomenting unrest. Scenes of Chinese paramilitary troops training this past week at a stadium in the city of Shenzhen, which borders Hong Kong, gave a clear warning that mainland intervention by force is possible. Last week, protesters who occupied the terminal at Hong Kong's airport forced the cancellation of nearly 1,000 flights and detained two men they thought were pro-government sympathisers, prompting Beijing to liken the behaviour to terrorism. "We are Hong Kongers. We are here for our future. We feel for the teenagers," said Frances Chan, 60, a retired journalist attending Sunday's rally. She said only a few protesters had used violence, sparingly, brought on by pressure from the authorities. "Actually, we want peace and freedom," she said. Main category: WorldTags: Hong Kong Hong Kong tense as weekend of protests begins with teachers’ rally in rainHong Kong response ‘won’t repeat’ Tiananmen: China media
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The stories you may have missed this week.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The stories you may have missed this week.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Stipe Miocic defeated Daniel Cormier via TKO in their rematch to win back the heavyweight title at UFC 241.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Stipe Miocic stunned Daniel Cormer in their main event rematch at UFC 241 to recapture the UFC heavyweight title after a punishing encounter in Anaheim, California. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    More than 60 people were killed in a suicide bomb blast at a wedding in western Kabul late on Saturday. The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack in a propaganda statement on Sunday.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The tanker, now flying the Iranian flag, is preparing to depart the Mediterranean port, raising the question of what further action the United States may take.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    NASCAR paid back the first responders of the plane crash that Dale Earnhardt Jr. and his family survived with a night at the races.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    You must turn to a support group and confide in people you trust, Mariella Frostrup tells the mother of a young man struggling with addictionThe dilemma I’m 54, single, with two sons and am a carer to my parents. For 10 years my younger son, who is 26, has sporadically stolen from my father and me. Whenever he was caught, he was full of regret and would promise not to do it again. He has also smoked cannabis since the age of 17 and I’m sure he’s started taking pills. Things came to a head when he borrowed my car – I haven’t seen it since – and I discovered he’d stolen a ridiculous amount of money from my parents and me. I threatened him with an injunction and he left home. Since then he has come to the house twice. The first time he took my bank card and emptied my account. The second time he found my father’s card. I need to change the locks, but I have no money to do this. It’ll take months of extra shifts at work before I can make things right. I’ve only told my oldest friend – she said I need to call the police. I cannot bear the thought of telling my siblings and I would never ask them for money. I need to be seen as strong and capable of looking after our parents and I don’t want them to hate my son. Is there any way I can get through this without police involvement? I feel scared and vulnerable – every solution either involves having him arrested, or costs money that I simply do not have.Mariella replies My heart is broken for you. Addiction is as cruel as dementia when it comes to the degree of living loss we endure for a person we love. A drug addict’s whole emotional range is highjacked by a powerful, seductive force that obliterates any sense of loyalty, morality or duty to those who care for them. Your boy is at present as lost to you as my grandmother was to me in the final days of her untethered dementia. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    In this heat, it’s ice screamingly obvious what you need to doThe summer staggers on. The air is hot and thick as treacle. There is no breeze, not a single leaf moves. For some, the summer of their dreams. For me, the perfect excuse to make ice-cream. To be honest, there has barely been a day when there hasn’t been at least two tubs in the freezer. Homemade vanilla or raspberry ripple, perhaps one made with roast plums, another with basil and lemon. Some have been made here in my kitchen (crème fraîche, lemon, a less than perfect pistachio), others have been rushed home from the shops. There have been wafers and cornets, sundaes and ice-cream sandwiches, and more than I care to admit eaten straight from the tub.A little sugar brings out the sweetness of the apricots, the lemon makes them sing Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The London skyline dazzles at this rooftop restaurant, but from there the only way is downThe B&H Garden Room, Assembly Hotel, 31 Charing Cross Road, London WC2H 0LS (020 3962 7275). Starters £9-£12, mains £14-£32.50, desserts £8-£12, wines from £27The moment I’d paid the bill at the Bourne & Hollingsworth Garden Room atop the Assembly Hotel, I took the lift down 10 floors and lolloped up London’s Charing Cross Road in a blind, pigeon-toed fury. I went to the Ivy Club, the shiny members’ space above the theatreland restaurant of which it is a part. Yes, I’m a member. So shoot me. They mix a killer whiskey sour, there’s an impressive live jazz scene and they have a no-photography rule that means I can get drunk and slip off a bar stool like treacle spilling from its tin, and no one will have pictorial evidence. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Officers shot tear gas canisters into student accommodation and took 43 people into custody after reports on social mediaIndonesian authorities raided a university dormitory in Surabaya on Saturday and arrested dozens of West Papuan students after a standoff over allegations the Indonesian flag was thrown into a sewer.Officers broke down the gates of the Surabaya building and used teargas to clear the rooms, taking 43 people into custody on the Indonesian Independence Day weekend. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    An explosion. An abruptly-canceled village evacuation. Five dead nuclear experts. And a few traces of radioactive iodine in the air over the northern Norwegian coastline.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A 5.0-magnitude earthquake has jolted Taiwan some 31km (19 miles) southwest of Hualien, at a shallow depth of 10km, the US Geological Survey has reported. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    People around the world may be worried about nuclear tensions rising, but I think they’re missing the fact that a major cyberattack could be just as damaging – and hackers are already laying the groundwork.With the U.S. and Russia pulling out of a key nuclear weapons pact – and beginning to develop new nuclear weapons – plus Iran tensions and North Korea again test-launching missiles, the global threat to civilizationis high. Some fear a new nuclear arms race.That threat is serious – but another could be as serious, and is less visible to the public. So far, most of the well-known hacking incidents, even those with foreign government backing, have done little more than steal data. Unfortunately, there are signs that hackers have placed malicious software inside U.S. power and water systems, where it’s lying in wait, ready to be triggered. The U.S. military has also reportedly penetrated the computers that control Russian electrical systems.Many intrusions alreadyAs someone who studies cybersecurity and information warfare, I’m concerned that a cyberattack with widespread impact, an intrusion in one area that spreads to others or a combination of lots of smaller attacks, could cause significant damage, including mass injury and death rivaling the death toll of a nuclear weapon.Unlike a nuclear weapon, which would vaporize people within 100 feet and kill almost everyone within a half-mile, the death toll from most cyberattacks would be slower. People might die from a lack of food, power or gas for heat or from car crashes resulting from a corrupted traffic light system. This could happen over a wide area, resulting in mass injury and even deaths.This might sound alarmist, but look at what has been happening in recent years, in the U.S. and around the world.In early 2016, hackers took control of a U.S. treatment plant for drinking water, and changed the chemical mixture used to purify the water. If changes had been made – and gone unnoticed – this could have led to poisonings, an unusable water supply and a lack of water.In 2016 and 2017, hackers shut down major sections of the power grid in Ukraine. This attack was milder than it could have been, as no equipment was destroyed during it, despite the ability to do so. Officials think it was designed to send a message. In 2018, unknown cybercriminals gained access throughout the United Kingdom’s electricity system; in 2019 a similar incursion may have penetrated the U.S. grid.In August 2017, a Saudi Arabian petrochemical plant was hit by hackers who tried to blow up equipment by taking control of the same types of electronics used in industrial facilities of all kinds throughout the world. Just a few months later, hackers shut down monitoring systems for oil and gas pipelines across the U.S. This primarily caused logistical problems – but it showed how an insecure contractor’s systems could potentially cause problems for primary ones.The FBI has even warned that hackers are targeting nuclear facilities. A compromised nuclear facility could result in the discharge of radioactive material, chemicals or even possibly a reactor meltdown. A cyberattack could cause an event similar to the incident in Chernobyl. That explosion, caused by inadvertent error, resulted in 50 deaths and evacuation of 120,000 and has left parts of the region uninhabitable for thousands of years into the future.Mutual assured destructionMy concern is not intended to downplay the devastating and immediate effects of a nuclear attack. Rather, it’s to point out that some of the international protections against nuclear conflicts don’t exist for cyberattacks. For instance, the idea of “mutual assured destruction” suggests that no country should launch a nuclear weapon at another nuclear-armed nation: The launch would likely be detected, and the target nation would launch its own weapons in response, destroying both nations.Cyberattackers have fewer inhibitions. For one thing, it’s much easier to disguise the source of a digital incursion than it is to hide where a missile blasted off from. Further, cyberwarfare can start small, targeting even a single phone or laptop. Larger attacks might target businesses, such as banks or hotels, or a government agency. But those aren’t enough to escalate a conflict to the nuclear scale.Nuclear grade cyberattacksThere are three basic scenarios for how a nuclear grade cyberattack might develop. It could start modestly, with one country’s intelligence service stealing, deleting or compromising another nation’s military data. Successive rounds of retaliation could expand the scope of the attacks and the severity of the damage to civilian life.In another situation, a nation or a terrorist organization could unleash a massively destructive cyberattack – targeting several electricity utilities, water treatment facilities or industrial plants at once, or in combination with each other to compound the damage.Perhaps the most concerning possibility, though, is that it might happen by mistake. On several occasions, human and mechanical errors very nearly destroyed the world during the Cold War; something analogous could happen in the software and hardware of the digital realm.A cyberattack wouldn’t be launched from a nuclear operator’s console, like the one shown here from the decommissioned Oscar Zero site, but rather through cyberspace. A human might not even be required. Jeremy StraubDefending against disasterJust as there is no way to completely protect against a nuclear attack, there are only ways to make devastating cyberattacks less likely.The first is that governments, businesses and regular people need to secure their systems to prevent outside intruders from finding their way in, and then exploiting their connections and access to dive deeper.Critical systems, like those at public utilities, transportation companies and firms that use hazardous chemicals, need to be much more secure. One analysis found that only about one-fifth of companies that use computers to control industrial machinery in the U.S. even monitor their equipment to detect potential attacks – and that in 40% of the attacks they did catch, the intruder had been accessing the system for more than a year. Another survey found that nearly three-quarters of energy companies had experienced some sort of network intrusion in the previous ...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Islam Times- The decision by the United States Justice Department to issue a warrant for the seizure of the Iranian oil tanker, Adrian Daria, (formerly Grace 1), has created fresh uncertainty about the fate of the vessel.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Author: Associated PressID: 1566101965247967300Sun, 2019-08-18 04:04 KABUL: The suicide bomber stood in the middle of the dancing, clapping crowd as hundreds of Afghan children and adults celebrated a wedding in a joyous release from Kabul’s strain of war. Then, in a flash, he detonated his explosives-filled vest, killing dozens — and Afghanistan grieved again. The local Daesh affiliate claimed responsibility for the deadliest attack in the capital this year, with 63 killed and 182 wounded, while outraged Afghans questioned just how safe they will be under an approaching deal between the United States and the Taliban to end America’s longest war. Stunned families buried the dead, some digging with their bare hands. One wounded survivor, Mohammad Aslim, still wore his bloodied clothes the day after the blast late Saturday. He and his friends had already buried 16 bodies, among them several close relatives, including a 7-year-old boy. Aslim looked exhausted, and said he was waiting to bury more. Nearby a man named Amanullah, who lost his 14-year-old son, said in anguish that the explosion had mangled the boy’s face so badly he could no longer recognize it. “I wish I could find the pieces of my son’s body and put them as one piece into the grave,” he cried. The emergence of the Daesh affiliate in recent years might be the greatest threat to Afghan civilians as the US and the Taliban seek an agreement to end nearly 18 years of fighting. While the US wants Taliban assurances that Afghanistan will no longer be used as a launch pad for global terror attacks, there appear to be no guarantees of protection for Afghan civilians. The Taliban, which the US hopes will help curb the Daesh affiliate’s rise, condemned Saturday’s attack as “forbidden and unjustifiable.” The blast took place in a western Kabul neighborhood that is home to many in the country’s minority Shiite Hazara community. Daesh, which declared war on Afghanistan’s Shiites nearly two years ago and has claimed responsibility for many attacks targeting them in the past, said in a statement that a Pakistani Daesh fighter seeking martyrdom targeted a large Shiite gathering. The wedding, at which more than 1,200 people had been invited, was in fact a mixed crowd of Shiites and Sunnis, said the event hall’s owner, Hussain Ali. Ali’s workers were still finding body parts, including hands, in the shattered wedding hall, its floor strewn with broken glass, pieces of furniture and victims’ shoes. “We have informed the police to come and collect them,” he said. The bomber detonated his explosives near the stage where musicians were playing and “all the youths, children and all the people who were there were killed,” said Gul Mohammad, another witness. Survivors described a panicked scene in the suddenly darkened hall as people screamed and scrambled to find loved ones. “I was with the groom in the other room when we heard the blast and then I couldn’t find anyone,” said Ahmad Omid, who said the groom was his father’s cousin. “Everyone was lying all around the hall.” The blast at the wedding hall, known as Dubai City, shattered a period of relative calm in Kabul. On Aug. 7, a Taliban car bomber aimed at Afghan security forces detonated his explosives on the same road, a short drive from the hall, killing 14 people and wounding 145 — most of them women, children and other civilians. Kabul’s huge, brightly lit wedding halls are centers of community life in a city weary of decades of war, with thousands of dollars often spent on a single evening. Messages of shock poured in on Sunday. “Such acts are beyond condemnation,” the European Union mission to Afghanistan said. “An act of extreme depravity,” US Ambassador John Bass said. A deliberate attack on civilians “can only be described as a cowardly act of terror,” UN envoy to Afghanistan Tadamichi Yamamoto said. Saudi Arabia’s foreign ministry on Sunday condemned and denounced the suicide bombing. An official source affirmed the Kingdom’s firm stance against targeting and intimidating innocent people, terrorism and all manifestations of violence and extremism. The Kingdom expressed condolences to the families of the victims and the government and people of Afghanistan, wishing the injured a speedy recovery. The explosion came just ahead of Afghanistan’s 100th Independence Day on Monday. The city, long familiar with checkpoints and razor wire, has been under heavier security. It was not immediately clear if planned events in Kabul would go ahead. The attack also comes at a greatly uncertain time in Afghanistan as the US and the Taliban appear to be within days of a deal on ending the war after several rounds of talks this year. Afghanistan’s government has been sidelined in those talks as the Taliban refuse to negotiate with what it calls a US puppet. Top issues in the talks have included a US troop withdrawal and Taliban guarantees they would not allow Afghanistan to become a launching pad for global terror attacks. In that, the Daesh affiliate’s increasingly threatening presence is the top US concern. Other issues include a cease-fire and intra-Afghan negotiations on the country’s future. Many Afghans fear that terror attacks inside the country will continue, and their pleas for peace — and for details on the talks — have increased in recent days. Few appear to believe that the Taliban will step in to protect civilians from Daesh or anyone else after years of killing civilians themselves. “Taliban cannot absolve themselves of blame, for they provide platform for terrorists,” President Ashraf Ghani said on Twitter, declaring a day of mourning and calling the attack “inhumane.’ Frustration at the authorities was evident as well amid a fresh wave of grief. “We want the government to stop arguing about power and act like a human being to bring peace to this country,” one worker at the wedding hall, Hajji Reza, said. Several of his colleagues remained missing.   Main category: WorldTags: kabul attackDaeshAfghanistan 14 dead in Taliban attack on Kabul police centerTwo dead in Kabul terror attack as presidential election campaign begins
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The deputy prime minister’s comments about the Pacific were both insulting and wrongAustralia’s diplomatic performance throughout the Pacific Islands Forum has evoked a colonial arrogance that many hoped was in the past. While Pacific Island states raised understandable concerns about the climate emergency and rising sea levels, Australia’s response was to insist on the removal of references to coal from the official communique.The deputy PM, Michael McCormack, who was left in charge of the government while Morrison was busy dismissing our neighbours’ concerns in Tuvalu, continued the insults at home. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Drivers asked to check for any images of hitchhikers near Hamilton where the Australian tourist’s body was foundNew Zealand authorities are asking drivers to check their dashcam for footage of any hitchhikers near where the Australian surfer Sean McKinnon was killed in the middle of the night while his Canadian fiancee ran for her life.A man has faced court charged over the 33-year-old’s shooting murder at Raglan – a popular North Island surf spot – on Friday. Continue reading...
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The best images from the 2019 Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Islam Times - US President Donald Trump will drop out of the race for the 2020 presidential election and will not seek re-election, a former top aide says.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Islam Times - Iran’s ambassador to the UK has rejected claims that Tehran renamed a tanker planned to depart from the British overseas territory of Gibraltar, where it has been detained since last month, to avoid US sanctions, saying the move was in line with international maritime rules.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    An explosion during a missile test on Russia’s White Sea on August 8 that killed seven nuclear scientists and caused radiation levels to briefly spike in the region has drawn new attention to Moscow’s development of exotic new weapons designed to deliver long-range strategic nuclear strikes.As reports of the accident circulated, Moscow claimed that it had been testing a “liquid fuel rocket.” Rosatom, the state nuclear energy agency, then stated it was working on an “isotope power source in a liquid propulsion system.”Convincing evidence has led to a consensus among foreign experts that missile being tested was likely a 9M730 Burevestnik (“Petrel,” a seabird)—a prototype of a nuclear-powered cruise missile. Such a missile—if it can be made to work—would be powered by a very small nuclear reactor, allowing it to fly practically unlimited distances at very high speeds.Burevestnik’s existence is no secret. In March 1 2018, Putin revealed as one of six new weapons under development by Russia—also including hypersonic missiles and intercontinental-range nuclear drone torpedoes.While a companion piece details the fallout from the deadly testing accident, this piece will seek to answer a simple question: why on earth is Russia seeking to develop such a peculiar and complicated weapon in the first place?Cruise Missiles to Fly Under an Anti-Ballistic Missile ShieldQuite simply, the pursuit of unconventional weapons like the Burevestnik stems from Russian fears that America’s new anti-ballistic missile systems put Moscow’s nuclear deterrence at risk. Intercontinental ballistic missiles fly extremely high and fast—but they are also highly visible to sensors and generally fly in a predictable trajectory. Using advanced sensors, the United States can potentially detect and shoot down a small number of ICBMs with the few dozen interceptors it has deployed. That’s far too few interceptors to stop Moscow’s hundreds of ballistic missiles, but Moscow is paranoid American defense will continue to improve.Unlike ballistic missiles, cruise missiles skim close to surface, allowing them to hug terrain and maneuver around obstacles. These characteristics mean ground-based radars may only have a detection angle on cruise missiles when they’re only a few dozen miles away. While defenses do exist that can potentially shootdown cruise missiles, the short detection range and interception windows would mean that it wouldn’t be practical to create a huge defensive umbrellas like those provided by anti-ballistic systems.However, most cruise missiles simply can’t pack enough fuel to fly thousands of miles on intercontinental attacks—and usually can’t sustain speeds much faster than an airliner when traveling longer distances. A nuclear-powered cruise missile could—theoretically—have practically unlimited range, and sustain supersonic speeds, making it hard to intercept, and allowing it to circumnavigate bubbles of radar coverages and leverage terrain to minimize the chance of interception.The Russian claim that a “liquid-fuel” booster was being tested may not in fact be inaccurate. The most likely scheme for a nuclear-powered missile involves a ramjet engine, in which the reactor would heat onrushing air at speeds exceeding twice the speed of sound. This expanding heated air would be squeezed out the engine’s rear nozzle, resulting in sustainable supersonic propulsion.However, conventional booster would be required for the missile to move fast enough for the ramjet to work. Therefore, The Drive’s Joe Trevithick argues it’s possible scientists were testing the robustness of the missile’s reactor when exposed to the heat and physical stress caused by the rocket boosters—with explosive results.Another issue is that the Burevestnik’s unshielded reactor core could potentially leave behind a trail of radioactive emissions and contaminants over everything it overflies. In fact, in the early 1960s, the United States’ Project Pluto developed a nuclear ramjet-powered missile that was canceled in part due to concerns over its extreme radioactive pollution—though not before its designers considered whether its extreme radioactive emissions could be weaponized! The problem remained that the trail of sickness-inducing radiation would begin over friendly territory.Failed TestsWestern intelligence had already been keeping tabs on Skyfall prior to Putin’s speech. Around a dozen tests have been held since 2016, first at Kapustin Yar (near Volgograd), then the Pan’kovo test site on Yuzhny island. Only two were successful. However, Pentagon snooping of the latter by WC-135 weather reconnaissance planes used to measure radiation may have led to the program’s relocation to Nyonoksa, which is distant from international airspace.In the most successful test in November 2017, which can be seen in a video released by Putin, the Skyfall missile flew little more than twenty miles before crashing into the sea. The nuclear refueling ship Serebryanka, which was also present at the accident in August 8, was dispatched to recover the possibly irradiated debris. These results suggest the program is far from mature. Thus, Pranay Vaddi argues in a piece on Lawfare that Burevestnik should not have any impact on renewal of the New START Treaty regulating deployed strategic nuclear weapons, as it is unlikely to enter service in the next decade.Clearly, Russia is still far from solving the daunting challenges of developing a practical and functional nuclear-powered missile. Even if the Skyfall is eventually developed into an operational system, deploying dozens of strategic missiles each with their own miniature nuclear reactors would be extremely expensive and pose costly political, safety and security risks—as was amply demonstrated by the tragic incident on August 8.Sébastien Roblin holds a master’s degree in conflict resolution from Georgetown University and served as a university instructor for the Peace Corps in China. He has also worked in education, editing, and refugee resettlement in France and the United States. He currently writes on security and military history for War Is Boring.Image: Flickr
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Police have arrested 13 people on a range of charges, including disorderly conduct, resisting arrest and unlawful use of a weapon, after right-wing demonstrators squared off with Antifa counter-protesters in Portland, Oregon. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Police have arrested 13 people on a range of charges, including disorderly conduct, resisting arrest and unlawful use of a weapon, after right-wing demonstrators squared off with Antifa counter-protesters in Portland, Oregon. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Islam Times - Helicopters and jets operated by the Israeli regime have launched fresh attacks on the besieged Gaza Strip, less than a day after warplanes targeted facilities allegedly belonging to the Palestinian resistance movement Hamas.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Islam Times - The US military has been forced to comply with Iraqi demands to halt flying planes, helicopters and drones over the country after its prime minister warned that violating aircraft would be targeted by Iraq’s air defense systems.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Islam Times - The leader of Yemen’s Houthi Ansarullah movement has lauded a drone attack by Yemeni army forces and fighters from allied Popular Committees against the Shaybah oil field in eastern Saudi Arabia, saying the assault was the biggest of its kind in retaliation for the Riyadh regime's deadly military campaign against its southern neighbor.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    ASHFORD, ENGLAND - JULY 02: Trucks queue on the M20 as part of Operation Stack on July 2, 2015 in Ashford, England. Operation Stack is in place for the fourth consecutive day due to industrial action in Calais with the M20 closed coastbound from junctions 8 to 11 and from 9 to 8 London-bound. (Photo by Rob Stothard/Getty Images)
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Police in Portland, Oregon arrested at least 13 people on Saturday as a right-wing group marched to a downtown waterfront park and anti-fascist counterprotesters scuffled with officers who tried to keep the two sides apart.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    NASA rockets including the V-2 rocket and Saturn I rocket are seen at Marshall Space Flight Center
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Republican Rep. Steve King clashed with constituents as he defended several of his controversial comments on abortion and immigration during a Saturday town hall in his hometown of Storm Lake, Iowa.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The man who police say is seen on video dropping off rice cookers Friday in Manhattan was arrested and charged Saturday, according to an New York Police Department news release.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A Welsh town will install anti-sex toilets that spray users with water  FOX 31 DenverA Welsh seaside town plans to install public toilets with measures to prevent people having sex inside - including a squealing alarm, doors that shoot open and ...View full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson came under pressure Sunday to immediately recall lawmakers from their summer holiday so parliament can debate Brexit. More than 100 MPs have written to Johnson to urge him to reconvene and let them sit permanently until October 31 -- the date Britain is due to leave the European Union. "Our country is on the brink of an economic crisis, as we career towards a no-deal Brexit," said the letter, signed by MPs and opposition party leaders who want to halt Britain's departure from the EU.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The technology uses an algorithm including data from a patient's blood pressure, heart rate and numerous other factors
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    White House moving forward with plan to cancel foreign aid, teeing up fight with Congress  CNNAppropriators warn White House against clawing back foreign aid | TheHill  The HillView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A customer opened fire reportedly because his sandwich was not prepared quickly enough.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Diageo's investment in alcohol-free spirit maker Seedlip shows how big firms want to reach non-drinkers.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The Isis fighter known as Jihadi Jack has been stripped of his British citizenship, prompting a diplomatic row between the UK and Canada, it has been reported.  Muslim convert Jack Letts, 24, who had held dual UK and Canadian citizenship, declared he was an "enemy of Britain" after travelling from Oxfordshire to Syria at the age of 18 to join the terror group. He has begged to be allowed to return to the UK, insisting he had "no intention" of killing Britons, after he was captured by Kurdish forces in 2017.  The Home Office has now stripped Letts of British citizenship, meaning he is the responsibility of the Canadian government, The Mail on Sunday said. It was reportedly one of the last actions of Theresa May’s administration. Isil Rise and fall of a caliphate The decision is understood to have angered officials in Ottawa, prompting fears of a row between Canadian PM Justin Trudeau and Boris Johnson when they meet at the G7 summit in France next weekend. Letts, who travelled to the Middle East in 2014, is now among more than 120 dual nationals who have been stripped of their British citizenship since 2016, including Isis bride Shamima Begum. Ms Begum was one of three girls from Bethnal Green, east London, who left the UK aged just 15 in February 2015 and travelled to Syria to join Islamic State. It was thought Ms Begum may have a claim in Bangladesh because of her family background, something Bangladeshi officials denied. The move can only be made against people with two passports, because international law prevents the Government from making anyone "stateless".  John Letts and Sally Lane, the parents of a Muslim convert dubbed Jihadi Jack Credit: PA It will come as a blow to Lett's parents, Sally Lane and John Letts, who were found guilty at the Old Bailey in June of funding terrorism and given 12-month sentences suspended for 15 months. In an interview after their conviction, they said: "Jack is still a British citizen and we have pleaded with the Government to help us to bring him to safety, even if that meant that he might be prosecuted in the UK." A Home Office spokesman said: "This power is one way we can counter the terrorist threat posed by some of the most dangerous individuals and keep our country safe." In an interview with ITV earlier this year, Letts said he felt British and that he wanted to return to the UK, but admitted he did not think that would be likely. "I'm not going to say I'm innocent. I'm not innocent. I deserve what comes to me. But I just want it to be... appropriate... not just haphazard, freestyle punishment in Syria," he told the broadcaster. Struggling with obsessive compulsive disorder and Tourette's when he was at school, Jack converted to Islam at the age of 16. He used to attend the Bengali mosque in Cowley Road, Oxford, before he came into contact with men with a more radical ideology. Jack has previously admitted he was at one time prepared to carry out a suicide attack, telling the BBC: "I used to want to at one point, believe it or not. Not a vest. I wanted to do it in a car. I said if there's a chance, I will do it." He also said in the interview, which took place in October last year but was not broadcast until after his parents' trial had ended, that he realised he had been "an enemy of Britain" but added that he had made "a big mistake".
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Will the big polluters clean up their acts if the people who actually own them say they must?
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Will the big polluters clean up their acts if the people who actually own them say they must?
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The rapper is set to win the Video Vanguard Award at the MTV VMAs next month.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The rapper is set to win the Video Vanguard Award at the MTV VMAs next month.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A heavy police presence kept members of the Proud Boys and other far-right groups separated from far-left activists at a downtown park Saturday.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    After McDonald's says its paper straws cannot be recycled, what other items only go in general waste?
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Dani Rotstein arrived in Majorca knowing nothing of its hidden Jewish past. Now he's helping reinvigorate its Jewish community.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Dani Rotstein arrived in Majorca knowing nothing of its hidden Jewish past. Now he's helping reinvigorate its Jewish community.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The legal team of Jeffrey Epstein said they disagree with the medical examiner’s ruling that their client hanged himself. Promising their own investigation into his death, they have demanded CCTV footage from his prison cell. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    The legal team of Jeffrey Epstein said they disagree with the medical examiner’s ruling that their client hanged himself. Promising their own investigation into his death, they have demanded CCTV footage from his prison cell. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    First things first: The theme song of the week is the Boy Meets World closing credits.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Prime Minister Boris Johnson will tell French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel that the Westminster parliament cannot stop Brexit and a new deal must be agreed if Britain is to avoid leaving the EU without one.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Andrew Harper on his wedding day. Pic: Mark Lord Photography
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A plaque placed on Sunday commemorates Okjokull glacier, which was officially declared dead in 2014.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Far-right protest group held march in one of the United States' most liberal cities.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Modern censorship is more dangerous than open totalitarianism, it being concealed and incorporated in our daily routine, says Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Zizek, commenting on the insider leak detailing Google’s news blacklist. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Writer Bébhinn Ramsay finds solace on Ireland's pilgrim paths after the death of her husband.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Writer Bébhinn Ramsay finds solace on Ireland's pilgrim paths after the death of her husband.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Footage has emerged of several violent attacks by Antifa on right-wing demonstrators in Portland, Oregon. The clashes come as President Donald Trump threatened to designate the left-wing movement as an “organization of terror.” Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Footage has emerged of several violent attacks by Antifa on right-wing demonstrators in Portland, Oregon. The clashes come as President Donald Trump threatened to designate the left-wing movement as an “organization of terror.” Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Are celebrity smiles driving more adults to wear braces in a bid to straighten their teeth?
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Ex-service personnel, who may otherwise be left homeless, will live on the site for up to two years.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Adam Riches rediscovered a love for drawing and has turned doodling into an art career.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Family of PC killed on duty pay tribute  The TimesPC Andrew Harper: Killed officer 'died of multiple injuries'  BBC NewsFundraiser for PC killed in Berkshire raises £90,000 within hours  The Guardian‘Murdered’ PC Andrew Harper was ‘dragged to death by getaway van of burglars who stole quad bike from £800k co  The Sun‘Murdered’ police officer Andrew Harper's heroic act of bravery on holiday  Mirror.co.ukView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Middle East Explained: What now for the Saudi-UAE alliance in Yemen?  The IndependentSaudi Oil Plant Attacked by Drones But Production Unaffected  BloombergIran-Aligned Houthis Strike Major Saudi Oil Field  The Wall Street JournalDrone attack by Yemen rebels sparks fire in Saudi oil field  Al Jazeera EnglishDrone attack: Iran-linked rebels bomb Saudi oil fields ‘Global threat’  Express.co.ukView full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A Phoenix woman's complaint says a "cuddling" session with a massage therapist turned sexual.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    A Phoenix woman's complaint says a "cuddling" session with a massage therapist turned sexual.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Carol Anderson was scanning Twitter recently when she saw something that brought back a chilling memory.
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Kyle Williams was a five-star linebacker who seemed destined for greatness. But after viciously assaulting three women, prison has been his reality.       
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Many of the adults polled worry children feel unsafe in their neighbourhood because of knife crime
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
    Amy Klobuchar zings President: Unlike Trump, 'Greenland is not for sale’  New York Daily NewsSen. Amy Klobuchar might have had the best zinger, mocking the president for his quixotic plan and his propensity for self-promotion and self-dealing.View full coverage on Google News
  • Sunday 18 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    More than 1,000 guests attended ceremony, witness says
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Istanbul floods: Grand Bazaar flooded by heavy rains today  CBS NewsAt least 1 dead in Turkey flood  CBS NewsView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    China and North Korea will boost military cooperation and work together to assure security in the Asia Pacific, a high-ranking Chinese commander has said. Both Beijing and Pyongyang view US activities in the region as a threat. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Veteran full-back Maxime Medard scored twice as France hammered Scotland 32-3 in their first Rugby World Cup warm-up Test.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Police say a Gainesville, Florida, mom of two young boys told a friend she was going to kill herself and her sons by crashing her car with everyone inside.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    New York City's chief medical examiner determined on Friday that suicide by hanging was the cause of death for financier Jeffrey Epstein, whose body was found six days ago in a Manhattan jail cell while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Marium, The Dugong Who Charmed Thailand, Dies After Ingesting Plastic  NPRThis baby sea mammal captured people’s hearts. She just died from eating plastic.  The Washington PostThailand's beloved lost baby dugong dies with plastic in stomach, vets say  Fox NewsA baby dugong that became a Thai internet star died with plastic waste in its stomach  CNNView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Parliament cannot stop Brexit, Johnson to tell Macron and Merkel  ReutersBrexit news: PM to tour capitals and warn leaders to back down or risk 'historic mistake'  Express.co.ukViolent protests expected across UK and Ireland on Brexit Day - police begin preparations  ExpressRevealed: Leading Brexiteers' 'huge error' immediately after the EU referendum result  ExpressView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Firefighters in California have mostly contained two of the wildfires threatening parts of Northern California this week, according to Cal Fire.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Images from a wedding hall showed wrecked tables and scattered bodies.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Author: Sat, 2019-08-17 23:41 ISLAMABAD: Pakistan Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi warned that India might resort to a “false flag operation” to divert attention from Jammu and Kashmir following a UN Security Council meeting on Friday to discuss the issue. “To divert international attention, most probably India will resort to some false flag operation. We want to tell the international community that we have doubts about India’s intentions. We know their plans and the nation is ready for it,” he said. In a letter to the Security Council on Aug. 13, Qureshi asked for an urgent meeting on Jammu and Kashmir after its special autonomous status was revoked by India. Indian-administered Kashmir has remained under lockdown, with phone and internet services suspended since the decision on Aug. 5. Following the Security Council meeting Qureshi addressed a joint press conference with Pakistan army spokesman Maj. Gen. Asif Ghafoor, who said that Islamabad was ready to “defend any misadventures on the part of India.” Pakistan’s Foreign Office had formed a special committee to discuss future action on the issue, Qureshi said. Kashmir desks will be established at various Pakistani embassies around the world “in order to carry out effective communication on the matter,” he said. “The committee on Kashmir has members from all concerned parties, including members of opposition parties.”  Qureshi praised the Security Council’s call to all parties to refrain from action that could aggravate the situation. “We achieved a milestone yesterday, which shocked India. The Kashmir issue was raised at a platform which is responsible for resolving the dispute,” he said. The foreign minister commended the “indomitable and unbroken spirit” of residents in Indian-administered Kashmir, saying that despite the curfew Kashmiris came out of their houses on Friday to offer special prayers. “It was a glimpse into their emotions, into what it will be like after the curfew lifts,” he said. Qureshi said that world bodies have responded positively to Pakistan’s call to discuss the issue. “The Organization of Islamic Cooperation has called for an immediate end to the curfew,” he said. Discussing India’s move to revoke Article 370 of the constitution, Qureshi said: “Pakistan does not recognize Article 370 of the Indian constitution, it is not our concern. Our concern is with the forceful change in Kashmir’s demographic and violation of the rights of the people of Kashmir.” Meanwhile, Ghafoor said that the Pakistan army will respond to any act of aggression by India. “Pakistan is a responsible state, but India has always threatened us. We are planning how to manage the threats from India,” he said. “At present, the biggest issue in Jammu and Kashmir is human rights violations. The entire region has been turned into a prison,” Ghafoor said. A former Pakistani ambassador to India, Abdul Basit, backed the foreign minister’s covert operation claim, saying that amid growing international pressure a staged terrorist attack by India could be used to divert attention from Jammu and Kashmir. He said any direct attack on Pakistan by India would be a huge mistake. “They (India) might have worked out their strategies, but when the situation is so tense, it would not be wise to open another front. The situation will be clearer after the curfew is lifted, but I don’t see direct conflict anytime soon.” Basit urged Pakistan to arrange an OIC foreign ministers summit in Islamabad as quickly as possible. “Along with the summit, Pakistan should also hold a convention of Kashmiri diaspora in London or somewhere that can come up with a resolution. Pakistan should also deploy a special envoy on Kashmir,” he said. Main category: WorldTags: IndiaKashmirShah Mahmood QureshiSrinagar UNSC session on Kashmir a huge development: QureshiIndia easing restrictions in Kashmir as international pressure mounts
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    ‘Jihadi Jack’ has told Sky News he regrets what he did and feels guilty for what he put his parents through
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Attempted murder charges were filed Saturday against a Philadelphia man accused of shooting six police officers during an hours-long standoff, according to court records.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Italy's hard-line interior minister buckled under pressure Saturday and agreed to let 27 unaccompanied minors leave a migrant rescue ship after two weeks at sea, temporarily easing a political standoff that has threatened the viability of the populist government. In recent days, Premier Giuseppe Conte had written to Interior Minister Matteo Salvini demanding that minors be allowed off the boat. After initially refusing, Salvini wrote back Saturday with a three-page missive of his own saying he would do so but made clear it was Conte's choice and that it didn't set a precedent.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Without an adequate peace accord, one lawmaker said, “we will witness more horror.” 
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Richard Williams, the animator known for his work on "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" and two "Pink Panther" films, is dead, his family told PA Media, the UK national news agency.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A 17-year-old in India has become the oldest known female in the world diagnosed with a rare condition called “Fetus in fetu.”       
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Senegalese Jacques Diouf who headed the UN food agency for 18 years has died at the age of 81, President Macky Sall said on Saturday, describing him "as one of Senegal's most valiant sons". Diouf, a former Senegalese ambassador to the United Nations, died in France following a long illness, his family said quoted by Senegal media. "Senegal has lost one of its most valiant sons with the death of our compatriot Jacques Diouf," Sall said on Twitter.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Sudan's pro-democracy movement and ruling military council signed a final power-sharing agreement Saturday at a ceremony in the capital, Khartoum, after weeks of tortuous negotiations. The historic deal paves the way for a transition to a civilian-led government after the military overthrow of President Omar al-Bashir months ago and the more recent deadly suppression of protests. Earlier this month, the two sides initialed a constitutional document in the wake of international pressure and amid growing concerns that the political crisis that followed al-Bashir's ouster could ignite civil war.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Scientists in New Zealand found fossilized bones from an extinct monster penguin that was about the size of an adult human and swam the oceans.       
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    At least 63 people have been killed after a powerful blast rocked a wedding reception in the western part of Afghanistan’s capital, Kabul. Nearly two hundred people have been injured. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The move came hours after Gibraltar ordered the ship’s release and risks fresh tensions between Tehran and Washington.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    North Korea said Saturday that leader Kim Jong Un supervised another test-firing of an unspecified new weapon, seen as an attempt to pressure Washington and Seoul over slow nuclear negotiations and their joint military exercises. Pyongyang's Korean Central News Agency, or KCNA, said that following Friday's launches, Kim expressed "great satisfaction" over his military's "mysterious and amazing success rates" in recent testing activity and vowed to build up "invincible military capabilities no one dare provoke." The report did not mention any specific comment about the United States or South Korea.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Measles has killed 2,758 people in the DR Congo since January, more than the Ebola epidemic in a year, medical NGO Doctors Without Borders said, and called Saturday for a “massive mobilisation of funds.”
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A two-person team of detectives watched the mayor around the clock for six days
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The interior minister backs down reluctantly over the migrant minors amid a row within his cabinet.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Ballon d'Or winner Luka Modric was shown a straight red card for the first time in his career, after a VAR decision adjudged the Croatian to have ran afoul of new La Liga rules governing tackles to the achilles tendon. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Military: 3 rockets fired from Gaza toward Israel  ABC NewsThe Israeli military says three rockets have been fired from the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip into southern Israel. Israeli aerial defense batteries intercepted two ...View full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    In the weeks following the mass shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio, Florida has seen a fair share of mass shooting threats — from Walmarts to schools.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Author: Sat, 2019-08-17 21:24 SRINAGAR: Indian authorities eased restrictions on movement and restored landline telephone links in some parts of Kashmir on Saturday, the biggest relaxation in a crippling lockdown since New Delhi announced it was removing the region’s special status on Aug. 5. The moves came even as there were celebrations and protests by Kashmiris opposed to the Indian policy in Srinagar on Friday night. The celebrations were to mark the first UN Security Council meeting about the Kashmir issue for about five decades. Two police officials and a series of eyewitnesses said that demonstrations and celebrations took place in various parts of the city. However, the number of incidents of local residents pelting security forces with stones were low compared with recent days, said a security official who toured Srinagar in the morning. A witness said that hundreds marched in the Rajouri Kadal area of Srinagar and they also let off some fire crackers. They shouted pro-Pakistani and anti-India slogans during the celebrations, two witnesses said. For the first time since the Indian government announced that it was revoking Jammu and Kashmir state’s rights to set some of its own laws, police vans didn’t announce imposition of a virtual curfew in Srinagar. The authorities deny there has been a curfew in the past two weeks but on many occasions people have been ordered to stay indoors. India’s UN Ambassador Syed Akbaruddin said the decision over Kashmir’s status was an internal matter and that the country was committed to ensuring the situation remained “calm and peaceful.” The Jammu and Kashmir government said that restrictions had been lifted by 35 of the 100 or so police stations across the Kashmir Valley, though it was not immediately clear what this meant. It said that most of the telephone exchanges for fixed-line phones will be working by Sunday night. In the Jammu area, which is mainly Hindu, mobile services have been restored in some districts. Despite the relaxation, the situation is still far from normal in Kashmir. There is still a lockdown in much of the region, including in some parts of Srinagar and in sensitive major towns. There is also no clear indication about when internet and cellphone links will be restored across the region. Meanwhile, more than 500 political or community leaders and activists remain in detention, some of them having been flown to prisons outside the state. Some private vehicles were out on major roads in Srinagar on Saturday but the city’s old quarter, long a centre for protests, was deserted, witnesses said. Shops, even grocery stores, remained closed in that area. The landlines have been restored in some wealthier areas of Srinagar, and in a district near the airport. Main category: WorldTags: KashmirSrinagarIndiaUnited Nations Pakistan, India exchange cross-border fire after UN meet on KashmirIndia easing restrictions in Kashmir as international pressure mounts
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Gerald Ford said this headline cost him the election. Daily News used it again for Trump.  The Washington Post"Fjord to Trump: Drop dead" is a play on a headline from when then-President Gerald Ford refused to bail New York City out of bankruptcy in 1975.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    As Woodstock turns 50, we remember the legendary festival in photos.       
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    2 die in knife attack at German train station  ABC NewsGerman police say a man and a woman were fatally stabbed at a crowded train station in the town of Iserlohn in what was described as an "act of relationship ...View full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    It's about three years to the day since Nate Diaz last appeared in the UFC's octagon but, despite his prolonged hiatus, the controversial Californian still holds all the cards when it comes to the biggest fights in the 170lb fold. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Zinedine Zidane's second coming at Real Madrid proved the Frenchman is no miracle worker.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE Undated family handout photo courtesy of Maciee Stanford, the aunt of missing six-year-old Lucas Dobson who slipped into the River Stour in Sandwich, Kent, on Saturday afternoon, while on a fishing trip with family members. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday August 18, 2019. See PA story POLICE River. Photo credit should read: Family Handout/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous i
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Author: Zaynab KhojjiID: 1566063149783330500Sat, 2019-08-17 20:30 JAKARTA: Dozens of former terrorists took part in ceremonies to mark Indonesia’s 74th anniversary of independence as the country raised its red-and-white national flag and celebrated its vast diversity. In the nation’s capital, President Joko Widodo presided over a flag-hoisting ceremony at the presidential palace with Vice President Jusuf Kalla, former presidents and vice presidents, Cabinet ministers and foreign ambassadors among the guests. Many wore traditional costumes representing Indonesia’s various ethnic groups. The annual ceremony is marked by reading out the proclamation text at 10 a.m., the same time when Indonesia’s first president, Soekarno, read the original text to proclaim independence in Jakarta more than seven decades ago. Jakarta Gov. Anies Baswedan presided over a similar ceremony with thousands of civil servants in attendance on an artificial islet off the northern coast of Jakarta. The islet, which is the result of a disputed mega-reclamation project in Jakarta Bay, is now called Maju Beach. “We are having the ceremony in this particular area because this is an area that did not exist when we declared our independence,” Anies said during the ceremony. “We want to convey a message to everyone that this is not private land, but a land that belongs to the Republic of Indonesia. This is our land and we want to make sure that the red-and-white flag is hoisted on this land.” Dozens of former militants held a flag-raising ceremony in Tenggulun village in East Java, hosted by Yayasan Lingkar Perdamaian, the Peace Circle Foundation established by Ali Fauzi, the younger brother of Ali Ghufron and Amrozi, the two leading perpetrators executed for the 2002 Bali bombing that killed 202 people. Amrozi’s son, Zulia Mahendra, and Khairul Mustain, the son of another man convicted of the Bali bombing, also took part as flag raisers. “The ceremony this year included the former militants’ wives, children and their extended families. There were about 225 who took part, standing in the formation in front of the flagpole,” Ali told Arab News. Some former terrorists and their families refused to take part in the ceremony, which included saluting the flag and singing the national anthem, he said. “But I understand their objection. We cannot force them because this is about ideology. It takes time and I am sure with the right approach they will eventually be willing to do that,” he said. An oath of loyalty to the republic was read aloud by Hamim Tohari, who was also convicted over the Bali attacks. “Some of the women who wear the face veil also attended the ceremony,” Ali said. “This is also to show them that the Indonesian government guarantees their freedom to wear what they want in accordance with their faith, and also to show to the public that women who wear face veils should not be singled out as terrorists.” Main category: WorldTags: IndonesiaIndependence day How Indonesians celebrate Independence DaySaudi Arabia investments growing in Indonesia
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Flat-Earther ‘Mad’ Mike Hughes plans to strap himself to a homemade rocket and launch himself towards space on Saturday, in a bid to prove that our planet isn’t a globe. Here’s what to expect from the mad-cap experiment. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Like Jeffrey Epstein’s accusers, justice has been elusive for women allegedly abused by his modeling agent friend  The Washington PostEpstein's closest ally accused of raping and drugging underage girls  Washington ExaminerModels Say Jeffrey Epstein's Closest Pal Drugged, Raped Them  The Daily BeastJean-Luc Brunel: three former models say they were sexually assaulted by Jeffrey Epstein friend  The GuardianThree former models say they were sexually assaulted by Jeffrey Epstein's friend Jean-Luc Brunel  Daily MailView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Portland, Oregon, is bracing itself for a major right-wing rally – an event previously marred by clashes with anti-fascists. Warning any would-be violent counter-protesters, Donald Trump said events will be “watched very closely.” Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Portland, Oregon, is bracing itself for a major right-wing rally – an event previously marred by clashes with anti-fascists. Warning any would-be violent counter-protesters, Donald Trump said events will be “watched very closely.” Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Idlib airstrikes target IDP camp  Al Jazeera EnglishCivilian death toll mounts as Syrian offensive widens  Reuters UKUnborn baby is among 14 people killed in 'Russian air strike' in northern Syria  Daily MailAir raids on Syria's Idlib kill family of seven, say activists  Al Jazeera EnglishFrance calls for immediate end to fighting in Syrian city of Idlib  ReutersView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Drones launched by Yemen's Houthi rebels attacked a massive oil and gas field deep inside Saudi Arabia's sprawling desert on Saturday, causing what the kingdom described as a "limited fire" in the second such recent attack on its crucial energy industry. The attack on the Shaybah oil field, which produces some 1 million barrels of crude oil a day near the kingdom's border with the United Arab Emirates, again shows the reach of the Houthis' drone program. Shaybah sits some 1,200 kilometers (750 miles) from Houthi-controlled territory, underscoring the rebels' ability to now strike at both nations, which are mired in Yemen's yearslong war.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Women in Mexico City demand action after sexual assault allegations involving police officers.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Before he died of suicide by hanging, The New York Times reports Epstein used his wealth to try and manipulate his circumstances in federal custody.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Afghans voice fears that the U.S. is undercutting them in deal with the Taliban  The Washington PostIs Donald Trump in a rush to withdraw from Afghanistan?  Al Jazeera EnglishIt Matters If Americans Call Afghanistan a Defeat  The AtlanticAmerica is close to ‘deal’ with Taliban, hints Trump  The GuardianTaliban say killing of leader's brother will not derail U.S. talks  ReutersView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Government and Russian airstrikes pounded the southern edge of a rebel stronghold in Syria's northwest on Saturday, killing at least seven members of one family, activists and a war monitor reported. The intense airstrikes were coupled with fierce ground clashes as the government, backed by Russia, pushed ahead with a months-old offensive seeking to chip away at territory on the periphery of the rebel enclave. Idlib and surrounding areas are home to 3 million civilians and is dominated by Islamist insurgents.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Migrant families are suing the government for millions of dollars after their children were allegedly hurt or molested while in federal care.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Senior officials address accusations of heavy-handedness and the rumours of Chinese intervention.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Thirteen arrested as groups swarm downtown area
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Sudan just got a step closer to full democracy. Big obstacles remain  CNNSudan opposition names five civilian members of sovereign council  Aljazeera.comDeposed Sudan president to face corruption charges in court  The GuardianSudan’s military, civilians sign power-sharing deal, setting up elections in 2022  The Washington Post'New Sudan': Thousands celebrate as protesters, army sign deal  Al Jazeera EnglishView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Workers at a new Shell plant in Pennsylvania were told they had to attend a speech by President Donald Trump in order to get paid.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Minsk-based photographer Tatsiana Tkachova was in Volozhin, Belarus in 2017 when she saw an elegant woman in a bright dress. So began her friendship with Vera, now 92. Tkachova took 27 portraits for Vera’s Seasons, telling Vera’s story and that of the region. The last portrait is of the dress Vera will wear at her funeral Continue reading...
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Italy’s far-right Interior Minister Matteo Salvini on Saturday reluctantly authorised 27 migrant children rescued at sea to disembark from a charity vessel anchored in limbo off Lampedusa island for days.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Trudeau, in Trouble in Much of Canada, Still Has Fans in Quebec  The New York TimesJustin Trudeau's government goes ka-boom  Al Jazeera EnglishA Watchdog Found Trudeau Broke the Law, but Not Everyone Agrees  The New York TimesTrudeau, Once the Bright New Hope, Enters Campaign Tarnished by Scandal  The New York TimesView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    (Bloomberg) -- European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker is set to undergo emergency surgery to have his gallbladder removed.The EU leader was vacationing in Austria when he was taken back to Luxembourg for the operation, the EU said in a statement on Saturday. Juncker, 64, is set to leave his post when his term ends this fall. The former prime minister of Luxembourg has previously faced questions about his health. At a North Atlantic Treaty Organization Summit last year, Juncker was filmed struggling to keep his balance, which the commission later said was the result of a painful sciatica attack.Gallbladder removal surgery is a common procedure, according to the U.K.’s NHS website, which says an operation to take it out is often recommended if any problems with it develop. While such procedures are uncomplicated, it can sometimes take weeks before people return to normal activities.Juncker is scheduled to attend the Group of Seven summit in Biarritz, France, next weekend, though the emergency procedure means the EU chief may not be in a position to participate. The leaders are expected to discuss global challenges in the economy and the environment as well as relations with Iran, Russia and North Korea.The gallbladder surgery comes as the EU leader is set to hand over the presidency of the European Commission to Ursula von der Leyen in October. Following her confirmation by the European Parliament last month, the former German defense minister is accepting nominations from EU member states for the team of senior officials who will be in charge of the bloc’s executive body for the next five years.The commission has in recent years had to grapple with complex challenges, including difficult negotiations with the U.K. as it plans to leave the bloc as well as simmering tensions with the U.S. over trade.(Updates with more background from fourth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Natalia Drozdiak in Brussels at ndrozdiak1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Chad Thomas, James AmottFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The shipping agent for an Iranian supertanker caught in a diplomatic standoff says the vessel is ready to depart Gibraltar on Sunday or Monday, as the U.S. made a last-minute effort to seize it again. The head of the company sorting paperwork and procuring for the Grace 1 oil tanker in the British overseas territory said the vessel could be sailing away in the next "24 to 48 hours," once new crews dispatched to the territory take over command of the ship. "The vessel is ongoing some logistical changes and requirements that have delayed the departure," Astralship managing director Richard De la Rosa told The Associated Press.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The shipping agent for an Iranian supertanker caught in a diplomatic standoff says the vessel is ready to depart Gibraltar on Sunday or Monday, as the U.S. made a last-minute effort to seize it again. The head of the company sorting paperwork and procuring for the Grace 1 oil tanker in the British overseas territory said the vessel could be sailing away in the next "24 to 48 hours," once new crews dispatched to the territory take over command of the ship. "The vessel is ongoing some logistical changes and requirements that have delayed the departure," Astralship managing director Richard De la Rosa told The Associated Press.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Japanese star Naomi Osaka's participation in this month's US Open has been called into question after the defending champion suffered an injury to her left knee which forced her to retire from her Cincinnati WTA quarter-final. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Widespread efforts to silence speech deemed to be offensive threaten US constitutional rights, Democratic presidential hopeful Tulsi Gabbard says. Her latest campaign ad takes aim at the hot-button issue of political correctness. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Widespread efforts to silence speech deemed to be offensive threaten US constitutional rights, Democratic presidential hopeful Tulsi Gabbard says. Her latest campaign ad takes aim at the hot-button issue of political correctness. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Americans are bombarded with non-stop news on Hong Kong and Moscow rallies, but how come mass protests in Honduras and Brazil aren’t high on the agenda? Lee Camp looks at why the US corporate media are keeping mum on the subject. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Rapturous crowds filled the streets of Khartoum Saturday as Sudan’s generals and protest leaders signed a historic deal paving the way to civilian rule.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The agreement follows nine months of massive street protests that recalled the Arab Spring.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Five people were taken to the hospital Friday night after malfunctioning roller coaster failed to stop in Ocean City, Maryland.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Iranian tanker set to leave Gibraltar despite US warrant to seize vessel  Fox NewsUS issues warrant to seize Iranian tanker in Gibraltar  New York Post U.S. seeking to seize Iranian tanker detained in Gibraltar  NBC NewsU.S. seeks seizure of Iranian oil tanker in new escalation  The Washington PostUS makes last-ditch attempt to stop Iranian supertanker setting sail  CNNView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Strong rains in Istanbul on Saturday flooded several neighbourhoods, as well as the Grand Bazaar, while officials said one person was found dead in the city. Rain started early in the day in parts of Istanbul and picked up pace around noon. Footage from parts of the Grand Bazaar showed shopkeepers, ankle-deep in water, clearing the water out of their stores and the halls.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A YouTube diver brought closure to a family with a chance discovery
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Communists turn out for protest in Moscow  The Washington PostCommunists Rally in Moscow as Opposition Takes Weekend Off  BloombergView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Demonstrations against the striking of candidates from the city ballot have been held for six Saturdays in a row.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    With Pickets, Russian Protesters Look to Sustain Momentum  The New York TimesRussian opposition activists picket for free elections  ReutersRecording reveals the Russian Sully told air traffic control to buzz off after his emergency landing  Daily MailSeeking democracy on the streets of Russia  The Washington PostPilot Who Crash-Landed Plane Says He's No Hero, Gets Top State Honours  NDTV NewsView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Looming over the demonstrations were questions about whether the movement could be sustained past the Sept. 8 elections, and what comes after President Vladimir Putin’s term.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Public bathrooms being used for sordid activities have become such a problem in the Welsh town of Porthcawl that authorities are investing in anti-sex toilets that sound alarms and spray water when occupants try to get busy. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Public bathrooms being used for sordid activities have become such a problem in the Welsh town of Porthcawl that authorities are investing in anti-sex toilets that sound alarms and spray water when occupants try to get busy. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Kim Jong Un Expresses 'Great Satisfaction' Over Multiple North Korean Weapons Tests  TIMENorth Korea, China generals meet in Beijing  Washington TimesNorth Korea shuts down peace talks with South Korea  CBS NewsNorth Korea’s Missile Tests Fail to Provoke Response From Washington  The Wall Street JournalNorth Korea's Kim Jong-un expresses 'great satisfaction' after test of 'new weapon'  The GuardianView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Law protecting seals has side-effect of also attracting growing numbers of predators
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    An extension will renew an agreement set to lapse on Aug. 19, continuing Huawei's ability to maintain its telecommunications networks.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    UN convenes CITES summit to tackle threat of mass extinction
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A last-minute US warrant to seize an Iranian oil tanker preparing to leave Gibraltar after weeks of detention cast doubt over its departure on Saturday, prolonging a diplomatic spat between Tehran, London and Washington. The US Justice Department alleged the ship was part of a scheme "to unlawfully access the US financial system to support illicit shipments to Syria from Iran by the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps," which Washington has designated a foreign terrorist organisation. There was no comment from Britain or Gibraltar, its overseas territory.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The former MI6 agent credited with launching Russiagate concocted dangerous lies and myths that made a mockery of the US justice system and misled the American people, former Donald Trump campaign adviser Carter Page has told RT. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The former MI6 agent credited with launching Russiagate concocted dangerous lies and myths that made a mockery of the US justice system and misled the American people, former Donald Trump campaign adviser Carter Page has told RT. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Court rejects Planned Parenthood bid to freeze Trump's family planning rule  POLITICOMexico begins busing migrants to southern border as they await asylum trials  New York Post Court blocks Trump plan to halt asylum applications at Mexico border  The IndependentPlanned Parenthood faces critical decision after abortion-referral restriction upheld  CNNFederal appeals court allows Trump administration's abortion-referral ban to continue  New York Post View full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A man blamed by New York City police for leaving two kitchen appliances resembling pressure cookers in a subway station, causing chaos for commuters during Friday morning's rush hour, has been apprehended, authorities said on Saturday.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Rep. Rashida Tlaib's grandmother in West Bank still hopes for a visit  NBC News'May God ruin Trump', Tlaib's grandmother says  ReutersTrump Says Tlaib’s Grandmother “Real Winner” of Nixed Trip: “She Doesn’t Have to See Her Now!”  SlateLetters to the Editor: The visitors Israel rejected  Los Angeles TimesMatthew Brodsky: Tlaib, Omar don’t deserve sympathy for being barred from Israel – They deserve condemnation  Fox NewsView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Phone services are slowly being reinstated, but internet and mobile phone services remain suspended.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Donald Trump has increased spending on America’s arsenal while ripping up cold war treaties. Russia and China are following suitImagine the uproar if the entire populations of York, Portsmouth or Swindon were suddenly exposed to three times the permissible level of penetrating gamma radiation, or what the nuclear physicist Ernest Rutherford termed gamma rays. The outpouring of rage and fear would be heard across the world.That’s what happened to the roughly 200,000 people who live in the similarly sized northern Russian city of Severodvinsk on 8 August, after an explosion at a nearby top-secret missile testing range. Russia’s weather service, Rosgidromet, recorded radiation levels up to 16 times higher than the usual ambient rate. Continue reading...
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    ‘An era of limits’ for the Colorado River: Mandatory cuts in water deliveries will take effect in 2020, reducing supplies for Arizona, Nevada, Mexico.       
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A throng of left-wing activists gathered in the heart of Moscow, demanding fair elections and social justice. The rally took place on the heels of massive opposition protests that have been hitting the city for three weekends. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A throng of left-wing activists gathered in the heart of Moscow, demanding fair elections and social justice. The rally took place on the heels of massive opposition protests that have been hitting the city for three weekends. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The United States has unsealed a warrant for the seizure of an Iranian oil tanker anchored off the coast of Gibraltar. It is the latest twist involving the vessel at the center of a standoff between Tehran and the West.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    After being overlooked in last year's race for the Ballon d'Or, Lionel Messi may have to make some room in his trophy cabinet after an online leak suggested he is in pole position to be named UEFA Men's Player of the Year. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The Royal Theater in Madrid has offered its backing to renowned tenor Placido Domingo, confirming that an upcoming performance will go ahead and saying that allegations of sexual harassment against the singer must be proven. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The comedian describes how he was caught up in ‘extraordinary’ scenes at Hong Kong airport as protesters’ anger boiled overWhen I first landed in Hong Kong for a family holiday a few nights before the clashes with police, we were greeted in the arrivals hall by a large and vocal crowd of protesters, chanting and handing out leaflets.When we returned to the airport to depart a few days later, there was a marked change. The protesters had swelled from a few hundred to several thousand and there was now a very tense atmosphere. In front of the abandoned check-in desks, a crowd had gathered around a man who was allegedly a police officer posing as a protester. He was, by all accounts, being roughed up and had been cable-tied to a luggage trolley. Continue reading...
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The much-anticipated UFC lightweight title showdown between champion Khabib Nurmagomedov and Dustin Poirier in Abu Dhabi on September 7 will be available to Russian audiences free of charge on the state 'First Channel.' Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Nine people were injured after a fireworks display went horribly awry during a holiday celebration in southern France. Footage of the accident captured the moment when the malfunctioning pyrotechnics rained down on onlookers. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    “The photos were by no means meant to take away from the extremely serious nature of the incident,” city officials say.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Envoys gathered in Geneva Saturday for a meeting of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). A UN report released in May warned that 1 million species are now at risk of extinction due to human activities.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Envoys gathered in Geneva Saturday for a meeting of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). A UN report released in May warned that 1 million species are now at risk of extinction due to human activities.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints wants to make clear that vaping, green tea and fancy coffee drinks are off limits under the religion's dietary code, which is meant to keep members from consuming unhealthy substances.Mormon leaders pointed to an article in its youth magazine New Era which reminded readers that the Word of Wisdom prohibits “hot drinks”, understood to mean tea and coffee, and harmful or habit-forming substances.E-cigarettes are highly addictive, “iced tea is still tea” and any drink ending in “-ccino” probably has coffee and breaks the rules, the church wrote.Recreational marijuana is also banned but medical marijuana and opioids are fine when used as prescribed by a doctor.The Christian sect - widely known as the Mormon church \- had previously said it approved of medical marijuana in certain circumstances, but last year it opposed a medical marijuana bill in Utah that it said went too far.Experts and church members said the clarifications raised as many questions as they answered.For example, there is still confusion over why is iced tea off limits if it's cold, what the church's stance on coffee-flavoured desserts is and whether drinks with green-tea extract are allowed. Lauren Lethbridge is a student newspaper editor at Brigham Young University, which is sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. For her, following the Word of Wisdom is about obedience to the church.She said several of her friends drink juices with green-tea extract. Many of them feel fine about the extract but one friend vowed to throw out her drinks immediately.“I think people are still concerned and a little stressed about 'does this qualify?' or 'is this bad?' ” said Ms Lethbridge. “But I think less people are having it be a major concern for them.”The Word of Wisdom is a section of the Doctrine and Covenants, one of the church's four volumes of scripture. Mormons believe God revealed the foods and substances that are good and bad for people to consume in 1833. Liquor, tobacco, tea and coffee were prohibited.Heber Grant, a church president, decided in the 20th century to drill down on the rules and to make adherence a prerequisite for entering a Mormon temple, said Gregory Prince, a historian of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.Beer and wine were initially acceptable, while liquor was not. Eventually all alcohol became off limits.Church members in recent years have debated whether soda, which typically has caffeine, is prohibited.After prominent church member and then-Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney attracted attention in 2012 for drinking Diet Coke on the campaign trail, the church clarified that it has no rule against caffeine itself.Mormon has dance off with Michael Jackson impersonator - London LivThe church tends to issue clarifications when it gets a lot of questions about the same substance or when it realises members in different locations are not on the same page, Mr Prince said.He said church members also vary in how closely they follow the Word of Wisdom, which he called “a living document".Adhering to the dietary rules signals to others that someone is a church member, Mr Prince said. He said the practice is similar to how Jews might keep kosher as a way of demonstrating their faith.“That this is how we self-identify within our tribe,” he said. “This is your outward living of your inward religion.”Jana Riess, author of The Next Mormons, said there is a generational gap: older Mormons are more likely to be dogmatic about the Word of Wisdom.Independent Minds Events: get involved in the news aA study Ms Riess conducted found 40 per cent of millennial or Generation X church members said they had consumed caffeinated coffee in the past six months. Thirty-eight percent of members with permission to enter the temples said they had consumed at least one of the forbidden substances.Despite the continuous debate about interpretation, Ms Riess said the Word of Wisdom is not supposed to be a list of commandments with defined borders. She cited a quote from church founder Joseph Smith that she said was meant to guide members' dietary choices: “I teach them correct principles, and they govern themselves.”“People really want to know what the rules are, where the boundaries are, how far is too far,” Ms Riess said. “I feel sorry for the leaders of the church in trying to respond to this because I think that they would much rather have members understand that they have good principles and can govern themselves.”The Washington Post
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Climate change and warming rivers may have caused the mass death of salmon in parts of Alaska, scientists say.Large numbers of salmon died prematurely in some Alaskan rivers in July according to local reports, and scientists believe the cause could be the unprecedented heatwave that gripped the state last month.“Climate change is here in Alaska. We are seeing it. We are feeling it. And our salmon are dying because of it,” said Stephanie Quinn-Davidson, a biologist specialising in salmon and the director of the Yukon Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, in a Facebook post.> 200 miles of river. Dead chum consistently along entire stretch. None had spawned. 850 counted, many more missed. Likely ruled out mining, disease/parasites. All signs point to heat stress. Sad to see. Hoping this is not the new normal. climatechange salmon yukonriver alaska pic.twitter.com/zAHWSgy3pg> > — Steph Quinn-Davidson (@SalmonStephAK) > > July 29, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    'We're seeing not just stressful temperatures for salmon, but lethal temperatures,' experts say
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    As the driving force against President Omar al-Bashir's rule, they continue to fight for their rights and freedoms
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Did Russia’s nuclear-powered cruise missile just blow up? Or was it something else that spewed a radioactive cloud and triggered radiation alarms?  An accident at a military test site in northern Russia has sparked speculation of a mishap with the 9M730 Burevestnik ("Petrel"), an intercontinental cruise missile powered by a nuclear reactor.  Russia has confirmed an explosion during an August 8 test at Nyonoksa, a military testing base on the White Sea. The explosion killed employees of Rosatom, Russia’s state-owned nuclear energy corporation. “Five Rosatom staff members died and a further three people were injured in a tragic accident that took place during tests on a liquid propulsion system involving isotopes at a military facility in Arkhangelsk region,” stated a brief Rosatom announcement.   After Russian media reports that radiation in the area had spiked to 200 times normal background levels, Russian news agency TASS hastened to claim that the dose was less than that of a medical X-ray—though the village near the explosion has been ordered to evacuate, raising memories of the Chernobyl incident.  The fact that the accident involved rocket propulsion and radioactive isotopes immediately led to speculation that the Burevestnik (NATO code name SSC-X-9 Skyfall) was involved. In fact, President Donald Trump went on Twitter to announce that “we have similar, though more advanced, technology. The Russian ‘Skyfall’ explosion has people worried about the air around the facility, and far beyond. Not good!”  But Edward Geist, an expert on Russian nuclear history at the RAND Corp. think tank, cautioned that it is premature to assume that the Petrel was the culprit.  “The case that this may be associated with the nuclear cruise missile is pretty circumstantial,” Geist told The National Interest. For example, the site of the accident is a closed Russian military town that is “associated with the testing of all kinds of missiles.”   Perhaps there was an accident involving Petrel. Or, perhaps there was an accident involving another weapon that damaged a Petrel. Or, maybe Russia was testing some other system: among Putin’s much-touted wonder weapons is the nuclear-powered Poseidon robotic torpedo.  In other words, something happened, and that something involved fatalities and release of radiation. But we can’t be sure, and the Russian government isn’t likely to tell us.  Nonetheless, Geist suspects that Russia is expanding on Cold War-era Soviet research into nuclear aircraft propulsion. During that era, both the U.S. and the Soviet Union explored nuclear-powered manned aircraft. They also explored nuclear-powered missiles, such as the notorious 1950s U.S. Project Pluto, a nuclear-powered, low-altitude, supersonic ramjet missile that would have dropped atomic bombs over the Soviet Union—and poisoned the Russian countryside with radioactive exhaust from its reactor.   While the United States abandoned those projects by the 1960s, Soviet research continued into the 1970s, according to Guest. It is more than possible that Petrel is based on those old nuclear ramjet designs.  The problem isn’t with nuclear power per se. NASA uses Radioisotope Power Systems—fueled by plutonium—for its spacecraft exploring Mars, Saturn, Pluto and the Voyager probes that have journeyed beyond our solar system. Operating so far from the Sun, solar power isn’t an option. Despite some public fears about launching a plutonium device through the atmosphere aboard a rocket, the system has so far worked safely.  But these spacecraft spend almost all of their lives far, far from Earth. Not only are there technical challenges to powering a missile or aircraft with a nuclear reactor (especially if the aircraft is manned), but the Petrel will fly inside the atmosphere.  Nor is it clear why Russia needs a nuclear-powered cruise missile in the first place. Russia claims that because such a weapon has unlimited range, it can evade U.S. missile defenses designed to stop ballistic missiles descending from space rather than low-flying cruise missiles. Yet even if the Petrel was hard to detect and intercept, it would be too slow as a first-strike weapon.   It would be more useful as a retaliatory weapon. But as always with the nuclear Balance of Terror, it would be simpler to just build more ICBMs, armed with multiple warheads, to overwhelm anti-missile defenses. An ICBM can also reach its target within 30 minutes, compared to a cruise missile that would take hours.   Unlike an ICBM, a nuclear-powered cruise missile could potentially stay aloft indefinitely. But over whose territory would the radiation-spewing missile orbit? For how long? And why would anyone want a nuclear missile orbiting over their heads 24/7?  Michael Peck is a contributing writer for the National Interest. He can be found on Twitter and Facebook.Image: Reuters
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    (Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.Argentina is teetering on the edge of an economic abyss while its neighbor Chile is watching its glaciers melt at an alarming rate, and China is massing its troops on the border with Hong Kong.Dive into these and other stories that chronicle the week’s major political events with the latest edition of Weekend Reads. What Life at Center of Chaos Looks Like for Argentine BusinessesAfter two sovereign defaults this century, small business owners in Argentina are well versed in navigating times of crisis. But even they were left floundering by the latest rout. With presidential elections still 10 weeks away, they were left wondering how much worse it can get. Jonathan Gilbert, Jorgelina do Rosario and Patrick Gillespie report.Macron’s Quiet Summer May Turn to Anger as Voters Return to WorkPresident Emmanuel Macron has spent three weeks in the Cote d’Azur, south of France, alternating between the beach and preparing for a delicate G-7 summit on Aug. 24. While Macron himself doesn’t face voters until 2022, Gregory Viscusi reports any turbulence would be an unwelcome backdrop for local elections that are essential for developing his three-year-old party.Xi’s Dilemma: Send Forces Into Hong Kong, or Wait Out ProtestersThere’s signs China is preparing to mobilize mainland forces to quell the weeks-long uprising in Hong Kong. The question now is whether President Xi Jinping will actually do it. The protesters, meanwhile, have raised the stakes with actions to inflict economic pain as they push for leader Carrie Lam’s resignation and other demands to loosen Beijing’s grip on the city.Hong Kong’s Massive Protests Raise Ominous Questions About 2047When the U.K. agreed to return Hong Kong to China, “One country, two systems,” was shorthand for Beijing’s pledge to maintain the city’s character for 50 years — and the possibility that by the time 2047 rolled around, the systems would have converged. But as Matthew Campbell reports, that’s now unlikely.It’s Democracy vs. the Hackers as the 2020 Election ApproachesThe front line to protect the integrity of the U.S. presidential election is in a Springfield strip mall, next to a Chuck E. Cheese’s restaurant. As Kartikay Mehrotra and Alyza Sebenius report, it’s there that a couple dozen bureaucrats, programmers, and security experts are working to prevent a replay of 2016, when Russian hackers breached voter registration rolls.Protests Pop Up Across Russia as Putin’s Popularity, Economy DipYevgeny Dubinin had never been to a demonstration before. But he was so angry authorities had refused to register opposition candidates in Moscow’s city council election that he couldn’t sit at home. The protest-arrest cycle represents the biggest public challenge to Vladimir Putin’s two-decade rule since in 2012, Irina Reznik and Ilya Arkhipov write..Where America Flirted With Its Own ChernobylThe Three Mile Island accident four decades ago turned the U.S. against nuclear energy. Now the complex is closing just as some say it still has a role to play, writes Will Wade. Today, nuclear energy is at the center of a complicated debate — while cheap gas has upended the economics of operating reactors, questions about whether to shut one down involve more than the bottom line.Gaza Needs Cement to Rebuild, But Israel Dominates the MarketGaza needs concrete, and lots of it. In the 2014 war, some 11,000 housing units were destroyed, and an additional 160,000 sustained damage — affecting more than a quarter of the families in the territory. As David Rocks and Yaacov Benmeleh write, Israeli-Palestinian politics have hampered the pace of recovery.The Walls Are Closing In on Cyril RamaphosaWhen Cyril Ramaphosa succeeded Jacob Zuma as South Africa’s president, he promised a “new dawn” after nine years of misrule that hobbled the economy. But as Michael Cohen reports, 18 months later, hopes have dissipated that the former labor union leader can orchestrate a turnaround.Modi Has Limited Options to Boost Economy in Locked Down KashmirPrime Minister Narendra Modi says his move to revoke Kashmir’s autonomy is about boosting its economy. But as Archana Chaudhary and Bibhudatta Pradhan report, observers say it will take more than rhetoric to bring investments to a state that’s lost more than 42,000 lives to conflict in the last three decades.And finally … Chile has one of the world’s largest reserves of fresh water outside the north and south poles. But its abundant glaciers are melting fast, with the ice mass now retreating one meter per year, Laura Millan Lombrana reports. The formations also happen to cover some of the massive copper deposits that make Chile the world’s largest producer of the metal — and uncovering those minerals also threatens to hasten the glaciers’ demise. To contact the author of this story: Ruth Pollard in New Delhi at rpollard2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Kathleen Hunter at khunter9@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The separatists’ takeover of Aden has strained a Saudi-led military coalition formed to confront the Iranian-aligned Houthis, who bombed a Saudi oil facility on Saturday.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    From transgender youth, to the Endangered Species Act, to Epstein, readers sound off on recent headlines.       
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Hashtags may still reign supreme on social media platforms such as Instagram and Twitter but a scathing interjection from none other than tech entrepreneur Elon Musk just might undermine their hegemony. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    An 8-month-old dugong nurtured by marine experts after it was found lost near a beach in southern Thailand has died of what biologists believe was a combination of shock and ingesting plastic waste, officials said Saturday. The female dugong — a large ocean mammal — was named "Marium" and became a hit in Thailand after images of biologists embracing and feeding her with milk and seagrass spread across social media. Veterinarians and volunteers had set out in canoes to feed Marium up to 15 times a day while also giving her health checks.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Beijing wants to use reforms to support a slowing economy.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Author: By PITCHA DANGPRASITH | APID: 1566037612791640600Sat, 2019-08-17 09:45 BANGKOK: An 8-month-old dugong nurtured by marine experts after it was found lost near a beach in southern Thailand has died of what biologists believe was a combination of shock and ingesting plastic waste, officials said Saturday. The female dugong — a large ocean mammal — was named “Marium” and became a hit in Thailand after images of biologists embracing and feeding her with milk and seagrass spread across social media. Veterinarians and volunteers had set out in canoes to feed Marium up to 15 times a day while also giving her health checks. Last week, she was found bruised after being chased and supposedly attacked by a male dugong during the mating season, said Jatuporn Buruspat, director-general of the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources. She was brought in for treatment in the artificial sea on Libong Island in Krabi province. “We assume she wandered off too far from her natural habitat and was chased and eventually attacked by another male dugong, or dugongs, as they feel attracted to her,” Jatuporn said Saturday. An autopsy showed a big amount of plastic waste in her intestine, which could also have played a part in her death as it led to gastritis and blood infection, he said. “She must have thought these plastics were edible,” Jatuporn said. The dugong is a species of marine mammal similar to the American manatee and can grow to about 3.4 meters (11 feet) in length. Its conservation status is listed as vulnerable. Natural Resources and Environment Minister Varawut Silpa-arcpha said Marium’s death saddens the whole nation and the world. “Her death will remind Thais and people all over the world not to dispose trash into the oceans,” Varawut said at a news conference. Main category: WorldTags: POLUTIONenvironmentplastic waste Saudi Islamic ministry organizes Eid ceremony in Thailand“Punch in the gut” as scientists find micro plastic in Arctic ice
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Tensions between Pakistan and India over the disputed territory of Kashmir could spark a nuclear conflict, Pakistan’s military spokesman said. The warning comes amid reports of more fighting along the Line of Control between them. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Editor’s note: Andrew C. McCarthy’s new book is Ball of Collusion: The Plot to Rig an Election and Destroy a Presidency. This is the fourth in a series of excerpts; the first can be read here, the second here, and the third here.The George Papadopoulos Origin Story has never added up. It has been portrayed as the Big Bang, the Magic Moment that started the FBI’s investigation of “collusion” -- a suspected election-theft conspiracy between Donald Trump’s campaign and Vladimir Putin’s regime. But if the young energy-sector analyst had actually emerged in early 2016 as the key to proving Trump–Russia espionage, you would think the FBI might have gotten around to interviewing him before January 27, 2017 — i.e., a week after President Trump had been inaugurated, and six months after the Bureau formally opened its “Crossfire Hurricane” probe.You would probably also think Papadopoulos, Suspect One in The Great Cyber Espionage Attack on Our Democracy, might have rated a tad more than the whopping 14-day jail sentence a federal judge eventually imposed on him. You might even suppose that he’d have been charged with some seditious felony involving clandestine operations against his own country, instead of . . . yes . . . fibbing to the FBI about the date of a meeting.That, however, does not scratch the surface. We are to believe that what led to the opening of the FBI’s Trump–Russia investigation, and what therefore is the plinth of the collusion narrative, is a breakfast meeting at a London hotel on April 26, 2016, between Papadopoulos and Joseph Mifsud, a Maltese academic we are supposed to take for a clandestine Russian agent. We are to take Papadopoulos’s word for it that Mifsud claimed Russia possessed “dirt” on Hillary Clinton in the form of “thousands” of “emails of Clinton.” We are further to believe that “the professor” elaborated that, in order to help Donald Trump’s candidacy, the Kremlin would release these “emails of Clinton” at a time chosen to do maximum damage to the Democratic nominee’s campaign.The story is based on no credible evidence. If it were ever presented to a jury, it would be laughed out of court.The Papadopoulos “collusion” claims (without collusion charges) are alleged in the Mueller report, which essentially repeats the grandiose “Statement of the Offense” that the special counsel included with the comparatively minor false-statement charge to which Papadopoulos pled guilty. Carefully parsed, this narrative stops short of alleging that the Trump adviser actually collaborated with a Russian agent. Rather, it claims that Papadopoulos engaged in a lot of twaddle with Mifsud, who he had reason to suspect might be a Russian agent. The pair brainstormed endlessly about potential high-level Trump-campaign meetings with the Putin regime, including [insert heavy breathing here] between Trump and Putin themselves. Papadopoulos then exaggerated these meanderings in emails to Trump-campaign superiors he was hot to impress.It is virtually certain that Mifsud was not a Russian agent. Whether he was an asset for any intelligence service, we cannot say with certainty at this point. But we can say that he had close contacts of significance with British intelligence, and with other Western governments.As Lee Smith relates, Mifsud has also long been associated with Claire Smith, a prominent British diplomat who served for years on Britain’s Joint Intelligence Committee, which answers directly to the prime minister. Ms. Smith was also a member of the United Kingdom’s Security Vetting Appeals Panel, which reviews denials of security clearances to government employees. During her career in the British foreign service, Smith worked with Mifsud at three different academic institutions: the London Academy of Diplomacy (which trained diplomats and government officials, some of them sponsored by the U.K.’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the British Council, or by their own governments), the University of Stirling, in Scotland, and Link Campus University in Rome, where Mifsud first met Papadopoulos. The campus is a well-known draw for diplomats and intelligence officials — the CIA holds conferences there, the FBI holds agent-training sessions there, and former U.S. intelligence officials teach there.In Rome on March 14, Papadopoulos met Joseph Mifsud. Twice Papadopoulos’s age, the Maltese professor gravitated to his fellow Link University lecturers and professors, who, as Lee Smith notes, “include senior Western diplomats and intelligence officials from a number of NATO countries, especially Italy and the United Kingdom.” Mifsud also taught at the University of Stirling and the London Academy of Diplomacy. That is to say, if Mifsud had actually been a Russian agent, he was situated to be one of the most successful in history.Not likely.Mifsud was a shameless self-promoter (at least until Russiagate notoriety sent him underground). He traveled frequently, including to Russia, where he participated in academic conferences and claimed acquaintance with regime officials — though how well he actually knows anyone of significance is unclear. In sum, Mifsud is the aging academic version of Papadopoulos. Thierry Pastor, a French political analyst who (with a Swiss-German lawyer named Stephan Roh) co-wrote a book about l’affaire Papadopoulos, made this observation about Mifsud’s brag that he knew Russian foreign minister Sergey Lavrov: “Yes, he met Lavrov. He met him once or twice in a large group. He knows Lavrov, but Lavrov doesn’t know Joseph. [Mifsud’s] contacts in Russia are with academics.”Nevertheless, the Trump–Russia narrative holds that Mifsud actually is a well-placed Russian agent who became interested in Papadopoulos upon discovering that he was a key (yup . . .) Trump adviser. According to this story, Mifsud introduced the younger man to a woman presented as Vladimir Putin’s niece. The professor also hooked Papadopoulos up with Ivan Timofeev, whom prosecutors pregnantly described as “the Russian MFA connection” (as in the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs — Lavrov’s office) when they eventually charged Papadopoulos with making false statements. Timofeev and Papadopoulos had fevered discussions about setting up a Putin–Trump meeting in Russia. Finally, at their April 26 breakfast in London, Mifsud let slip that Russia had “dirt” on Hillary Clinton in the form of “thousands” of “emails of Clinton” — which, the narrative holds, must ...
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The U.S. has threatened to end Turkey’s participation in the F-35 fighter program by July 31 if Ankara doesn’t scrap the S-400 deal.A Bloomberg report says Turkey has been stockpiling parts for F-16s and other military equipment in anticipation of a U.S. sanction for acquiring the Russian S-400 air defense system.Two anonymous officials from Turkey who spoke to the news outlet refused to clarify on what types of spares were accumulated, how much was acquired and how long they can last.Relations between the two countries deteriorated over the course of the Syrian civil war, when the U.S. armed a Kurdish militia that Turkey views as a terrorist group, and in the aftermath of a 2016 coup attempt against Erdogan that his government blames on a Turkish imam residing in the U.S.NATO member Turkey is determined to acquire ballistic missile technology, and aims to co-produce the next generation of the S-400, the officials added, citing discussions with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Erdogan said his country will take delivery of the S-400 within days.“The first batch of S-400s will be delivered in a week or 10 days,” Haberturk newspaper cited him as saying in a report Monday. “I’ve clearly told this to Trump, Mr. Putin also said it.”The U.S. argues that the pivot to Moscow could allow Russia to collect critical intelligence that would weaken NATO and compromise the American F-35 stealth fighter, which Turkish companies are helping to build. Yet while Congress is drawing up potential sanctions plans that at their harshest would cripple the Turkish economy, U.S. President Donald Trump has cast Turkey as a victim in the saga.At the Group of 20 nations meeting in Japan on Saturday, the U.S. president said Erdogan was treated unfairly by the Obama administration when he sought to buy the U.S. built Patriot air-defense system. While the S-400 deal is “a problem,” the U.S. is “looking at different solutions,” he said.Turkey in fact turned to Russia to address weaknesses in its air defense after failing to persuade the U.S. to share technology from its Patriot air-defense system as part of any acquisition deal.A resolution submitted to the House of Representatives seeking sanctions against Turkey may hold a clue to the focus of Turkey’s parts-buying spree.“In addition to the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, Turkish defense acquisition programs that could be affected by sanctions include the Patriot air and missile defense system, CH-47F Chinook heavy lift helicopter, UH-60 Black Hawk utility helicopter and F-16s,” the resolution says.The U.S. has threatened to end Turkey’s participation in the F-35 fighter program by July 31 if Ankara doesn’t scrap the S-400 deal.If Turkey is excluded from the F-35 program, it will look for alternatives, including Russian Su-57 jets, while trying to develop its own warplanes and ballistic missiles for domestic use and export, the Turkish officials said.If Turkey had to buy the Su-57 it would be the first country (outside Russia) to buy the first Russian stealth fighter after India dropped out of Sukhoi/HAL Fifth Generation Fighter Aircraft (FGFA), known in India as the Perspective Multirole Fighter (PMF), which actually was a derivative project of the Sukhoi Su-57.The Sukhoi Su-57 is a stealth, single-seat, twin-engine multirole fifth-generation fighter aircraft designed for air superiority and attack roles. The aircraft is the product of the PAK FA (literally “Prospective Airborne Complex of Frontline Aviation”) program. Sukhoi’s internal designation for the aircraft is T-50.In fact, Russian state media claimed that the Su-57 will feature a maximum speed of 1,600 mph, slightly more than that of the F-22 Raptor, and that its missile range, based on the information available, also exceeds that of the F-22.This first appeared in Aviation Geek Club here. Image: Creative Commons. (This first appeared earlier in July 2019.)
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The captain of a Spanish charity ship carrying 134 rescued migrants warned Friday of an “explosive” situation on board the vessel anchored within swimming distance of Italy’s Lampedusa island but forbidden to approach.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    As the trade war continues to escalate, China is becoming increasingly active in Iran and is considering retaliating with what has long been described as the country’s ‘nuclear option’. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    If all goes well, the ship should be operational by 2020. If the current schedule holds, Ford should be able to work up with an air wing and deploy in 2021 or 2022.The United States Navy will commission the first of a new generation of aircraft carriers into service today.The future USS Gerald R. Ford ​(CVN-78) will represent the future of naval aviation and will be the most advanced and capable aircraft carrier ever built.(This first appeared several years ago.)With Ford’s imminent commissioning ceremony coming up later this month, the Navy invited The National Interest to preview the mighty warship and see the new vessel’s technology firsthand on July 10.Recommended: How North Korea Could Start a WarRecommended: This Is What Happens if America Nuked North KoreaRecommended: The Colt Python: The Best Revolver Ever Made?Even at first glance, PCU Gerald R. Ford is an impressive sight even as she was moored pierside at Norfolk Naval Station in Virginia next to older Nimitz-class carriers USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69)—one of America’s oldest flattops, USS George Washington (CVN-73) and USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN-72).Immediately noticeable is that Gerald R. Ford’s island is not only smaller than that of the Nimitz-class carriers, but that the structure is set further astern by about 140ft and slightly further starboard. Moreover, unlike regular fleet carriers, the brand-new Ford is still in pristine condition and sports a gold-painted anchor—a badge of honor noting that she has an exceptionally high crew retention rate.Entering the massive vessel via one of her three aircraft elevators—Nimitz-class ships have four—into her cavernous hangar bay, Ford’s interior looks similar to that of other carriers. However, whereas the Nimitz-class has three partitions in their hangar bays, the new CVN-78-class has only two in order to simplify maintenance.As we walked into the interior to climb up to the bridge, the air conditioning is immediately noticeable. Ford is able to produce 9,900 tons of air conditioning—which not only makes for a more productive crew but should reduce maintenance requirements for new vessels because of reduced humidity. Indeed, the key tenant of the entire CVN-78-class is improved maintainability and efficiency. Unlike previous carriers, Ford is projected to enter drydock only once every 12 years.Climbing up into Ford’s bridge, the systems are far more advanced than anything else in the Navy’s fleet other than the new Zumwalt-class guided missile destroyers. All of the controls and navigational systems are completely digital and use touch-screen interfaces. The only concession to the past is a metal wheel connected to an electronic steering and transmission system—though the ship does have backup systems.The entire ship features far greater automation—with far greater reliance on electrical and electronic systems—than any other carrier in the fleet. To power her systems and to meet future growth requirements, Ford’s twin nuclear reactors are almost three times more powerful than the ones onboard the Nimitz-class—generating 250 percent more electricity. Indeed, sister PCU John F. Kennedy (CVN-79)—currently under construction—will adopt electrically-powered elevators, further reducing the need for hydraulic systems.Primary flight control—which is a few more decks up on the island—is similarly high-tech, but aside from a few modifications to the firefighting system—the setup is very similar to the Nimitz-class according to Lt. Commander Jon Biehl, Ford’s mini-boss (deputy air boss) and Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet pilot. Biehl said he is very confident in the new carrier’s systems though the ship has yet to be tested in launching and recovering real aircraft.“Very confident, it’s proven to be successful,” Biehl said.Several decks down in Flight-deck Control, I was surprised to see a traditional “Ouija board,” which visually indicates the position and status of aircraft on the ship’s flight deck using scaled aircraft templates and various pins and washers. Ford has automated systems that track the location and status of the ship’s aircraft, but the crew setup the Ouija board as a manual backup—and for the sake of tradition.“We kept the Ouija board for guys just like you that come into flight deck control and it’s just not flight deck control if the Ouija board is not here,” Lt. Commander Jamie Roman, Ford’s aircraft handling officer told me.“This was not part of the ship’s design, this was taken out because we have a system that will track the aircraft called ADMACS [Aviation Data Management and Control System.”   Our next stop was the flight-deck, which we reached via the hangar bay via one of Ford’s three aircraft elevators. Ford’s rearranged and reconfigured flight deck—which is 1,106ft long and somewhat wider than the Nimitz-class’—visibly looks and feels considerably larger than that of previous generation aircraft carriers.Underneath, the massive steel deck, Ford is equipped with four Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch Systems (EMALS) and an Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) which are replacing their steam and hydraulically driven equivalents onboard the Nimitz-class (and which allows for unrestricted operation of the 4 catapult). The ship also features 40 refueling stations and a revised configuration for her weapons elevators. The ship could achieve between 25 and 33 percent greater sortie generation rates than her predecessors once she has been fully tested according to Navy projections.Capt. Brent Gaut, Ford’s executive officer, said that the next steps for the ship and her crew after commissioning will be to move into the test and evaluation phase. By the end of July, the ship is expected to set sail for a 10 to 12-day shakedown period where the crew will begin to test all of Ford’s systems including the EMALS and AAG. If all goes well, the ship will be certified to launch and recover aircraft by the end of September or early October.“The systems I think, in theory, are just phenomenal and designed to perform a certain way,” Gault said.“And now the challenge is to be able to go out and make sure they are able to meet the mark and they allow us to do what we need to do, which is put the ship in harm’s way and go out and fight the fight. So we need to make sure we get there first.”Capt. Rick McCormack, Ford’s commanding officer, said that the ship has already tested the EMALS and AAG with dead loads, and as such, he is very confident that the systems will work as advertised. Indeed, both systems have proven themselves in testing, but the Navy has to be certain that they meet operational standards at sea.“I’m very very confident that the EMALS will do everything we need it to,” McCormack said.“But bottom line, that’s why we’re here. We’re here to test and evaluate these systems.”As McCormack explained, the ...
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    British finance minister Sajid Javid said he would make 600 million pounds available to support the building of 50,000 new homes by investing in necessary infrastructure, the latest spending pledge by the new government.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The actor best remembered for Easy Rider has died at the age of 79. Here we look back at his life and career Continue reading...
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Over three decades of protests, the styles have changed, but the message stays the same.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The Grace 1 was seized by British Royal Marines at the western mouth of the Mediterranean on July 4.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A Spanish ferry packed with hundreds of tourists and their cars has run aground on her way from Ibiza and Majorca, setting off a dramatic rescue effort throughout the night by coast guard and other emergency services. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Author: AFPID: 1566034934591531900Sat, 2019-08-17 09:32 SRINAGAR, India: India and Pakistan exchanged “heavy” cross-border fire on Saturday, after New Delhi’s move to strip the restive Kashmir region of its autonomy prompted a rare meeting of the UN Security Council. The two foes regularly fire potshots over the Line of Control (LoC) in the disputed Himalayan territory, which is divided between the two countries and poisoned their relations since independence in 1947. But the latest exchange follows India’s decision this month to rip up the special constitutional status of its part of Kashmir, sparking protests from the local population, outrage from Pakistan and unease from neighboring China. “The exchange of fire is going on,” a senior Indian government official said, calling it “heavy.” One Indian soldier was reportedly killed. Pakistan made no immediate comment on the violence. Late Friday, Pakistan and China succeeded in getting the UN Security Council to discuss Kashmir — behind closed doors — for the first time since the Indo-Pakistan war of 1971. Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan on Saturday hailed the gathering, saying that addressing the “suffering of the Kashmiri people & ensuring resolution of the dispute is the responsibility of this world body.” New Delhi insists the status of the territory is a purely internal matter. “We don’t need international busybodies to try to tell us how to run our lives. We are a billion-plus people,” India’s UN envoy Syed Akbaruddin said after the meeting. US President Donald Trump urged the nuclear-armed rivals to come back to the negotiating table, speaking to Khan by phone on the importance of “reducing tensions through bilateral dialogue.” India on Saturday meanwhile gradually restored phone lines following an almost two-week communications blackout in its part of Kashmir, imposed hours before Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s surprise August 5 gambit. Seventeen out of around 100 telephone exchanges were restored Saturday in the restive Kashmir Valley, the local police chief said. But mobiles and the Internet remained dead in the Muslim-majority Kashmir Valley, the main hotbed of resistance to Indian rule in Jammu and Kashmir state in a 30-year-old conflict that has killed tens of thousands. Fearing an angry and potentially violent response, India also sent 10,000 extra troops to the area, severely restricted movement and arrested some 500 local politicians, activists, academics and others. The state’s Chief Secretary BVR Subrahmanyam had said Friday there would be a “gradual” restoration of phone lines over the weekend, with schools to resume classes in some areas next week. The transformation of Srinagar into an eerie maze of barricades, soldiers and concertinas of barbed wire has failed to stop public anger boiling to the surface. “We want peace and nothing else, but they have kept us under this lockdown like sheep while taking decisions about us,” resident Tariq Madri said. “Even my nine-year old son asked me why they had locked us inside,” he added. Several hundred protesters clashed with police in the city on Friday, who responded with tear gas and pellet-firing shotguns. People hurled stones and used shop hoardings and tin sheets as improvised shields, as police shot dozens of rounds into the crowd. No injuries were reported. The clashes broke out after more than 3,000 people rallied in the city’s Soura neighborhood, which has witnessed regular demonstrations this month. A week earlier around 8,000 people staged a protest which also ended in a violent confrontation with police, residents said. “I want the government to know that this aggression and aggressive policies don’t work on the ground,” said 24-year-old Adnan Rashid, an engineering student. Some people took to the streets on Saturday to buy essential goods but most shops in Srinagar remained closed. Mohammed Altaf Malik, 30, said people remained angry about the stripping of Kashmir’s special status “and the way it was done.” “There is widespread corruption and the police here have made it a business to pick up any people it wants and then ask for money to release them from detention,” Malik said as he went to visit a sick neighbor in hospital. “We don’t see anything changing from this for ordinary people like us,” he added. Main category: WorldTags: PakistanIndiaLine of ControlKashmir Pakistan PM welcomes UN’s move to discuss KashmirIndia easing restrictions in Kashmir as international pressure mounts
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The United States has issued a warrant to seize an Iranian oil tanker caught in the standoff between Tehran and the West in a last ditch effort to prevent the vessel from leaving Gibraltar. The Grace 1 was seized by British Royal Marines at the western mouth of the Mediterranean on July 4 on suspicion of violating European Union sanctions by taking oil to Syria. Gibraltar lifted the detention order on Thursday after the British territory's chief minister said he had secured written assurances from Tehran that the cargo would not go to Syria. But with the vessel and its 2.1 million barrels of oil free to leave, the United States launched a separate legal appeal to impound the ship on the grounds that it had links to Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), which it designates as a terrorist organization. A federal court in Washington issued a warrant to seize the tanker, the oil it carries and nearly $1 million. "A network of front companies allegedly laundered millions of dollars in support of such shipments," the U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, Jessie Liu, said in a news release. "The scheme involves multiple parties affiliated with the IRGC and furthered by the deceptive voyages of the Grace 1." The U.S. State Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment on how the warrant, which was addressed to "the United States Marshal's Service and/or any other duly authorized law enforcement officer," may be enforced. The Pentagon declined to comment, as did the British Foreign Office. Asked on Friday about the U.S. intervention, Gibraltar's chief minister, Fabian Picardo, said that would be subject to the jurisdiction of Gibraltar's Supreme Court. "It could go back to the court absolutely." The Gibraltar Chronicle newspaper reported that the vessel was unlikely to sail before Sunday, citing an unnamed source who added that it was waiting for six new crew members including a captain to arrive. The Grace 1 had its name erased and it was no longer flying a Panama flag. Iranian state television had quoted Jalil Eslami, deputy head of the country's Ports and Maritime Organisation, as saying the tanker would depart for the Mediterranean after being reflagged under the Iranian flag and renamed Adrian Darya.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A Conservative lawmaker at the centre of efforts to block a no-deal Brexit said on Saturday he was pessimistic about his chances because he and other party colleagues could not support a caretaker government led by opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    More than 50,000 landline have been made operational in Kashmir as India begins to lift communication restrictions imposed on the disputed territory. 2G mobile internet was also restored to five districts. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    More than 50,000 landline have been made operational in Kashmir as India begins to lift communication restrictions imposed on the disputed territory. 2G mobile internet was also restored to five districts. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    An ill-fated comet’s death-plunge into the fiery surface of the Sun has been captured on video by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) space telescope. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Critic of China’s Detention Camps Is Free, but Silence May Be the Price  The New York TimesKazakh advocate of Muslim rights in China set free in plea bargain  ReutersXinjiang activist freed in Kazakh court after agreeing to stop campaigning  The GuardianView full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The United States has cut Pakistan’s foreign aid by $440 million, according to reports, sending mixed signals as Donald Trump seeks mediation between New Delhi and Islamabad over the crisis in Kashmir. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Medical authorities say it is unclear whether patients will fully recover
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A Chinese carrier rocket designed for commercial use has made its maiden flight, carrying three satellites into orbit. State media released footage of the successful launch. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Iranian oil tanker Grace 1
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The US Justice Department issued a warrant Friday for the seizure of the Iranian oil supertanker Grace 1, one day after a Gibraltar judge allowed the release of the detained vessel.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The US Justice Department issued a warrant Friday for the seizure of the Iranian oil supertanker Grace 1, one day after a Gibraltar judge allowed the release of the detained vessel.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    In the final instalment of the Kibera series, the musician describes his journey from Kenya’s largest slum to LondonSamson Odhiambo Otieno’s early life was never going to be easy. Born into a life of poverty in Kibera, Nairobi, at a young age he endured the death of his mother and siblings, and rejection by his new step-mother. Forced out of the only home he knew he became one of Kenya’s street children, living on the road, making his way through life the best he could.Otieno, now 29, attended the launch of the Guardian’s Kibera: living in the slum exhibition to catch up with the life he once knew and memories he treasures dearly, through the images of his hometown – a far cry from where he is now. Continue reading...
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Russia’s space agency claims to have found an unconventional way of equipping its satellites with stealth features, effectively making them hard to spot from Earth. A special wrap may be the solution, they say. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Actor Peter Fonda, the son of a Hollywood legend who became a movie star in his own right after both writing and starring in the counter-culture classic “Easy Rider,” died Friday at his home of complications from lung cancer. He was 79.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Tear gas in Hong Kong, the poise of Simone Biles, the beauty of nature – the last seven days, as captured by the world’s best photojournalists Continue reading...
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Huawei has never engaged in hacking activities, the company’s vice president of strategy, Andrew Williamson, told RT after a report claimed its technicians helped African governments to snoop on political opponents. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Japan has offered the US its best nuclear-cleanup robots – designed for Fukushima – for use in dismantling North Korea’s nuclear facilities, hoping to remain in the loop as Washington and Pyongyang talk denuclearization. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A face-off between demonstrators and the police ended without violence on Saturday, days after concerns were raised about spiraling mayhem.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    President Donald Trump's former campaign manager, Corey Lewandowski, said on Friday that he was "happy" to testify before the Democratic-led U.S. House Judiciary Committee as part of a congressional investigation of the Trump presidency.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Demonstrators opposed to the building of a telescope on Mauna Kea, the state’s highest peak, have forged a communityThe actor Jason Momoa exchanges a traditional greeting with an elder while visiting protesters last month. Photograph: Hollyn Johnson/APOn Hawaii’s Big Island, a protest against a $1.4bn observatory on Mauna Kea, a mountain considered sacred by many Native Hawaiians, is entering a second month. In that time, the protest site has swelled from a few hundred to several thousands, attracted celebrity visitors, and built a community of Native Hawaiians who see it as a pivotal moment.The protest site sits at an elevation of 6,632ft, where the cold wind whips across hardened lava fields. But amid this inhospitable environment, weeks of demonstration have given rise to a sense of permanence.The site stretches across a two-lane highway, where trucks flying a Native Hawaiian flag and the upside-down state flag line both sides of the road. A “Kūpuna tent”, where the elders of the community gather, is strategically placed to block an access road up the mountain in order to stop construction vehicles from reaching the summit.New arrivals are encouraged to sign in at an orientation station. There is a tented cafeteria providing free meals, and a community-run medic station, daycare and school. Along the barren roadside, tropical flowers have been casually stuck in traffic cones. People pound taro, a Hawaiian crop, in the traditional way on wooden boards to make poi, a local dish.The protest stems from controversy over the fate of Mauna Kea, the tallest peak in Hawaii and the proposed site of an enormous observatory known as the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). The summit, 13,796ft above sea level, is said to be an ideal location to look into deep space. TMT is expected to capture images ‘that look back to the beginning of the universe. Protesters, who call themselves kia‘i, or “protectors”, argue the construction will further desecrate Mauna Kea, which is already home to about a dozen telescopes.The sun sets behind telescopes at the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Photograph: Caleb Jones/APKealoha Pisciotta, one of the protest leaders and a spokesperson for Mauna Kea Anaina Hou, a Native Hawaiian group, says the movement is “pushing back on corporate culture” through Hawaiian concepts of “Kapu Aloha”, which emphasizes compassionate responses, especially towards opponents, and “Aloha ʻĀina”, a saying that translates to “love of the land”.“We are just joining the world’s indigenous movements,” Pisciotta says. “We need Kapu Aloha ... to bring back the balance from the insanity and destruction of our earth.”Pisciotta said that the protesters were showing the world a way “to really live differently” while protecting the land.“For Native Hawaiians, there is a question of our right to self-determination as defined by international law, but I think it’s so much bigger than that,” said Pisciotta. “It’s about us learning to live and be interdependent.” Why are the protests happening?Protesters continue their vigil, on 19 July. Photograph: Bruce Asato/APHawaiians consider Mauna Kea sacred for numerous reasons. The mountain is known as the home to Wākea, the sky god, who partnered with Papahānaumoku, the earth goddess. Protesters hope to protect and help restore the native ecosystem on Mauna Kea.But the protests are also part of a legacy for Native Hawaiians that goes back to 1893, when the Hawaiian Kingdom was overthrown. Hawaiians lost their land as well as their culture, as the latter was suppressed through law and religion. It wasn’t until the 1970s, during a period of cultural flourishing known as the Hawaiian Renaissance, that the Hawaiian language was allowed to be spoken in school and that the hula was revived.The period was defined by its own resistance movement, as activists focused on stopping the US military from using Kahoʻolawe, one of the eight main Hawaiian Islands, as a target for bombing practice. After more than a decade of peaceful protests and occupations of the island, the US government ended the live-fire training in the 1990s.Some see the latest protest action as a new Hawaiian Renaissance. Days are punctuated by the blowing of the conch shell to announce ceremonies that include chanting, hula, and hoʻokupu (offerings). Several celebrities with Hawaii ties have travelled here to participate, including Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Jason Momoa, and Jack Johnson.Hawaii’s governor, David Ige, right, watches a performance during a visit to the ninth day of protests against the Thirty Meter Telescope, on 23 July. Photograph: Jamm Aquino/AP“The atmosphere here is incredible. We’re all here protecting our ʻāina [land]”, said Kamuela Park, a protester at the site. He added that it had been “awesome to see people from all spectrums coming here in support”.Peaceful demonstrators have faced one major confrontation with police. Three days into the protest, 38 kūpuna (revered elders) were arrested for blocking the road that leads to the construction site. That same day, Hawaii’s governor, David Ige, signed an emergency proclamation giving law enforcement more control over the area and allowed them to bring in National Guard troops. Images of the elderly being arrested quickly spread, garnering sympathy for the movement and attracting more people to the site. What comes next?Demonstrators block a road at the base of Hawaii’s tallest mountain, on 15 July. Photograph: Caleb Jones/APNegotiations between government officials and protesters have slowed since the arrests. On 30 July, the governor rescinded his emergency proclamation. He also extended the window during which construction could begin from 60 days to two years, meaning the protesters would theoretically need to block the road until September 2021.“I want to assure everyone that we are committed. Our law enforcement officers will remain at the site to ensure the safety of all of those involved,” said Ige at a press conference. “We continue to seek and find a peaceful solution to move this project forward.”While tensions may have eased, protesters have said they will stay until they stop TMT from being built. Demonstrators proved their endurance in early August as many of them stayed at the protest site while two consecutive storms passed by the islands.Pisciotta, ...
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    What a mysterious explosion tells us about Russia's 'doomsday weapon'  CNNAn explosion. An abruptly-canceled evacuation. Five dead nuclear experts. And a few traces of radioactive iodine in Norway. These are the fingerprints of what ...View full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    “Fact-checking” site Snopes has been vindicated in its decision to fact-check satire by a study proving people (especially Republicans) often mistake satirical site Babylon Bee for real news. Or has it? Claim rated: mostly false. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    “Fact-checking” site Snopes has been vindicated in its decision to fact-check satire by a study proving people (especially Republicans) often mistake satirical site Babylon Bee for real news. Or has it? Claim rated: mostly false. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Skepticism about the talks in Oslo remains high among opposition leaders and U.S. officials, some of whom say Maduro may be trying to prevent further international isolation.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Antonio Basco, whose wife Margie Reckard was murdered during a shooting at a Walmart store
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    US President Donald Trump has took another swipe at Rep. Rashida Tlaib, saying that the “only winner" of her decision to pass on an Israeli invitation to visit on “humanitarian grounds” was her 90-year-old Palestinian grandmother. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    US President Donald Trump has took another swipe at Rep. Rashida Tlaib, saying that the “only winner" of her decision to pass on an Israeli invitation to visit on “humanitarian grounds” was her 90-year-old Palestinian grandmother. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Iowa's Republican Senator Chuck Grassley said the Trump administration's Environmental Protection Agency has "screwed" the U.S. ethanol industry and farmers by granting waivers to 31 small petroleum refineries, effectively exempting them from an obligation to use more ethanol in their products.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Amazon.com Inc on Friday defeated an appeal by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service in what the online retailer has called a $1.5 billion dispute over its tax treatment of transactions with a Luxembourg subsidiary.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A federal judge in California on Friday urged the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and Volkswagen AG to resolve a civil suit stemming from its Dieselgate emissions scandal.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The Oscar-nominated son of Henry Fonda and brother to Jane Fonda died of respiratory failure from lung cancer in Los Angeles, his family said Friday.       
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Two women who said they were recruited 15 years ago to provide massages to Jeffrey Epstein, only to be later sexually molested by him at his Manhattan mansion, have filed a $100 million lawsuit against the financier's estate.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The 2009 US-backed coup in Honduras caused the migration crisis US President Donald Trump has weaponized, creating a situation where “everybody’s making money except the Honduran people,” writer Max Blumenthal tells RT America. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Zimbabweans weather repeated crackdowns amid an implosion of public services. 
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A constitutional law expert weighed in on the ethics commissioner’s report and took issue with one finding in particular.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Thousands of travelers at U.S. airports faced delays on Friday because of an nationwide outage of U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (CBP) processing systems that lasted several hours.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    President Jose Manuel Zelaya of Honduras was deposed from power in a military coup after joining a progressive alliance of Latin American leaders and he has “absolutely no doubts” the US was behind his ouster, he tells RT America. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A priest who appeared in The Exorcist has been accused of allegedly grooming and sexually abusing a student at the Jesuit high school where he taught.William O’Malley, who plays Father Dyer in the 1973 horror film, is one of several people named in a lawsuit filed as part of the Child Victims Act, which enables New Yorkers who were allegedly abused as children to file civil cases with no time or age limit for one year.According to court papers obtained by The Independent, O’Malley allegedly “used his position as a priest” to “groom and to sexually abuse” a student at McQuaid Jesuit High School. The plaintiff, who has remained anonymous, was approximately 17 years old when the alleged abuse occurred, the lawsuit claims.It also alleges that O’Malley, now 87, sexually abused the student “multiple times” from approximately 1985 to 1986.The Diocese of Rochester and McQuaid Jesuit High School are both named among several defendants in the suit. O’Malley’s name appears among numerous others in the complaint.McQuaid told The Independent in a statement that it expects to receive claims as the Child Victims Act goes into effect."It is our sincere hope that this will be a time of healing for our brothers," the school said in a statement, although it declined to comment on specific claims.One of the lawyers listed on the lawsuit confirmed that the priest named in the complaint was the same as the one whose name appears in the credits of the horror film.He appeared in the news in 2012 after reportedly being dismissed from his teaching role at Fordham Prep, another Jesuit school, for his “abrasive” teaching style, the New York Post reported at the time.Hundreds of sexual abuse lawsuits have been filed in New York courts after the one-year window set by the Child Victims Act opened on Wednesday.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The US Strategic Command, which oversees America’s nuclear arsenal, plans to name a new facility after the legendary but controversial bomber General Curtis LeMay, who notoriously said there are ‘no innocent civilians.’ Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The US Strategic Command, which oversees America’s nuclear arsenal, plans to name a new facility after the legendary but controversial bomber General Curtis LeMay, who notoriously said there are ‘no innocent civilians.’ Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Will H Ogilvie was lauded in Australia but overlooked by many of his fellow Scots during his lifetime.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Will H Ogilvie was lauded in Australia but overlooked by many of his fellow Scots during his lifetime.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    He suffered 'serious internal injuries' in the incident
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Victims of the deadly Tubbs Fire in 2017 won the right to pursue lawsuits against PG&E; Corp. on Friday in spite of state investigators’ declaration that the utility wasn’t to blame for the fire.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Since being started nine years ago, Elrow events have reached every continent in the world.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Hundreds of Google employees are calling on the company to pledge it won't work with U.S. Customs and Border Protection or Immigration and Customs Enforcement. A group of employees called Googlers for Human Rights posted a public petition urging the company not to bid on a cloud computing contract for CBP, the federal agency that oversees law enforcement for the country's borders. It is not clear if Google expressed interest.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Trump's tweet comes a day after Apple put out a press release describing the money it spends on U.S.-based suppliers and vendors.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    US officials expecting Iran to launch rocket in coming days  CNNWashington (CNN) The US government is in possession of classified imagery that shows Iran is getting ready to launch a rocket as soon as next week that the ...View full coverage on Google News
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Saudi judge denies mother custody for being too Western  CNN
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    PATCO police are investigating the death of a child found inside a vehicle at a Hi-Speedline train station in Lindenwold, New Jersey.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    U.S. Customs and Border Protection said its computers were coming back online and travelers were being processed after a nationwide computer outage earlier on Friday at U.S. airports.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Peter Fonda, the actor made famous by the 1969 biker movie ‘Easy Rider,’ has passed away after battling lung cancer. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Peter Fonda, the actor made famous by the 1969 biker movie ‘Easy Rider,’ has passed away after battling lung cancer. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine on Friday said Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama will anchor the U.S. space agency's program to build a spacecraft to put astronauts back on the moon by 2024, a boon for the state and a disappointment for Texas.
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Both sides may try to seem tough ahead of Brexit talks, but the EU needs the deal as much as the UK, George Galloway said in reference to leaks claiming that Germany is reluctant to renegotiate an agreement with Britain. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    Both sides may try to seem tough ahead of Brexit talks, but the EU needs the deal as much as the UK, George Galloway said in reference to leaks claiming that Germany is reluctant to renegotiate an agreement with Britain. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    A look at the women who are not often named in history textbooks but stood alongside those who are.       
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    LAS VEGAS, NEV: Actor Peter Fonda rides a cool sleek motorcycle - known to motorcycle enthusiasts as a "chopper" bike with a "raked" front--in a scene from his latest film, "Easy Rider." The Columbia Pictures release has no plot except for a basic theme, which is what happens to two young men experiencing "the ultimate freedom" by traveling across country on motorcycle
  • Saturday 17 August, 2019
    The US has ordered the seizure of newly freed Iranian oil tanker 'Grace 1,' charging the ship with illegally using the US financial system to sell oil to Syria to support the IRGC after Gibraltar released the vessel. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
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  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Bugatti unveiled its latest limited-edition model at a classic car show in California Friday. The Bugatti Centodieci will cost $9 million and only 10 will be made.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Fresh from the memes purge, Instagram is getting more 'alert' to 'fake content,' urging users to report it with a touch of a button. Experienced ‘fact-checkers’ from its parent company Facebook will take it from there. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Teamwork wins! Watch these adorable brothers, Georgie and Wilder, celebrate after pulling off a daring crib escape.       
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    A suspect vandalized a sand sculpture in Hawaii.       
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Corey Lewandowski, the former Trump campaign aide who was subpoenaed Thursday by the House Judiciary Committee, said on Friday that he fully intended to appear before the panel.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    August political cartoons: A satirical look at current issues and events, compliments of the USA TODAY network cartoonists.       
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Jeffrey Epstein’s prison death has been confirmed a suicide by hanging, the medical examiner’s office said Friday.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Hundreds of passengers were stranded for hours at Los Angeles, New York and Washington international airports, as US Customs and Border Protection systems were plagued by 'technical ‘issues.’ Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Hundreds of passengers were stranded for hours at Los Angeles, New York and Washington international airports, as US Customs and Border Protection systems were plagued by 'technical ‘issues.’ Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Anthony Scaramucci, onetime supporter turned vocal critic of US President Donald Trump, got locked out of Twitter for what the platform said was “abusive behavior,” after calling the president fat. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Anthony Scaramucci, onetime supporter turned vocal critic of US President Donald Trump, got locked out of Twitter for what the platform said was “abusive behavior,” after calling the president fat. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    New York’s chief medical examiner has ruled that Jeffrey Epstein committed suicide by hanging in his jail cell, six days after the accused billionaire was found dead in the Metropolitan Correctional Center in New York City. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    New York’s chief medical examiner has ruled that Jeffrey Epstein committed suicide by hanging in his jail cell, six days after the accused billionaire was found dead in the Metropolitan Correctional Center in New York City. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Jeffrey Epstein appears in a photograph taken for the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services' sex offender registry
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    The traditional woolly headgear of the North Caucasus, the papakha, made famous by UFC lightweight champ Khabib Nurmagomdeov, has made its way to American soil once again, although this time it was an American wearing it. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    An Iranian tanker seized by Gibraltar last month is preparing to set sail after being released, a senior Iranian shipping official said Friday.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Markets would like Fed Chairman Jerome Powell to clarify whether the Fed sees itself at the beginning of a serious, longer-term rate cutting cycle.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    U.S. troops will leave, but prospects for Afghanistan’s future are far from clear.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Fewer than 60,000 people live on the mostly ice-covered island.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Donna Francis leaves Westminster Magistrate's Court in July 2018
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    As unrest enters an uncertain new phase, a few influential groups have emerged to subtly steer a movement that otherwise lacks a nucleus.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Word that US President Donald Trump is pushing for a sale of F-16 fighters to Taiwan worth $8 billion is unlikely to help a ‘deal’ with China, as Beijing’s already blaming Washington for the Hong Kong protests and the tariff war. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    New Chancellor Sajid Javid is looking at how best to take advantage of record-low borrowing costs when he sets out his first budget later this year, according to an interview published late on Friday.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Veteran MPs from the ruling Conservative and opposition Labour parties have both said they would be willing to lead an emergency government to halt a no-deal Brexit, the leader of the pro-EU Liberal Democrats said on Friday.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Kung fu film star Jackie Chan has joined Mulan actress Liu Yifei in stoking outrage over pro-Beijing comments amid heated protests in Hong Kong, his birthplace, and calling for peace. The torches and pitchforks came out online. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) said her trip would have required her to sign a pledge not to “promote boycotts against Israel” while there.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    President Donald Trump called a man overweight who he thought was a protester at his rally in New Hampshire, only to learn later he had ridiculed a supporter.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Bugatti debuted its most powerful supercar at Pebble Beach on Friday: a $10 million,1,600 horsepower throwback to the '90s that sprints from 0 to 62 mph in 2.4 seconds.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    A man armed with a knife and clad in a bulletproof vest has been taken into custody outside the Israeli Embassy in the US capital. His intentions remain unclear and the suspect has yet to be identified. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    A man armed with a knife and clad in a bulletproof vest has been taken into custody outside the Israeli Embassy in the US capital. His intentions remain unclear and the suspect has yet to be identified. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Amnesty International voiced growing concern Friday for the safety of a Libyan lawmaker after her “horrific” night-time abduction in the city of Benghazi.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Mr Trump claimed Frank Dawson had a 'serious weight problem'
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Lawmakers have said they believed Gen. John E. Hyten was wrongly accused by an Army colonel. The materials shed light on how they may have reached that conclusion.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Actresses Eva Longoria, America Ferrara and more than 200 other Latino artists and civil rights leaders on Friday penned a letter of support to the Latino community in the United States after a mass shooting in Texas and immigration raids in Mississippi.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Strong gravitational ripples in the cosmos have revealed what experts believe is the first ever detection of a doomed neutron star being swallowed by a black hole. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
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  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    RT Sport presents the serialized documentary film ‘Dagestan: Land of Warriors’ exploring one of Russia’s North Caucasus regions which, despite its modest size and population, produces top-level martial artists year-on-year. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    In comparative terms, CEOs now make on average 278 times the average worker's salary, according to the Economic Policy Institute.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Siri outperformed Google Assistant in correctly responding to commands, the study's authors said.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    A girl who tried to become the first female member of a 554-year old Berlin boys’ choir has lost her gender discrimination case after a court ruled that the choir had not been sexist when it rejected her application. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    President Donald Trump held a call on Wednesday with the CEOs of three major U.S. banks, according to people with knowledge of the situation.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    A new IRS online tool could turn out to be pretty useful for those trying to get a better handle on how much they're withholding in taxes.       
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Israel’s interior minister has fired another shot in the scuffle over US lawmaker Rashida Tlaib’s (D-MI) plan to visit the West Bank, accusing the congresswoman of staging a ‘provocation’ to humiliate Israel. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Kitchen appliances resembling pressure cookers were left in two Manhattan locations on Friday, disrupting automobile and subway travel during the morning rush hour before police deemed them harmless and began investigating the possibility of a hoax.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    A judge in London said on Friday he would grant a firm called Process and Industrial Developments Ltd (P&ID) the right to seek to seize some $9 billion (7.4 billion pounds) in assets from the Nigerian government over an aborted gas project.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    A Russian granny’s embroidery helps ease her dementia and has amazed social media users for its unique style. She creates lots of cats and nudes, and has refused numerous calls to sell her work, dreaming instead of an exhibition. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    A Russian granny’s embroidery helps ease her dementia and has amazed social media users for its unique style. She creates lots of cats and nudes, and has refused numerous calls to sell her work, dreaming instead of an exhibition. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Hong Kong officials have denied permits for a march organized this Sunday by the same group that coordinated massive marches earlier this summer.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    It appears most Americans don’t believe the official narrative on the death of convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein after a poll found that more people believe the financier died as a result of murder rather than suicide. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    It appears most Americans don’t believe the official narrative on the death of convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein after a poll found that more people believe the financier died as a result of murder rather than suicide. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    U.S. President Donald Trump on Friday was to meet U.S. top advisers about negotiations with the Taliban and the potential for a political settlement, a senior administration official said.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Russian businessman Mikhail Prokhorov has officially agreed to sell his remaining portion in the NBA club Brooklyn Nets to Chinese billionaire and Alibaba Group owner Joseph Tsai. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Banks in Hong Kong say they can cope with a sudden increase in demand for cash after reported calls by protesters to take out and convert their money to dollars in a bid to put pressure on the local authorities. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Some Danish lawmakers compared the idea to colonialism.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    US congresswoman Rashida Tlaib (D-Michigan) has indicated that she will not travel to Israel to visit relatives, after Tel Aviv reversed its earlier decision to deny her entry. The US lawmaker had requested that the ban be lifted. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    US congresswoman Rashida Tlaib (D-Michigan) has indicated that she will not travel to Israel to visit relatives, after Tel Aviv reversed its earlier decision to deny her entry. The US lawmaker had requested that the ban be lifted. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Spot power prices in Texas almost tripled to a record high for Friday as the state's grid operator took emergency measures for a second time this week to keep the lights on as consumers cranked up their air conditioners to escape a heat wave.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    That August 16, 1999 fell on a Monday is of little significance except in the world of television, which quite unexpectedly experienced a revolutionary moment that night.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan has escalated his no-holds-barred verbal assault on nuclear rival India, as tensions once again reach boiling point over the disputed territory of Kashmir. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    If mixed martial arts wanted to end sport’s tiresome gender debate it should allow ‘intergender’ matches where men fight women for championship belts. Then we might just end the tedious back and forth in one fell submission. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    British Superbike Championship star Luke Mossey had a scary moment during testing at British circuit Cadwell Park as he went airborne and lost control of his bike over the top of the track’s most famous turn. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Britain’s military strength has declined for the ninth consecutive year despite calls from officials for increased defense activity in the Gulf and Arctic and a recruitment strategy targeting ‘millennials’ over the past 12 months. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Britain’s military strength has declined for the ninth consecutive year despite calls from officials for increased defense activity in the Gulf and Arctic and a recruitment strategy targeting ‘millennials’ over the past 12 months. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren on Friday unveiled her latest policy plan, which aims to empower Native American tribes through land protection and law enforcement reforms and boost financial support for chronically underfunded health and education programs.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    The pilots, who carried out a successful emergency landing in a cornfield, saving the lives of all the passengers, have been awarded with a high state honor – the ‘Hero of Russia’ title. The crew received Orders of Courage. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    The pilots, who carried out a successful emergency landing in a cornfield, saving the lives of all the passengers, have been awarded with a high state honor – the ‘Hero of Russia’ title. The crew received Orders of Courage. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Roller coaster fans savor every second of the ride, but there's something really special about that big drop.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Muftiyah Tlaib lives in the same house in the same West Bank village she has called home since 1974.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    The latest volley of vitriol underlines how far from peace the Korean Peninsula is, as diplomatic detente stumbles.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    With pharmaceutical and even robotic “cures” in the works for loneliness - a condition once considered part of the normal human emotional range but now framed as a health risk - we risk losing the ability to be alone at all. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    The leader of the opposition Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, said lawmakers who oppose his proposal to lead an emergency government should consider the threat posed to Britain by a no-deal exit from the European Union.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    High-level executives with children have a few advantages over other working parents: They make more money, which makes childcare easier to afford. They may have more say in where and when they work. And they can influence what "family friendly" means at their companies.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Britain's energy regulator said it expects to publish an initial report by grid operator National Grid next Tuesday into what caused disruptive power cuts last week.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    One woman dead after two cases are confirmed in South Kivu’s Lwindi district, near DRC’s border with RwandaThe year-long Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has spread to a new province, with two cases – one of them fatal – confirmed in South Kivu.The confirmed cases were reported in the Mwenga area, some way south of the city of Bukavu, which sits on the country’s eastern border with Rwanda. Continue reading...
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Riot police charge hundreds of protesters in Zimbabwe hours after a court rejected an opposition attempt to overturn the ban on a planned rally. Witnesses reported chaotic scenes, with many protesters beaten with batons, at least three injured and others loaded into armoured vehiclesChaos in Harare as Zimbabwe riot police violently disperse protesters Continue reading...
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    The U.S. president has reportedly asked advisers about buying the north Atlantic country on several occasions.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Police officers and a bomb squad have been deployed to inspect three suspicious packages found at a busy subway station in New York City. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    British police launched a murder investigation after an officer was killed in southeast England, the latest in a spate of violent crimes that has forced new Prime Minister Boris Johnson to pledge to do more to protect law and order.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    A traveler captured the blue-green color of Barracuda Lake, revealing the ominous-looking vast space of empty water.       
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    A British parliamentary candidate bidding to become a Liberal Democrat MP has come under fire after mocking a Labour police commissioner as “little more than Barbie doll reading from a script,” during a rant on YouTube. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    A US state trooper came across a car pulled over along a busy highway. Thinking the driver was in distress, the officer approached to investigate, only to discover the motorist was playing Pokemon Go... on eight separate phones. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Democratic presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke said on Thursday he was resuming his campaign with a new sense of focus after a mass shooting in his Texas hometown, while rival John Hickenlooper ended his bid to take on President Donald Trump.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    President Trump has been pressing the Fed to help head off a feared economic slowdown, but it's not clear the central bank has the ammunition.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    A vehicle drove into a line of protesters outside a detention centre in Rhode Island on Wednesday. Dozens of people were protesting against the contract between US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the Wyatt detention facility when a correctional officer swerved into the crowd. Officers at the scene then pepper sprayed the demonstrators. At least one person was taken to hospital with a broken leg Continue reading...
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Cathay Pacific has been under intense pressure after it was found that two of its pilots had become involved in the current protest in Hong Kong.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
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  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Other observers have dismissed the suggestion that China would sell U.S. Treasurys to gain an upper hand in the trade war.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Norway said Thursday it would halt Amazon protection subsidies worth 30 million euros ($33 million) to Brazil, which it accused of turning its back on the fight against deforestation.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    The way China responds to the situation in Hong Kong will be crucial in determining how markets and U.S.-China trade talks will be affected, said David Roche, a strategist at London-based research firm Independent Strategy.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    In New Delhi, one organization wants to drive India to a more sustainable future.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
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  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Fashion retailer Ted Baker Plc said on Friday it had signed a new product licence agreement with Next Plc , replacing Debenhams next year, to expand its collection of childrenswear.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Prime Minister Boris Johnson's government would win a vote of no confidence put forward by the opposition Labour Party, energy minister Kwasi Kwarteng said on Friday.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    US safety agencies are investigating the crash of a small plane in Tennessee that was carrying retired race car driver Dale Earnhardt Jr and his wife and daughter. Earnhardt's sister Kelley tweeted that the two pilots of the Cessna Citation and three family members were safe and being taken to a hospital for observation. There were no serious injuries, according to officials in Tennessee cited by media. Earnhardt, who was Nascar's longtime biggest star, gave up full-time racing after the 2017 season. He now broadcasts Nascar races for NBC Sports Continue reading...
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    The national stud farm, which was established in the 16th century to breed and train ceremonial horses for the Habsburg court, has become a Unesco world heritage site. Located 56 miles east of Prague in the town of Kladruby nad Labem, it is the first stud farm in the world to be be listed by UN agency Continue reading...
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Saudi Arabia denies claims that staff at detention facilities treat violent abuse of undocumented migrants ‘like a sport’When police arrested Tayib Mohammed at the southern border of Saudi Arabia, they seized all his worldly possessions and set them on fire.The 45-year-old undocumented Ethiopian migrant was trying to cross from Yemen after a five-day trek through the bush. “They told me to undress,” he recalled several weeks later in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, wearing sandals and pyjamas. “They took away everything I had – phone, clothes, money. They burned them in front of me.” Continue reading...
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    The trade war between the U.S. and China is turning into a brewing currency war, say analysts. Bank of America Merrill Lynch Global Research predicts what might happen to the yuan in three scenarios.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Once an obscure idea confined to the darker corners of the internet, the anti-Islam ideology is now visible in the everyday politics of the west. How did this happen? By Andrew BrownIn July 2011, a quiet European capital was shaken by a terrorist car bomb, followed by confused reports suggesting many deaths. When the first news of the murders came through, one small group of online commentators reacted immediately, even though the media had cautiously declined to identify the attackers. They knew at once what had happened – and who was to blame.“This was inevitable,” explained one of the anonymous commenters. And it was just the beginning: “Only a matter of time before other European nations get a taste of their multicultural tolerance that they’ve been cooking for decades.” Continue reading...
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Beijing has used both monetary and fiscal policies to limit the economic damage brought on by elevated U.S. tariffs.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    The United States on Thursday threatened a visa ban on the crew of a seized Iranian supertanker whose departure from Gibraltar Washington failed to block.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    He might have taken up a new job, but US President Donald Trump, a real estate mogul turned-politician, is reportedly back to his old ways and is now looking to buy Greenland, Denmark’s self-governing territory. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    President Donald Trump made fun of a protester’s “serious weight problem” - and implied he lived with his mother - at an election rally in Manchester, New Hampshire, triggering a tidal wave of #Resistance offense-taking. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Kenneth Rosen on how British gangs are using a loophole in the law to get hold of antique firearms and untraceable bullets. Plus: Guardian editor-in-chief Katharine Viner on the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo massacreA drive-by shooting of four girls outside a nightclub in Birmingham in 2003 shocked the country. Letisha Shakespeare, aged 17, and Charlene Ellis, aged 18, both died, innocent victims caught in the crossfire of gang shootings. It set off a huge murder investigation, and when police examined the scene they found that one of the guns used was an antique and the ammunition was untraceable. Journalist Kenneth Rosen tells India Rakusen how those bullets found at the scene in 2003 were the beginning of a mystery. Hundreds of ‘ghost bullets’ started to appear in crime scenes across the country and a long search began for their creator. Continue reading...
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    "Recessions are always inevitable, the only question is: 'When?'" says Ray Dalio, founder of Bridgewater Associates.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Ghislaine Maxwell, alleged procurer and madam for the now-deceased Jeffrey Epstein, has been photographed at a Los Angeles fast food spot, reading a book about the lives (and deaths) of CIA operatives. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Prehistoric inhabitants were infected with intestinal worms from eating raw fish, experts say.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Rep. Ilhan Omar has accused Israel of implementing US President Donald Trump’s “Muslim ban” by denying her entry, to cheers of Democrats happy to denounce Trump, but raised eyebrows from conservatives and Israelis. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Hong Kong protesters' social media use demonstrates an increased understanding of cybersecurity and how to effectively communicate with the medium.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    Nobu had been nervous about partnerships after losing money in restaurants in Peru and Alaska, but his first venture with De Niro in New York opened in Tribeca in 1994 and had much success. The pair went on to found Nobu Hospitality together.
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    General Electric is a fraud “bigger than Enron and Worldcom combined,” according to the whistleblower who exposed fraudster Bernie Madoff - but GE’s CEO has accused him of manipulating the market. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Friday 16 August, 2019
    NATO’s Eastern European member states have terrible navies that suffer from “legacy concepts” and equipment and can’t do much against Russia, a prominent professor lamented, asking the US Navy to do something about it. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Thursday 15 August, 2019
    Thousands of people, many waving Pakistani and Kashmiri flags, protested outside the Indian High Commission in London on Thursday in support of the disputed Himalayan region of Kashmir.
  • Thursday 15 August, 2019
    17 smart gadgets under $100 to upgrade your home       
  • Thursday 15 August, 2019
    With just seconds to act, two pilots managed to land a disabled Airbus jet in a field near Moscow after a huge birdstrike had stalled its engines – and the heroic moment is already being compared to the 2009 miracle on the Hudson. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Thursday 15 August, 2019
    A routine Russian flight to Hawaii under the Open Skies treaty has been invoked by a former senior Obama administration official to stir up panic among the ‘Russiagate’ holdovers, proving some conspiracies just refuse to go away. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Thursday 15 August, 2019
    Built with composite materials and armed with up to 16 cruise missiles, the state-of-the-art frigate Admiral Kasatonov is ready to hit the Baltic Sea for final production trials in the coming days. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Thursday 15 August, 2019
    In the early days of WeWork, the two people most associated with the company were cofounders Adam Neumann and Miguel McKelvey. As they grew the brand, the pair was interviewed and photographed, together and separately, by numerous publications.
  • Thursday 15 August, 2019
    Mayor of London Sadiq Khan has been “a complete failure” on knife crime, too preoccupied with “trendy identity politics,” George Galloway claims. He’s also labeled the UK Home Office’s chicken box initiative as “gesture politics.” Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Thursday 15 August, 2019
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Thursday 15 August, 2019
    An aircraft bomb that remained buried underground for almost 80 years was found by construction workers at the Kremlin, the official residence of the Russian president. Read Full Article at RT.com
  • Thursday 15 August, 2019
    U.S. congresswoman Rashida Tlaib on Friday rejected Israel’s offer to let her travel to the West Bank, saying she would not visit her family after the Israeli government lifted a ban on her entry but imposed “oppressive conditions” to humiliate her.
  • Thursday 15 August, 2019
    Opposition parties launched rival campaigns to topple Prime Minister Boris Johnson and stop him taking Britain out of the European Union without a deal, illustrating fractures in the anti-Brexit movement that make neither scheme likely to succeed.
  • Thursday 15 August, 2019
    The growing possibility of a no deal Brexit will present a very difficult shock for Ireland but is one its strongly growing economy is well-placed to respond to, Irish Finance Minister Paschal Donohoe said on Thursday.
  • Thursday 15 August, 2019
    We want to hear if you opted for a non-traditional dress, or if you’ve repurposed it so you could wear it againWorn for the big day, gone tomorrow – for many people a wedding dress will be the single most expensive item of clothing they ever buy. It may also be